Abstract and Figures

This paper aims to analyze how ownership influences the performance of European football teams. The study of efficiency allows us to identify relative performance in the achievement of several objectives, as is the case of football teams pursuing both financial performance and sports success. The analysis shows that football teams organized as members clubs, with dispersed ownership and uncontrolled by foreign investors perform better. Thus, property structures facilitating less control over managers relate positively to performance.
Content may be subject to copyright.
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
18
1. INTRODUCTION
Turnovers in professional football have grown exponentially in recent
years thanks to a greater competition for television rights and the
achievement of increasingly large advertising contracts. European
football has stopped targeting a local market and now focuses on
a global audience following their matches on television and buying
their products from anywhere on the planet.
The greater professionalization of football has changed it from a
hobby to a part of the leisure industry, a change that has attracted
new investors and modified the ownership structures of the teams.
Many clubs have started to organize as capital companies, listed
companies, or they have fallen into the hands of foreign investors.
This has sparked debate on team ownership structure and its impact
on both sporting and financial performance. The owners of football
teams pursue two different objectives: a monetary return linked to
financial results and an emotional return that will depend on sporting
success.
This paper aims to look at how the legal form of football teams, the
concentration of their property and the nationality of their owners
affect performance. The three characteristics of the property under
study respond to three issues abundantly dealt with in the literature
across different sectors. However, in the case of football it is a
loophole that we attempt to address. The interest of this study is
that this issue can be made extensive to other sectors sharing the
characteristics of this sport. This would be the case of businesses in
which the owners pursuing multiple objectives and a heterogeneous
property structure coexist.
Interestingly, several European countries have implemented
regulatory changes in opposite directions concerning the
characteristics of team ownership. So while some countries
have legislated to restrict or eliminate the existence of clubs, thus
Does the Agency eory
play football?1
Received: 30 July 2016. Accepted: 06 March 2017 DOI: 10.3232/UBR.2017.V14.N1.01
JEL CODES:
D21, D22, D23, G32,
L21, L31, L83
¿Juega al fútbol la Teoría de la Agencia?
Luis Carlos Sánchez
Universidad de Vigo
correo@luiscarlos.es
Ángel Barajas2
Universidad de Vigo
National Research
University Higher School
of Economics, Russian
Federation
abarajas@uvigo.es
Patricio Sánchez-
Fernández
Universidad de Vigo
patricio@uvigo.es
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
19
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This paper aims to analyze how ownership influences the performance of European football
teams. The study of efficiency allows us to identify relative performance in the achievement of
several objectives, as is the case of football teams pursuing both financial performance and
sports success. The analysis shows that football teams organized as members clubs, with
dispersed ownership and uncontrolled by foreign investors perform better. Thus, property
structures facilitating less control over managers relate positively to performance.
RESUMEN DEL ARTÍCULO
El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar la influencia de la propiedad en el desempeño de
los equipos de fútbol europeos. El estudio de la eficiencia nos permite conocer el desempeño
relativo en la consecución de varios objetivos como es el caso de los equipos de fútbol donde
se persiguen el rendimiento financiero y los éxitos deportivos. El análisis muestra que aquellos
equipos de fútbol organizados como clubes, con una propiedad dispersa y no controlados por
inversores foráneos tienen un mejor desempeño. Así las estructuras de propiedad que facilitan
un menor control sobre los directivos, tienen una relación positiva con el desempeño.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
20
favouring the concentration of capital and the appearance of foreign
investors, other countries have legislated to preserve dispersed team
ownership by making it difficult for these teams to fall into foreign
hands. This paper aims to provide empirical evidence on what may
be the right direction.
2. PROPERTY AND PERFORMANCE STRUCTURES
2.1. Literature Review
Companies are constituted as entities with their own legal personality
that develop a commercial activity assuming rights and obli-
gations regardless of the rights and obligations of their ow-
ners. The limitation of this equity responsibility to the assets
of the company itself is one of the advantages that explains
the success of this figure. Companies have other advantages
under certain legal forms such as their unlimited life, reaching
a duration beyond the life of their owners. This allows them to
maintain at least a part of their intellectual and physical capital
even if their owners change. All this has facilitated the growth
of companies constituted as corporations and their market
domination over individual entrepreneurs.
Business development has given rise to a very heterogeneous scena-
rio with corporations of very diverse characteristics. The first differen-
ce is the very legal figure under which they are constituted, since trade
legislation offers a wide range of possibilities. Legal figures can be
divided roughly between capital companies, where voting rights are
distributed according to invested capital; and members owned firms,
where the vote is distributed personally and each owner has one vote.
The latter is the case of clubs, consumers cooperatives or mutualities.
According to the agency theory, different types of organizations arise
from the different incentives of the contracting parties and the different
costs of controlling these incentives (Jensen and Meckling, 1976).
Hansmann (1988) analyzed why capitalists do not control firms in
certain situations as they do in most businesses. He concluded that
in most cases, capital providers were in a better position to exercise
effective control over managers than other stakeholders. This redu-
ced agency problems. On the other hand, Mayers and Smith (1988)
show that organized companies like mutualities or user cooperatives
appeared in sectors where resolving the conflict between owners and
customers represented a competitive advantage.
is paper aims to look
at how the legal form
of football teams, the
concentration of their
property and the natio-
nality of their owners
aect performance.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
21
On the other hand, the non-existence of title deeds in non-capitalist
societies means owners are not motivated to think long-term and they
merely take advantage of the rights currently associated to it (Nilsson,
2001). This triggers a disincentive to investment, especially to inves-
tments with longer recovery periods (Vitaliano, 1983).
In addition to legal form, other company property characteristics co-
llected in the literature are the degree of concentration of the property
– whether a limited number of shareholders control it.
In large companies, where property is scattered among a large num-
ber of people, decisions are taken by managers who relegate share-
holders to supervisory role. But carrying out such supervision entails a
cost in time and resources that gives small shareholders less incentive
to control managers who are better informed than they are (Grossman
and Hart, 1980). Control over managers is a public good that would
benefit all shareholders, regardless of whether they assume the cost
of this control (Stiglitz, 1982). Shleifer and Vishny (1986) argue that
large shareholders have incentives to supervise managers because
of the economic importance of their investment.
Given this situation, a more concentrated ownership may imply grea-
ter control over the managers, which would ultimately lead to better
company performance. On the other hand, large shareholders may
behave opportunistically at the expense of small shareholders (La
Porta et al., 1999). For example, large shareholders may impose their
own companies as providers at the expense of better options. This
is detrimental to the value of the company they share with minority
shareholders.
Another aspect under study is owner nationality. Greater capital mar-
ket globalization entails a more frequent corporate presence of foreign
business investors. Academic literature has found a great deal of evi-
dence concerning the positive relation between foreign ownership and
the financial performance of a company.
Better control over managers may explain this phenomenon, espe-
cially when it comes to investments in countries with low shareholder
protection and weak corporate law structures (civil law countries). The
participation of foreign capital mitigates the problems of agency by
facilitating financial transparency and limiting the discretion of mana-
gers.
Borensztein et al. (1998) found that foreign investors also provide lo-
cal firms with know-how through the transfer of knowledge, technolo-
gy and better management techniques.
KEY WORDS
Agency Theory,
Sport finance,
foreign ownership,
concentrated
ownership, football
clubs.
PALABRAS CLAVE
Teoría de la Agencia,
Finanzas del
deporte, propietarios
extranjeros, propiedad
concentrada, clubs de
fútbol.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
22
The literature has addressed other property characteristics that have
enriched the development of the agency theory. The creation of sha-
res with different voting power and pyramid ownership structures
affect the relationship between principal and agent in corporate go-
vernance as shown by Faccio et al. (2001), Claessens et al. (2002)
and Lins (2003). Although these structures have long been present in
the business fabric, they have only been used by Manchester United
when in 2012 it issued shares with fewer rights. Thomsen and Peder-
sen (2000) pointed out the importance of the nature of the majority
shareholder: family groups, investment funds, credit institutions, etc.
