Abstract

In today's multinational marketplace, it is increasingly important to understand why some consumers prefer global brands to local brands. We delineate three pathways through which perceived brand globalness (PBG) influences the likelihood of brand purchase. Using consumer data from the U.S.A. and Korea, we find that PBG is positively related to both perceived brand quality and prestige and, through them, to purchase likelihood. The effect through perceived quality is strongest. PBG effects are weaker for more ethnocentric consumers.Journal of International Business Studies (2003) 34, 53–65. doi:10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8400002
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How perceived brand globalness creates brand value
Jan-Benedict E M Steenkamp; Rajeev Batra; Dana L Alden
Journal of International Business Studies; Jan 2003; 34, 1; ABI/INFORM Global
pg. 53
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... As an alternative, the present study encourages brand managers and marketers to use an upward pricing strategy for a Disney collaborated collection, which can reduce negative effects on the luxury perceptions of consumers. Because higher prices have aspirational and prestige appeal (Steenkamp et al., 2003), marketers can expect to increase perceptions of luxury by implementing an upward extension with Disney collaborations. ...
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