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Predicting object states in Mandarin Chinese – insights from the bǎ-construction

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Abstract

The Mandarin Chinese bǎ-construction offers a unique case to study the online comprehension of structural meaning (temporal and causal relations) independent of content meaning (lexically specified object qualities). Can referent states be activated before they are qualitatively specified? Results from two visual world studies suggest that processing the function word bǎ activates such an abstract representation in the comprehender’s situation model. This representation interacts with the visual input, and leads to predictions of linguistic input. We interpret predictions on the basis of such type of structural information as a special kind of incremental processing which has not been reported previously.
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Growth Curve Analysis and Visualization Using R provides a practical, easy-to-understand guide to carrying out multilevel regression/growth curve analysis (GCA) of time course or longitudinal data in the behavioral sciences, particularly cognitive science, cognitive neuroscience, and psychology. With a minimum of statistical theory and technical jargon, the author focuses on the concrete issue of applying GCA to behavioral science data and individual differences. http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466584327 http://www.danmirman.org/gca
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