Another relevant aspect in the literature of agency theory is the influen-
ce of the degree of protection of minority shareholder rights. Literature
has used the differentiation between Anglo-Saxon countries - with a
legal system based on common law - and continental countries -with
a civil law system- to explain this degree of protection as in LaPorta et
al. (1999) and Maury and Pajuste (2005).
2.2. Property in Football
2.2.1. Football Clubs and Sports Corporations
Football was born as a recreational activity, so the first teams were
organized as clubs, a type of partnership in which each member has a
vote. At the end of the 19th century, Professionalism led English teams
to become commercial companies, a legal personality where the num-
ber of votes of each member depends on the capital contributed.
This process continued in other countries when the idea that club
members had no incentive to control managers spread and football
clubs were observed to spend beyond their means to obtain short-
term sports results. In view of this, as of the 80s many countries
(among them Spain) passed legislation to convert football clubs into
corporations and thus obtain shareholders with an incentive to finan-
cially balance their teams. Notwithstanding, Sánchez et al. (2016a)
found no empirical evidence of the existence of a relationship between
the legal form of the teams and their financial performance.
2.2.2. Concentration of ownership
When they were constituted as companies with capital, some football
teams were controlled by a broad base of investors and fans. Howe-
ver, many of them fell into the hands of a small number of sharehol-
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
23
ders; this ended the relationship between ownership and the social
base of the teams. Empirical evidence on the impact of this concen-
tration of ownership on the financial profitability of the team presents
different results. Dimitropoulos and Tsagkanos (2012) analyzed a he-
terogeneous set of European teams and found a positive relationship
between the concentrated ownership of the teams and their financial
profitability. In contrast, Sánchez et al. (2016a) focused their study on
the largest teams on the continent and found the opposite relation-
ship: a greater concentration in ownership had a negative effect on
financial profitability.
Apart from the exceptional presence of the Italian dynasty Agnelli in
Juventus Turin, the presence of family groups has not characterized
football team ownership. Moreover, the presence of investment funds
and credit institutions in football teams is residual and limited to small
holdings in those listed on the stock exchange.
Anglo-Saxon companies are often characterized as having a much
more dispersed ownership structure than companies in continental
Europe, where it is more common to find shareholders controlling lar-
ge corporate shareholdings. In the case of football, this situation is
reverse. While in the English league an abundance of teams have
controlling shareholders who dominate large shareholdings, in conti-
nental leagues it is easier to find teams with scattered ownership dis-
tributed among numerous club members or small shareholders.
Likewise, while in other sectors North American and British companies
share the same institutional scope, in sports the American and British
institutional context differs significantly. This is why the results of the
literature in these sectors is not transferable to the sports sector. In
the United States and Canada, teams participating in closed leagues
without promotions or relegations are the ones that organize sports
competitions and they usually share part of the income. By contrary, in
Europe (including the UK) teams do not own competitions and sports
federations supervise them. The participation in the leagues varies
according to sports results that trigger promotion or relegation. This
is why a hypothetical global classification of sports companies by ins-
titutional criteria should differ among North American and European
companies.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
24
2.2.3. Nationality of the property
In football, foreign investors only participate as controlling sharehol-
ders in teams with a concentrated ownership. The structure of football
ownership is unique as compared to other sectors; the three charac-
teristics cannot be studied simultaneously within the same model be-
cause they are strongly interrelated. All teams with foreign owners-
hip are capital companies with concentrated ownership. Likewise, all
teams with concentrated ownership are capital companies.
The participation of foreign capital in football teams is a relatively re-
cent phenomenon. After becoming capital companies, nothing pre-
vented them from falling into foreign hands. At first, however, the na-
tionality of the owners coincided with that of the team. The growing
revenue generated by teams in the form of television rights and spon-
sorships, and their impact on the media across and beyond national
borders, has attracted foreign capital to the major European leagues.
The empirical evidence is non-conclusive concerning the influence of
the internationalization of team ownership. Wilson et al. (2013) found
no relationship between the nationality of the owners of an English
Premier League team and their financial profitability. On the other
hand, Sanchez et al. (2016a) did find a statistically significant rela-
tionship in a sample of European teams. In this case, the presence of
foreign owners negatively affected the profitability of the team.
Wilson et al. (2013) found that foreign ownership of a team influenced
their sporting results in the English league. However, this research did
not consider the size of the teams, a feature Hoehn and Szymans-
ki (1999) found to greatly influence sports results. This is why the-
re could have been a bias error. If foreign investors invest in larger
teams, these teams may obtain better sports results.
2.2.4. Stock market listing
Most academic literature on the influence of business ownership focu-
ses on listed companies. Yet in the football sector, a minority of teams
are listed on the stock market. This is an important point because the
degree of minority shareholder protection depends notably on whether
or not the team is listed in the stock market. Minority shareholders of
unlisted teams face greater difficulties in exercising control over ma-
nagers. Our work incorporates this degree of protection using a varia-
ble indicating whether or not the team is listed to analyze its impact on
the quality of team management.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
25
Although a priori it may be argued that the main objective of a listed
team would be to maximize the value of its shareholders based on
financial results, empirical studies have revealed a different trend. Zu-
ber et al. (2005) found that the contribution of the team did not respond
to its financial situation as was the case in other sectors. The academic
literature has so far shown that the influence of stock exchange listing
is nil both in terms of financial performance (Leah and Szymanski,
2015) and sports performance (Baur and McKeating, 2011).
3. EFFICIENCY AS A MEASURE OF MULTI-OBJECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
Norh (1990) defined firms as groups of individuals united to achieve
certain purposes that are more easily attainable collectively than they
are individually thanks to the existence of a hierarchical structure and
stable contractual relationships with other agents. Following this defi-
nition, the objective of the companies is no other than to achieve the
objectives pursued by their owners.
In the classic company theory, this objective is linked to the maximi-
zation of the capital owners have invested. However, in the business
world we can find a more complex situation. The investment deci-
sion, like any other human decision, aims to obtain increased satis-
faction. Higher monetary yield means increased investor satisfaction;
but other rewards or emotional dividends may increase the profit ob-
tained. Sánchez (2012) specifies some cases, such as the satisfac-
tion of participating in a family business, that involve maintaining a
legacy received from previous generations or participating in media
companies that involve satisfaction for the capacity to influence public
opinion and political decisions. These satisfactions will increase the
utility obtained by the monetary yield of the investment (Figure 1).
Football is one of the sectors where you can find this emotional divi-
dend. The first professional English teams were constituted as capital
companies. The legislation itself stated that its objective was two-fold:
profit and glory” or the pursuit of profit and sports success. In the 80s,
legislation equated the commercial figure of football teams to the rest
of the companies to allow them to be listed on the stock market. What
is more, it also eliminated restrictions concerning profit distribution.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
26
By no means has this eliminated the debate in the literature about the
purpose of football teams. Some studies, such as El-Hodiri and Quirk
(1971), Fort and Quirk (1995) and Szymanski and Késenne (2004)
assume that sports teams aim to maximize profit just like any other
business. While other authors, such as Sloane (1971) or Morrow
(2003), argue that in Europe clubs seek to maximize utility through
sporting results by considering some financial constraints.
The debate in itself could be unapproachable and made extensive to
other sectors. Kang and Sorensen (1999) argue that shareholders
are not homogeneous and may have different behaviours and diffe-
rent objectives or incentives. Studies often tend to implicitly assume
shareholders are monolithic and all of them pursue the same objecti-
ves. Yet it really does not have to be that way; investors with different
motivations can coexist within the same sector.
