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Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary/alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): Recruitment rates and challenges.

Authors:
  • University Applied Sciences and the Arts Western Swizerland

Abstract

Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary/alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): Recruitment rates and challenges.
Results
Non-Specific Mechanisms in Orthodox and Complementary/
Alternative Management of Back Pain (The MOCAM Study):
Recruitment Rates and Challenges
M Al-Abbadey, K Bradbury, D Carnes, BD Dimitrov, C Fawkes, J Foster, G Lewith, H MacPherson, L
Roberts, L Wilde, L Yardley, F L Bishop
Miznah Al-Abbadey
Email: Maa1g10@soton.ac.uk
Department of Psychology
Purpose and Background
The MOCAM study is a major prospective questionnaire-based study investigating the
relationship between low back pain (LBP) patient outcomes and non-specific treatment
components, i.e., therapeutic relationship, healthcare environment, incidental treatment
characteristics, patients’ beliefs and practitioners’ beliefs.
Participating acupuncturists, osteopaths, and physiotherapists from the NHS and private
sector have been asked to recruit at least 10 patients into the study.
Methods
Recruitment has taken place over 17 months. Invitation letters or emails
were sent to individual practitioners identified using online search tools
and professional networks. Private sector practitioners are paid £15 for
each patient they recruit into the study. NHS practitioners are supported
via accruals. Recruitment rates were analysed descriptively.
AIM
To present analyses of current recruitment rates
from MOCAM and identify barriers and facilitators to
effective recruitment of physiotherapists,
osteopaths, acupuncturists, and their patients in the
NHS and private sector.
Funders: Arthritis Research UK
Special Strategic Award Reference 20552
Conclusions
Recruiting practitioners has been challenging. While the response rates in the NHS are
higher than in the private sector the absolute number of acupuncturists and osteopaths
participating from the NHS is very low. This may be due to changes in the NHS
commissioning landscape. However, further investigation is required to confirm this. The
higher recruitment rates of patients from NHS settings may reflect different patient
populations across sectors.
Response rate (Number recruited/Number
invited)
Practitioner
Type
Private Sector
NHS
Acupuncture
3% (55/1730)
100% (2/2)
Physiotherapy
4% (41/1054)
65% (47/72)
Osteopathy
6% (53/912)
8% (1/13)
Facilitators and barriers to
recruitment What have we
learnt?
- There is a much smaller pool of
osteopaths and acupuncturists in
the NHS compared with
physiotherapists.
- Acupuncturists seem to be seeing
less patients with low back pain
compared with osteopaths and
physiotherapists.
- NHS recruitment may be better
than private recruitment because of
a greater sense of accountability to
motivate initial participation and
subsequent recruitment of patients
(i.e., with the clinical research
network approaching physios and
following up how well they recruit).
Practitioner recruitment Patient recruitment
Sector
Acupuncture
Osteopathy
Physiotherapy
Target
Number
NHS
11
5
131
493
Private
100
261
120
493
Total
111
266
251
Target
329
329
329
986
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