In the case of football, the investment of Volkswagen in Vfl Wolfsburg
or the Agnelli family in Juventus Turin can be motivated by achieving
a close relationship with the community. This is something that cannot
extended to the motivations of the Glazer brothers when acquiring
Manchester United. Given a multiplicity of objectives, the estimates
of efficiency coefficients allows us to measure and compare the per-
formance of the managers in different teams. The study of efficiency
allows us to evaluate the scope of the objectives subjected to limited
resource restrictions.
The ratios allow only us to compare two variables, so output must be
unitary. By contrary, the study of efficiency allows us to consider seve-
ral outputs. By means of boundaries defined by the relative efficiency
of homogeneous units called Decision Making Units (DMU) - which
in this case are football teams – we identify the ‘best behaviour’ per-
formed by efficient DMUs that will define the consistent good practice
frontier to maximize shareholder objectives (outputs) with given factor
endowments (inputs). The rest of teams not located at the border will
Figure 1. Football team investment utility
UTILIDAD DE LA
INVERSIÓN
RENTABILIDAD
FINANCIERA
SATISFACCIÓN POR
RENDIMIENTO
DEPORTIVO
= +
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
27
be more inefficient the further they are from the border; this distance
varies in function of the increase they must apply to their outputs with
the available inputs.
This behaviour will be better, the better each of the outputs are. If
we consider that increased profitability and sports success satisfy the
owners of football teams, none of the owners diminish profitability. In
the case of an investor investing only for the sake of emotional satis-
faction, increasing the economic value of the team to obtain a grea-
ter financial profitability will not represent less satisfaction or utility.
Conversely, even if the investors only seek to make their investment
profitable, obtaining sports successes will not be detrimental to sa-
tisfaction or utility. Thus we can compare team management without
being subject to a single output.
Previous literature on the influence of ownership on football team ma-
nagement has scarcely focused on financial profitability as a measure
of the quality of management common to studies in other sectors. But
this involves ignoring the multi-objective nature of football teams as
companies. A large number of owners in football do not seek mone-
tary compensation for their investment, so it makes no sense to use
financial profitability as a proxy for investment utility.
Changing that objective to obtaining sports success is an oversim-
plification given that many investors also have financial objectives.
That is why studying the quality of the management of football teams
requires taking this singularity into account and looking for another
measure of the utility obtained by the owners in management. This is
why we use the coefficient of efficiency obtained in reaching the diffe-
rent owner objectives as a measure of investment utility.
4. A STUDY FOR THE MAIN EUROPEAN FOOTBALL TEAMS
4.1. Sample
For this study we have taken a sample that includes the main
European football teams. Unlike the United States, where
professional sport takes place in closed leagues, the main European
competitions, the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa
League, have not pre-determined a priori and their participants will
be classified in their competitions according to the results of the
previous season. In spite of this theoretically open nature, in practice
a number of teams regularly participate in competition and form a
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
28
group that dominates the sport across the continent thanks to their
higher economic resources.
Seeking teams with the greatest potential, Deloitte elaborates and
publishes a list called the “Football Money League”, which includes
the 20 teams with the highest-income on the continent each year.
Given that working with efficiency coefficient requires balanced
samples, the study covers the period for which we have all the
sample data, 2010 to 2013. We have chosen those teams that have
been present on the Deloitte list the greatest number of times. The
resulting sample consists of 22 teams, a number akin to that of
many national league championships, so the sample is comparable
to most of the work on the sector based on the competitions of a
specific country.
The sample chosen not only represents the most economically
powerful teams but also those that are the most powerful from a
sports point of view. The teams in the sample (presented in table
1) have played the UEFA Champions League finals over the last
10 years. Although the revenues provided by UEFA competitions
are increasingly important, the leagues of the largest countries are
the ones obtaining a higher income from television and competition
rights. Six teams belong to the most financially powerful league, the
English Premier. Five of the rest of the teams come from the Italian
league, four from the German, three from the Spanish and three
from the French league. The Turkish Galatasary completes the list.
Figure 2 shows the teams under study indicating the ones that are
controlled by club members or by minority shareholders versus those
having controlling shareholders. It should be noted that the teams
with a club legal form have all voting rights in the hands of minorities.
Likewise, only teams with foreign control shareholders are in foreign
hands. The owners, dispersed or concentrated, of the rest are of the
same nationality as the team,
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
29
Figure 2. Teams forming part of the sample and their ownership structure
4.2. Methodology and Variables
To study the relationship between the different property structures
of football teams and their efficiency coefficients, we will use panel
data Tobit regression method with panel data, which is also called
censored regression because it delimits the possible values of the
dependent variable between a maximum and a minimum limit. This
method has been widely used in the second-stage efficiency analysis
because the DEA coefficients have values ranging from 0 to 1, as
detailed by Hoff (2007). In this case, the obtained coefficients are
easily interpreted and akin to those obtained using an Ordinary Least
Squares (OLS) method.
The effect of each of the three property characteristics on financial
and sports performance (see figure 1), measured by the coefficient
obtained in the DEA, is studied in three different models.
As previously detailed, the study of efficiency allows us to identify
the degree to which the owner objectives have been achieved; in
football, this includes financial and emotional sport aspects. As a
proxy of the financial objective, we have taken accounting profit as
output and losses as input. We used the weighted UEFA coefficient to
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
30
approximate the sport objective. This coefficient reflects the sporting
success of each team in continental competitions, calculated by
UEFA itself, and we have weighed the results of the Champions
League as being twice that of the Europa League given the greater
importance of this competition. We use total assets as input. It is not
possible to use their own funds because of their negative value for
several teams; this would distort the results. The estimation is done
with input orientation, given the importance of assuming losses in
the disminution of the equity value of the team. The output-oriented
results, however, are virtually identical. Studies about football
efficiency such as Sánchez (2006) and Sánchez et al. (2016b) have
used similar inputs and outputs. We used constant returns to scale
for the estimates given the difficulty of football teams to significantly
change in the short term. Table 1 shows the estimated efficiency
coefficients and Table 2 shows a summary of the variables used.
Table 1. Efficiency coefficients for the teams in the sample
TEAM 2010 2011 2012 2013
AC Milan 47.60 29.74 38.59 48.51
Arsenal 38.15 25.20 38.84 19.61
Atlético 24.80 5.71 19.13 8.78
F.C. Barcelona 77.91 100.00 75.33 49.33
Bayern 100.00 44.15 44.74 62.38
Borussia 64.76 62.23 100.00 71.52
Chelsea 59.25 35.71 38.69 24.94
City Manchester 0.00 7.33 6.23 9.27
Galatasaray 31.40 11.57 0.00 100.00
Hamburgo 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Inter 77.26 28.52 17.45 22.35
Juventus 29.17 6.11 0.00 55.46
Liverpool 44.36 12.85 0.00 18.65
Napoli 99.89 93.88 100.00 22.21
O Lyonnais 100.00 46.33 38.66 28.17
O Marseille 84.60 100.00 100.00 29.04
PSG 0.00 94.37 9.91 4.85
R. Madrid 100.00 45.10 50.01 30.86
Roma 42.15 100.00 2.77 0.00
Schalke 04 57.70 100.00 21.50 73.56
Tottenham 0.00 68.04 7.65 25.23
United Manchester 28.76 32.70 21.49 13.83
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
31
One of these characteristics is the explanatory variable in each of the
three models:
1. Legal figure: the explanatory variable is a dummy indicating
whether the team is constituted as a club, value 1, rather than a
capital company, value 0.
2. Concentration of ownership: in this case the explanatory
variable is the percentage of voting rights controlled by the two
largest shareholders. In most cases, the control of the team
is exercised by a sole large shareholder. For the cases with
two large shareholders, such as Atlético Madrid, management
is shared by both with no incentive to control as discussed by
Maury and Pajuste (2005) and Lopez-de-Foronda, et al. (2007).
The use of this percentage allows us to identify the influence
of a majority shareholder and incorporate the incentives to
behave opportunistically that vary according to a greater or
lesser degree of participation in capital, as indicated by Miguel
et al. (2004). The lowest level of concentration corresponds
to clubs where the voting rights are widely distributed, while
teams with one or two shareholders controlling all of the capital
are at the other end of the spectrum.
3. Ownership nationality: this is a dummy variable indicating
whether the majority of the team owners are the same
nationality as the team itself, value 1. This difference is very
clear given that owners of teams having a majority of foreign
investor ownership always control over 80% of the capital.
The three models also incorporate control variables. On the one hand,
we introduce temporal dummies to capture potential macroeconomic
effects affecting the group of companies under study. On the other
hand, we have also included a dummy reflecting whether the team
shares are listed in an organized securities market and, therefore,
whether the rights of minority shareholders are protected. Likewise,
the model already includes information regarding size and financial
and sport results in the previous calculation of the efficiency
coefficients.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
32
Table 2. Summary of the variables used
VARIABLE OBS. AVERAGE STANDARD
DEV MINIMUM MAXIMUM
Coefcient UEFA 88 13.17 10.50 0.00 34.00 Output
Prot 88 9,494.08 287,413.53 0,00 172,444.00 Output
Loss 88 22,029.90 23,158.99 0.00 227,636.00 Input
Asset 88 413,321.29 36,494.97 36,087.00 1,317,081.00 Input
Coeff. Efciency 88 0.70 0.46 0.00 1.00 Approved
Dependent
Club 88 0.18 0.69 0.00 1.00 Approved
Independent
Concentration 88 0.66 0.39 0.01 1.00 Approved
Independent
National 88 0.70 0.46 0.00 1.00 Approved
Independent
Stock 88 0.27 0.45 0.00 1.00 Approved
Independent
4.3. Results
Table 3 shows the results of the analysis. The three models detect a
globally statistical significant influence of property structure on team
performance. On the contrary, being or not being listed in the stock
market seems to have no affect on team performance. The effect of
ownership shows that team performance is better in the structures
where management control is more difficult. Thus, the results of the
analysis indicate that the performance of a team organized as a club
is better than that of a team organized as a partnership. Similarly, the
results show that the degree of property concentration is negatively
related to performance. This relationship also appears when we
replace that degree of concentration with a dummy establishing
whether or not reference shareholders hold more than half of the
voting rights. The nationality of the owners shows a statistically
significant relationship with the coefficients obtained. Therefore, the
teams whose owners are from the same country as the team perform
better than those controlled by foreign investors.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
33
5. CONCLUSIONS AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS
The development of the agency theory has spurred concern on the
effect of property on corporate performance. The separation between
ownership and control of large companies causes management
inefficiencies, so a priori it seems reasonable to consider that the
greater the ability of owners to supervise, the better.
The classic assumption that objectives of investor decisions are
homogeneous does not correspond to reality. Increased profitability
always implies greater utility, but other company outputs can provide
greater satisfaction to investors. Despite the fact that investments
have converted football teams into capital companies and triggered
their participation in the stock markets, football team investment
provides an additional satisfaction through the emotional dividend
associated to sporting success.
In terms of achieving different objectives, the measure of the
efficiency coefficients gives us information on the performance of
the company as compared to those of its sector. Likewise, efficiency
Table 3. Estimation results
MODELS
(1)
LEGAL
PERSONALITY
(2)
CONCENTRATION
OF PROPERTY
(3)
NATIONALITY OF
PROPERTY
Club 0.195**
(0.116)
Concentration of
property
-0.251**
(0.104)
National Owners 0.226***
(0.084)
Listed in the stock
market
0.031
(0.094)
-0.023
(0.086)
-0.038
(0.084)
Temporal Dummies Ye s Ye s Ye s
Constant 0.505***
(0.076)
0.719***
(0.097)
0.385***
(0.092)
Wald Chi2 12.65** 15.69*** 16.79***
Observations 88 88 88
Standard errors are in parentheses.
***, ** and * indicate levels of statistical signicance of 1%, 5% and 10%, respectively.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
34
enables us to simultaneously and complementarily take into account
the pursuit of several outputs. This is why we use estimated efficiency
coefficients that take financial and sports objectives into account as
a proxy for team performance.
Our work on the influence of European football property structures
shows interesting results that may contribute to the development of
the agency theory given their uniqueness with respect to the work
done in other sectors. A positive relationship has been detected
between teams organized as clubs and their performance. The
members of a football club have little capacity and few incentives
to control the managers. They do not receive any monetary benefit
from their club participation and may, at any time, decide not to
renew their commitment to the club by failing to pay their annual
membership fee. Likewise, their capacity to influence is insignificant
given their high number and the fact that each of them hardly counts
as an individual vote. Although this situation is ideal for managers
pursuing their own objectives at the expense of the interests of their
team owners, organizing the team as a club is positively related with
efficiency in achieving organizational objectives.
The results also show that a greater concentration of ownership
impacts negatively on team performance. This is so despite the fact
that it is more difficult for a dispersed property to supervise managers
than it is for one controlled by large shareholders.
Why does this happen in football? The fact that the club character
has a positive impact could come a likely better resolution of conflicts
between owner-clients who converge into a more mature market
that can give it a competitive advantage if these conflicts are more
relevant than those between owners-contributors. However, we also
find positive relationship with performance in all the teams having
dispersed ownership, clubs and capital companies with a broad base
of shareholders alike.
Political science has already defended the benefits of keeping
a greater distance between decision-making and those affected
by these decisions when it postulated on the advantages of
representative or indirect democracy over assembly or direct
democracy. Distancing was reaffirmed at the beginning of the XIX
century when the British camera rejected that their members had
to fulfil the promises they had made. Proponents of representative
democracy justify that this greater discretion is the way to balance
different interests and make more consistent long-term decisions.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
35
Sometimes this managerial discretion is interpreted as the ability
of managers to extract extra income. In the case of football, this
distance leads to better performance. The need for more immediate
accountability by having more direct owner supervision may be
contradictory in the professional football sector. However, ability
to make decisions evaluated over a longer period is more difficult
to substitute in a more dispersed property; thus direct owner
supervision provides a competitive advantage that translates into
better team performance.
Nonetheless, the agency theory also warns us that large
shareholders either take advantage of their situation to extract
extra income or they undertake less professionalized management.
According to our study, this would represent worse team performance
and a loss for minority shareholders. In teams with dispersed
ownership these minority shareholders can also be fans. But they
would also be adversely affected as important stakeholders in the
case they do not participate in capital. Other stakeholders who may
be at a disadvantage are the public administrations that usually
benefit the teams by granting them significant financial aid such as
sponsorships, subsidies or maintaining municipal stadiums.
In the case of nationality, academic literature explains that this
relationship happens because foreign owners not only contribute
capital to the companies they participate in but they also incorporate
the know-how that has reportedly been successful in their home
markets; and they implement it in the companies where they
participate. In the case of European football, some of the foreign
investors had no experience in the sector while others did; but this
was in the North American market, a much more developed one than
the European but very different in terms of characteristics (closed
leagues, salary caps, etc.).
These conclusions have practical implications in the existing debate
on the role of property ownership regulation in European football.
Some countries have encouraged or forced teams to become capital
companies; this has made it easier for them to fall into the hands of
a small number of owners. Other countries, however, have impeded
concentration, thereby hindering the arrival of foreign investors.
Grounded on the agency theory, the former countries were seeking
better management thanks to the greater control of shareholders
based on agency theory but this does not correspond to the results
of our work.
DOES THE AGENCY THEORY PLAY FOOTBALL?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
36
Likewise the wish of many fans for their teams to become controlled
by foreign potentates proves to be the wrong solution given that the
best results are those obtained precisely by teams having national
owners controlled by a broad base of owners.
Our results may contribute to developing the agency theory in
companies where different objectives co-exist, making their
management more complex and making them more difficult to
evaluate. Future research should confirm or refute other types of
companies in which this happens and identify an element common
to them.
REFERENCES
Baur, D. G., y McKeating, C. (2011). Do Football Clubs Benefit from Initial Public Offerings?
International Journal of Sport Finance, 6(1), 40-59.
Borensztein, E., De Gregorio, J., y Lee, J. W. (1998). How does foreign direct investment
affect economic growth? Journal of international Economics, 45(1), 115-135.
Claessens, S., Djankov, S., Fan, J., y Lang, L. (2002). Disentangling the Incentive and
Entrenchment Effects of Large Shareholdings. Journal of Finance(57), 2741-2771.
De Miguel, A., Pindado, J., y de la Torre, C. (2004). Ownership structure and firm value: new
evidence from Spain. Strategic Management Journal, 25(12), 1199-1207.
Dimitropoulos, P., y Tsagkanos, A. (2012). Financial perfomance and corporate governance in
the European football industry. International Journal of Sport Finance, 7(4), 280-308.
El-Hodiri, M. y Quirk, J. (1971). An economic model of a professional sports league. The
Journal of Political Economy, 1302-1319
Faccio, L., Lang, L., y Young, L. (2001). Dividends and Expropriation. American Economic
Review(91), 54-78.
Fort, R. y Quirk, J. (1995). Cross-subsidization, incentives, and outcomes in professional
team sports leagues. Journal of Economic Literature, 33(3), 1265-1299.
Grossman, S. J., y Hart, O. D. (1980). Takeover bids, the free-rider problem, and the theory of
the corporation. The Bell Journal of Economics, 11(1), 42-64.
Hansmann, H. (1988). Ownership of the Firm. Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization,
4(2), 267-304.
Hoff, A. (2007). Second stage DEA: Comparison of approaches for modelling the DEA score.
European Journal of Operational Research, 181(1), 425-435.
Hoehn, T., y Szymanski, S. (1999). The Americanization of European football. Economic
Policy, 28, 205-240.
Jensen, M., y Meckling, W. (1976). Theory of the firm: managerial behavior, agency costs and
Ownership structure. Journal of Financial Economics, 3, 305-360.
Kang, D. L., y Sorensen, A. B. (1999). Ownership organization and firm performance. Annual
review of sociology, v.25, 121-144
La Porta, R., Lopez-de-Silanes, F., y Shleifer, A. (1999). Corporate ownership around the
world. Journal of Financial Economics(54 (2)), 471-517.
Leah, S., y Szymanski, S. (2015). Making money out of football. Scottish Journal of Politica
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | FIRST QUARTER 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
37
Economy, 62(1), 25-50.
Lins, K. V. (2003). Equity Ownership and Firm Value in Emerging. Journal of Financial and
Quantitative Analysis(38), 159-184.
López-de-Foronda, Ó., López-Iturriaga, F. J. and Santamaría-Mariscal, M. (2007), Ownership
Structure, Sharing of Control and Legal Framework: international evidence. Corporate
Governance: An International Review, 15 (6): 1130–1143.
Maury, B., y Pajuste, A. (2005). Multiple large shareholders and firm value. Journal of Banking
y Finance, 29(7), 1813-1834.
Mayers, D., y Smith, C. (1988). Ownership structure across lines of poverty casualty
insurance. Journal of Law and Economics(31), 357-378.
Morrow, S. (2003). The people’s game?: football, finance and society. London: Palgrave
Macmillan.
Nilsson, J. (2001). Organisational Principles for Co-operative firms. Scandinavian Journal of
Management(17), 329-356.
North, D. C. (1990). Institutions, institutional change and economic performance. Cambridge :
Cambridge university press.
Sanchez, L. C. (2006). ¿ Son compatibles el” bolsillo” y el” corazón”? El caso de las
sociedades anónimas deportivas españolas. Estudios Financieros. Revista de Contabilidad y
Tributación, 283, 131-164.
Sánchez, L.C. (2012). Dividendo emocional: el papel de los accionistas en la responsabilidad
empresarial. Revista de responsabilidad social de la empresa, 12, 15-45.
Sánchez, L. C., Sánchez-Fernández, P., y Barajas, Á. (2016a). Estructuras de propiedad y
rentabilidad financiera en el fútbol europeo. Journal of Sports Economics y Management,
6(1), 5-17.
Sánchez, L.C.; Sánchez-Fernández, P. y Barajas, A. (2016b). Objetivos financieros y
deportivos en la eficiencia del fútbol europeo, Revista de Psicología del Deporte, 25 (3),
47-50
Shleifer, A., y Vishny, R. W. (1986). Large shareholders and corporate control. The Journal of
Political Economy, 94(3), 461-488.
Sloane, P. (1971). The Economics of Professional Football: the football club as a utility
maximizer. Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 17(2), 121-145.
Stiglitz, J. (1982). Ownership, Control and Efficient Markets: Some Paradoxes in the Theory
of Capital Markets. En K. Boyer, y W. Shepherd, Economic Regulation: Essays in honor of
James R. Nelson (págs. 311-321). Ann Arbor: Michigan University Press.
Szymanski, S y Késenne, S. (2004). Competitive balance and gate revenue sharing in team
sports. The Journal of Industrial Economics, 52(1), 165-177.Thomsen, S., y Pedersen, T.
(2000). Ownership structure and economic perfomance in the largest European companies.
Strategic Management Journal, 21(6), 689-705.
Vitaliano, P. (1983). Cooperative enterprise: An alternative conceptual basis for analyzing a
complex institution. American Journal of Agricultural Economics(65), 1078-1083.
Wilson, R., Plumley, D., y Ramchandani, G. (2013). The relationship between ownership
and club perfomance in the English Premier League. Sport, Business and Management: An
International Journal, 3(1), 19-36.
Zuber, R., Yiu, P., Lamb, R. P., y Gandar, J. M. (2005). Investor-fans? An examination of the
perfomance of publicly traded English Premier League teams. Applied Financial Economics,
15(5), 305-313.
NOTES
1. Acknowledgements: We thank the anonymus reviewers for their detailed and rich com-
ments that greatly improved the manuscript.We also appreciate the work done by the two edi-
tors that have handle this paper. he authors. Angel Barajas thanks the financial support from
the National Research University Higher School of Economics’ Basic Research Program.
2. Contact author: Facultad de Ciencias Empresariales y Turismo; Universidad de Vigo;
Campus Universitario; 32004-Ourense; SPAIN
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
3838
1. INTRODUCCIÓN
La facturación del fútbol profesional ha experimentado un
crecimiento exponencial en los últimos años gracias a la mayor
competencia por sus derechos de televisión y la consecución de
contratos publicitarios cada vez más cuantiosos. El fútbol europeo
ha dejado de dirigirse a un mercado local para enfocarse a un
público global que sigue sus partidos por televisión y adquiere sus
productos en cualquier lugar del planeta.
La mayor profesionalización del fútbol ha implicado su transformación
de ser solo un pasatiempo a formar parte de la industria del ocio.
Este cambio ha atraído a nuevos inversores y ha modificado las
estructuras de propiedad de los equipos. Muchos clubes pasaron a
organizarse como sociedades de capital, a cotizar en bolsa o a caer
en manos de inversores foráneos. Esta situación ha despertado un
debate sobre los efectos de la estructura de propiedad de un equipo
en su desempeño tanto deportivo como financiero. Los propietarios
de los equipos de fútbol persiguen dos fines diferentes: el retorno
monetario ligado a los resultados financieros y el retorno emocional
que dependerá de los éxitos deportivos.
El objetivo de este trabajo es conocer como la forma jurídica de los
equipos de fútbol, la concentración de su propiedad y la nacionalidad
de sus propietarios afectan a su desempeño. Las tres características
de la propiedad estudiadas responden a tres cuestiones tratadas
abundantemente en la literatura en diferentes sectores. Sin
embargo, en el caso del fútbol existe una laguna que tratamos de
resolver. El interés no solo radica en la importancia del fútbol sino en
que podría ser extrapolado a otros sectores que compartan algunas
características con este deporte. Sería el caso de negocios en los
que los propietarios persiguen varios objetivos y donde convivan
empresas con estructura de propiedad heterogénea.
Además, el hecho de que en varios países europeos se hayan
¿Juega al fútbol la Teoría
de la Agencia?1
Recibido: 30 de julio de 2016. Aceptado: 6 de marzo de 2017 DOI: 10.3232/UBR.2017.V14.N1.01
CÓDIGO JEL:
D21, D22, D23, G32,
L21, L31, L83
Does the Agency eory play football?
Luis Carlos Sánchez
Universidad de Vigo
correo@luiscarlos.es
Ángel Barajas2
Universidad de Vigo
National Research
University Higher School
of Economics, Russian
Federation
abarajas@uvigo.es
Patricio Sánchez-
Fernández
Universidad de Vigo
patricio@uvigo.es
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
3939
RESUMEN DEL ARTÍCULO
El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar la influencia de la propiedad en el desempeño de
los equipos de fútbol europeos. El estudio de la eficiencia nos permite conocer el desempeño
relativo en la consecución de varios objetivos como es el caso de los equipos de fútbol donde
se persiguen el rendimiento financiero y los éxitos deportivos. El análisis muestra que aquellos
equipos de fútbol organizados como clubes, con una propiedad dispersa y no controlados por
inversores foráneos tienen un mejor desempeño. Así las estructuras de propiedad que facilitan
un menor control sobre los directivos, tienen una relación positiva con el desempeño.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This paper aims to analyze how ownership influences the performance of European football
teams. The study of efficiency allows us to identify relative performance in the achievement of
several objectives, as is the case of football teams pursuing both financial performance and
sports success. The analysis shows that football teams organized as members clubs, with
dispersed ownership and uncontrolled by foreign investors perform better. Thus, property
structures facilitating less control over managers relate positively to performance.
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
40
implementado cambios normativos en sentidos opuestos con
respecto a las características de la propiedad de los equipos
también resulta de interés. Así, mientras unos países han legislado
para restringir o eliminar la existencia de clubes favoreciendo la
concentración del capital y la aparición de inversores extranjeros,
otros países han legislado preservando la dispersión de la propiedad
de los equipos y dificultando que caigan en manos foráneas. El
presente trabajo pretende aportar una evidencia empírica sobre cuál
puede ser la dirección correcta.
2. ESTRUCTURAS DE PROPIEDAD Y DESEMPEÑO
2.1. Revisión de la literatura
Las empresas se constituyen como entidades con su propia
personalidad jurídica para desarrollar una actividad mercantil
asumiendo derechos y obligaciones independientes de los de
sus propietarios. La limitación de esa responsabilidad patri-
monial a los activos de la propia empresa es una de las venta-
jas que explican el éxito de dicha figura. Las empresas, bajo
ciertas formas jurídicas, cuentan con otras ventajas como
tener una vida ilimitada, alcanzando una duración más allá
de la vida de sus propietarios. Esto permite mantener, al me-
nos, parte de su capital intelectual y físico aunque cambien
sus propietarios. Todo ello ha facilitado el crecimiento de las
empresas constituidas como sociedades y su dominio del mercado
frente a los empresarios individuales.
El desarrollo empresarial ha originado un panorama muy heterogé-
neo con sociedades de características muy diversas. La primera dife-
rencia es la propia figura jurídica bajo la que se constituyen dado que
la normativa mercantil ofrece un amplio abanico de posibilidades. Las
figuras jurídicas se pueden dividir, grosso modo, entre sociedades de
capital, donde los derechos de voto se distribuyen en función del capi-
tal invertido, y las sociedades personales, donde el voto se distribuye
personalmente y cada propietario tiene un voto. Este último es el caso
de los clubes, las cooperativas de usuarios o las mutualidades.
Según la teoría de la agencia, los diferentes tipos de organizaciones
surgen por los diferentes incentivos de las partes contratantes y los
diferentes costes de controlar esos incentivos (Jensen y Meckling,
1976). Hansmann (1988) analizó por qué en determinadas situacio-
El objetivo de este
trabajo es conocer
como la forma jurídi-
ca de los equipos de
fútbol, la concentra-
ción de su propiedad y
la nacionalidad de sus
propietarios afectan a
su desempeño.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
41
nes las empresas no eran controladas por capitalistas como ocurre en
la mayoría del tejido empresarial. Así, concluyó que en la mayoría de
ocasiones los proveedores de capital estaban en mejor situación para
ejercer un control efectivo sobre los directivos que el resto de stake-
holders con lo que se minoraban los problemas de agencia. Por el
contrario, Mayers y Smith (1988), exponen que en aquellos sectores
donde resolver el conflicto entre dueños y clientes supone una venta-
ja competitiva, aparecen empresas organizadas como mutualidades
o cooperativas de usuarios.
Por otro lado, la inexistencia de título de propiedad en las sociedades
no capitalistas, hace que los propietarios no estén motivados en pen-
sar a largo plazo y se limiten a aprovechar los derechos que le reporta
en el presente su condición de socio (Nilsson, 2001). Esto provoca
que exista un desincentivo a la inversión y en especial a aquellas in-
versiones cuyos plazos de recuperación sea mayor (Vitaliano, 1983).
Además de su forma jurídica, otras características de la propiedad de
la empresa recogidas en la literatura son el grado de concentración
de la propiedad -si existen un reducido número de accionistas que lo
controlan.
En las grandes empresas, donde la propiedad está diseminada entre
un amplio número de personas, las decisiones son tomadas por di-
rectivos relegando a los accionistas a una labor de supervisión. Pero
llevar a cabo esa supervisión tiene un coste en tiempo y recursos que
hace que los pequeños accionistas tengan pocos incentivos para con-
trolar a unos directivos que cuentan con más información que ellos
(Grossman y Hart, 1980). El control sobre los directivos es un bien pú-
blico que beneficiaría a todos los accionistas, independientemente de
que hubieran asumido el coste de ese control (Stiglitz, 1982). Shleifer
y Vishny (1986) afirman que los grandes accionistas tienen incentivos
para supervisar a los directivos por la importancia económica de su
inversión.
Ante esta situación, una propiedad más concentrada puede supo-
ner un mayor control sobre los directivos, que a su vez redundara en
un mejor desempeño de la empresa. Pero por otro lado se pueden
producir comportamientos oportunistas de los grandes accionistas a
costa de los pequeños (La Porta et al., 1999). Por ejemplo, los gran-
des accionistas pueden imponer como proveedores a sus empresas
a costa de mejores opciones, lo que va en detrimento del valor de la
empresa que comparten con los minoritarios.
PALABRAS CLAVE
Teoría de la Agencia,
Finanzas del
deporte, propietarios
extranjeros, propiedad
concentrada, clubs de
fútbol.
KEY WORDS
Agency Theory,
Sport finance,
foreign ownership,
concentrated
ownership, football
clubs.
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
42
Otro aspecto estudiado, es la nacionalidad de los propietarios. En un
proceso de una mayor globalización en los mercados capitales, cada
vez es más frecuente la presencia de inversores en compañías fuera
de sus países de origen. La literatura académica ha encontrado nu-
merosas evidencias de una relación positiva entre la propiedad forá-
nea de una empresa y su desempeño financiero.
Este fenómeno puede explicarse por un mejor control sobre los direc-
tivos, especialmente cuando se trata de inversiones en países con
escasa protección a los accionistas y débiles estructuras de gobierno
corporativo (civil law countries). De esta manera la participación de
capital foráneo mitiga los problemas de agencia facilitando la trans-
parencia financiera y limitando la discrecionalidad de los directivos.
Otra explicación proviene del hecho de que junto al capital, los inver-
sores foráneos también aportan a las empresas locales el know-how
mediante la transferencia de conocimiento, tecnología y mejores téc-
nicas de gestión (Borensztein et al., 1998).
La literatura ha tratado otras características de la propiedad que han
enriquecido el desarrollo de la teoría de la agencia. La creación de
acciones con distinto poder de voto y de estructuras de propiedad
piramidales afectan a la relación entre principal y agente en el gobier-
no de las empresas como muestran Faccio et al. (2001), Claessens
et alt. (2002) y Lins (2003). A pesar de que dichas estructuras llevan
mucho tiempo presentes en el tejido empresarial, únicamente ha sido
utilizado por el Manchester United cuando en 2012 emitió acciones
con menos derechos. Thomsen y Pedersen (2000) señalaron la im-
portancia de la naturaleza del accionista mayoritario: grupos familia-
res, fondos de inversión, entidades de crédito, etc.
Otro de los aspectos relevantes en la literatura de la teoría de la agen-
cia es la influencia del grado de protección de los derechos de los
accionistas minoritarios. La diferenciación entre países anglosajones
-con un sistema jurídico basado en la common law- frente a países
continentales -con sistema basado en la civil law- ha sido utilizado
en la literatura para explicar ese grado de protección como hicieron
LaPorta et al. (1999) y Maury y Pajuste (2005).
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
43
2.2. La propiedad en el fútbol
2.2.1. Clubes de fútbol y Sociedades Anónimas Deportivas
El fútbol nació como una actividad recreativa por lo que los primeros
equipos se organizaron como clubes, un tipo de sociedad personal
donde cada miembro tiene un voto. El profesionalismo llevó a los
equipos ingleses a convertirse a finales del siglo XIX en sociedades
mercantiles, una personalidad jurídica donde el número de votos de
cada miembro va en función del capital aportado.
Un proceso que continuó en el resto de países cuando se extendió la
idea de que los socios no tenían incentivos para controlar a los direc-
tivos parecía confirmarse al ver como los clubes de fútbol gastaban
por encima de sus posibilidades para obtener resultados deportivos a
corto plazo. Esto motivó que, desde la década de los 80, muchos paí-
ses, entre ellos España, legislaran para convertir los clubes de fútbol
en sociedades anónimas y así lograr unos accionistas que tuvieran
un incentivo para equilibrar financieramente sus equipos. Sin embar-
go, Sánchez et al. (2016a) no encontraron evidencia empírica de la
existencia de una relación entre la forma jurídica de los equipos y su
rendimiento financiero.
2.2.2. Concentración de la propiedad
Cuando pasaron a constituirse como sociedades de capital, algunos
equipos de fútbol fueron controlados por una amplia base de inver-
sores y aficionados. Pero otros muchos de ellos cayeron en manos
de un reducido número de accionistas acabando con la relación exis-
tente entre la propiedad y la base social de los equipos. La evidencia
empírica sobre la influencia de esa concentración de la propiedad en
la rentabilidad financiera de los equipos presenta resultados dispares.
Dimitropoulos y Tsagkanos (2012) analizaron un conjunto heterogé-
neo de equipos europeos y encontraron una relación positiva entre
la propiedad concentrada de los equipos y su rentabilidad financiera.
Por el contrario, Sánchez et al. (2016a) centraron su estudio en los
mayores equipos del continente y encontraron la relación opuesta:
una mayor concentración en la propiedad influía negativamente en la
rentabilidad financiera.
La propiedad de los equipos de fútbol no se ha caracterizado por la
presencia de grupos familiares, siendo la presencia de la dinastía
italiana Agnelli en el Juventus de Turín una excepción. Asimismo la
presencia de fondos de inversión y entidades de crédito en los equi-
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
44
pos de fútbol es residual limitándose a pequeñas participaciones en
aquellos que coticen en bolsa.
Las empresas anglosajonas suelen caracterizarse por tener una es-
tructura de propiedad mucho más dispersa que las empresas de la
Europa continental, donde es más habitual encontrar accionistas que
controlen amplios paquetes accionariales de las compañías. En el
caso del fútbol esa situación es inversa. Mientras en la liga inglesa
abundan los equipos con accionistas de control que dominan amplios
paquetes accionariales, en las ligas continentales es más fácil en-
contrar casos de equipos con una propiedad dispersa en numerosos
socios o pequeños accionistas.
Asimismo mientras en otros sectores las empresas norteamericanas
y británicas comparten un mismo ámbito institucional, en el ámbito
deportivo el contexto institucional norteamericano y británico difiere
notablemente. Por eso los resultados de la literatura en esos sectores
no es trasladable al sector del deporte. En Estados Unidos y Canadá
las competiciones deportivas son organizadas por los propios equi-
pos que participan en ligas cerradas sin ascensos ni descensos y sue-
len compartir parte de los ingresos. Por el contrario en Europa, Reino
Unido incluido, las competiciones están supervisadas por federacio-
nes deportivas y no son propiedad de los equipos. La participación
en las ligas varía en función de resultados deportivos que provocan
ascensos y descensos de categoría. Por esa razón, una hipotética
clasificación mundial de empresas deportivas considerando criterios
institucionales debería diferenciar entre norteamericanas y europeas.
2.2.3. Nacionalidad de la propiedad
En el fútbol se da el caso de que los inversores extranjeros solo parti-
cipan como accionistas de control de una propiedad concentrada. Por
esa estructura particular de la propiedad del fútbol respecto a otros
sectores, no se puede estudiar simultáneamente en un mismo mode-
lo las tres características debido a su fuerte interrelación. Todos los
equipos con una propiedad extranjera son a su vez sociedades de
capital y tienen propiedad concentrada. Asimismo todos los equipos
con propiedad concentrada son sociedades de capital.
La participación de capital extranjero en los equipos de fútbol es un
fenómeno relativamente reciente. Tras su conversión en sociedades
de capital, nada impedia que los equipos pudieran pasar a manos
foráneas. No obstante, en un primer momento la nacionalidad de los
propietarios coincidió con la del equipo. La creciente generación de
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
45
ingresos de los equipos, tanto en derechos de televisión como en pa-
trocinios, y que su repercusión mediática desboradará las fronteras
nacionales ha atraído capital extranjero a las principales ligas euro-
peas.
La evidencia empírica no es concluyente respecto a la influencia de
la internacionalización de la propiedad de los equipos. Wilson et al.
(2013) no encontraron relación entre la nacionalidad de los propie-
tarios de un equipo de la English Premier League y su rentabilidad
financiera. Por otro lado, Sánchez et al. (2016a) sí encontraron una
relación estadísticamente significativa en una muestra de equipos eu-
ropeos. En su caso, la presencia de propietarios extranjeros afectaba
negativamente a la rentabilidad de los equipos.
Wilson et al. (2013) hallaron que la propiedad extranjera de un equipo
influía en sus resultados deportivos en la liga inglesa. Sin embargo,
su investigación no consideró el tamaño de los equipos, característica
que influye enormemente en los resultados deportivos como habían
detectado Hoehn y Szymanski (1999). Por esa razón se pudo haber
producido un error de sesgo ya que si los inversores extranjeros in-
vierten en los equipos de mayor tamaño estos, de por sí, obtendrán
mejores resultados deportivos.
2.2.4. Cotización en mercados de valores
La mayoría de literatura académica sobre la influencia de la propie-
dad de las empresas se ha centrado en empresas cotizadas. Pero
en el sector del fútbol, una minoría de equipos cotizan en los merca-
dos de valores. Este es un aspecto importante porque el grado de
protección de los accionistas minoritarios depende notablemente del
hecho de que el equipo cotice o no en un mercado de valores, dada
la protección jurídica de la que disfrutan los accionistas minoritarios
en ese caso. Los accionistas minoritarios de equipos no cotizados
sufren mayores dificultades para poder ejercer un control sobre los
gestores. Por esa razón, ese grado de protección se incorpora al pre-
sente trabajo mediante la variable que indica si el equipo cotiza o no
en el mercado de valores para estudiar su influencia en la calidad de
la gestión de los equipos.
Aunque a priori se pueda plantear que el principal objetivo de los
equipos cotizados en bolsa sería la maximización del valor de sus
accionistas en función de sus resultados financieros, los estudios
empíricos han mostrado una tendencia diferente. Zuber et al. (2005)
hallaron que la cotización de los equipos no respondía a su situación
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
46
financiera como ocurría en otros sectores. La literatura académica ha
mostrado, hasta ahora, que la influencia del hecho de cotizar en bolsa
se ha mostrado nula tanto sobre el rendimiento financiero (Leah y
Szymanski, 2015) como en el rendimiento deportivo (Baur y McKea-
ting, 2011) de los equipos.
3. LA EFICIENCIA COMO MEDIDA DEL DESEMPEÑO
MULTIOBJETIVO
Norh (1990) definió las empresas como agrupaciones de individuos
que se unían para lograr determinados propósitos, que resultarían
más fácilmente alcanzables de manera colectiva que individual gra-
cias a la existencia de una estructura jerárquica y unas relaciones
contractuales estables en el tiempo con el resto de agentes. Siguien-
do esta definición, el objetivo de las empresas no es otro que lograr
los objetivos perseguidos por sus propietarios.
En la teoría clásica de la empresa se identifica ese objetivo con la
maximización del capital invertido por los propietarios. Pero en el ám-
bito empresarial podemos encontrarnos con una situación más com-
pleja. La decisión de inversión, como cualquier otra decisión humana,
está dirigida a obtener un incremento de la satisfacción. Un mayor
rendimiento monetario supone un incremento de la satisfacción del
inversor pero también pueden existir otras recompensas o dividen-
dos emocionales que hagan incrementar la utilidad obtenida. Sán-
chez (2012) detalla algunos casos como la satisfacción por participar
en una empresa familiar que suponga mantener un legado recibido
de generaciones anteriores o la de participar en empresas de medios
de comunicación que supongan una satisfacción por su capacidad
de influencia en la opinión pública y en las decisiones políticas. Estas
satisfacciones incrementarán la utilidad obtenida por el rendimiento
monetario de la inversión (Gráfico 1).
El fútbol es uno de los sectores donde se puede encontrar ese di-
videndo emocional. Los primeros equipos ingleses profesionales se
constituyeron como sociedades de capital. La propia legislación re-
cogía que su objetivo era doble “profit and glory”, la búsqueda de be-
neficios y éxitos deportivos. Fue en la década de los ochenta cuando
se equiparó la figura mercantil de los equipos de fútbol al resto de
empresas para permitirles cotizar en bolsa y se eliminaron las restric-
ciones al reparto de beneficios.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
47
Esto no ha eliminado el debate en la literatura sobre cuál es el obje-
tivo de los equipos de fútbol. Mientras algunos trabajos, como los de
El-Hodiri y Quirk (1971), Fort y Quirk (1995) y Szymanski y Késenne
(2004), asumen que el objetivo de los equipos deportivos es la maxi-
mización del beneficio al igual que en cualquier otro negocio. Otros
autores, como Sloane (1971) o Morrow (2003), sostienen que en Eu-
ropa los clubes buscan la maximización de la utilidad a través de los
resultados deportivos considerando unas restricciones financieras.
El debate en sí podría resultar inabordable e incluso se podría tras-
ladar al resto de sectores. Kang y Sorensen (1999) argumentan que
los accionistas no son homogéneos y pueden tener comportamientos
diferentes y distintos objetivos o incentivos. Muchas veces se tiende
a asumir implícitamente que los accionistas son monolíticos y todos
persiguen los mismos objetivos. Pero en realidad no tiene por qué
ser así. En un mismo sector pueden coincidir inversores con distintas
motivaciones.
En el caso del fútbol cuando Volkswagen invierte en el Vfl Wolfsburgo
o la familia Agnelli en el Juventus de Turín, les puede motivar lograr
una relación de cercanía con la comunidad. Algo que no se puede
trasladar a las motivaciones que los hermanos Glazer tuvieron al
adquirir el Manchester United. Ante una multiplicidad de objetivos,
la estimación de los coeficientes de eficiencia nos permite medir el
desempeño de los gestores y poder comparar distintos equipos. El
estudio de la eficiencia permite evaluar el grado de alcance de los ob-
jetivos planteados sujetos a la restricción de unos recursos limitados.
Los ratios solo permiten comparar dos variables, con lo que el output
debe ser unitario. Por el contrario, el estudio de la eficiencia permite
considerar varios outputs. Mediante fronteras definidas por la eficien-
cia relativa de unidades homogéneas denominadas Decision Making
Units (DMU) -que en este caso son los equipos de fútbol- se identifica
cual es ‘el mejor comportamiento’ realizado por las DMUs eficientes
Gráfico 1. Utilidad de la inversión en un equipo de fútbol
UTILIDAD DE LA
INVERSIÓN
RENTABILIDAD
FINANCIERA
SATISFACCIÓN POR
RENDIMIENTO
DEPORTIVO
= +
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
48
que definirá la frontera de buenas prácticas consistente en maximizar
los objetivos de los accionistas (outputs) con unas dotaciones dadas
de factores (inputs). El resto de equipos no situados en la frontera
serán tanto más ineficientes cuanto más alejados estén de la frontera
marcando esa distancia el aumento que deben aplicar a sus outputs
con los inputs disponibles.
Ese comportamiento será mejor cuanto mejores sean cada uno de
los outputs. Si consideramos que los propietarios de los equipos de
fútbol ven aumentada su satisfacción por la rentabilidad y por los éxi-
tos deportivo, ninguno de ellos hacen disminuir la utilidad. En el caso
de un inversor que invierta solo por su satisfacción emocional, el in-
cremento del valor económico de su equipo por obtener una mayor
rentabilidad financiera no le supondrá una menor satisfacción o utili-
dad. Y a la inversa, aunque solo busque rentabilizar su inversión, la
obtención de éxitos deportivos no le supondrá perjuicio. Así podemos
comparar la gestión de los equipos sin estar sujetos a un solo output.
La escasa literatura previa sobre la influencia de la propiedad en la
gestión de los equipos de fútbol se ha centrado en la rentabilidad
financiera como medida de la calidad de la gestión como es habitual
en los estudios de otros sectores. Pero eso supone obviar la natura-
leza de los equipos de fútbol como empresas multiobjetivo. Existen
un elevado número de propietarios en el fútbol que no buscan una
retribución monetaria a su inversión por lo que no tiene sentido el uso
de la rentabilidad financiera como proxy de la utilidad de la inversión.
Cambiar ese objetivo por la obtención de éxitos deportivos supone
una excesiva simplificación cuando también existen numerosos in-
versores con objetivos financieros. Por eso si deseamos estudiar la
calidad de la gestión de los equipos de fútbol tenemos que tener en
cuenta esa singularidad y buscar otra medida de la utilidad obtenida
por los propietarios de la gestión de los directivos. Es por esta razón
que el presente trabajo utiliza el coeficiente de eficiencia obtenido en
alcanzar los distintos objetivos de los propietarios como medida de
utilidad de la inversión como detallaremos en el siguiente apartado.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
49
4. UN ESTUDIO PARA LOS PRINCIPALES EQUIPOS DE
FÚTBOL EUROPEOS
4.1. Muestra
Para el presente estudio se ha tomado una muestra que incluye a
los principales equipos de fútbol europeos. A diferencia de Estados
Unidos donde el deporte profesional se desarrolla en ligas cerradas,
las principales competiciones europeas, la Champions y Europa
League de la UEFA, no tiene prestablecidos a priori sus participantes
que se clasificarán en función de los resultados en la temporada
previa en sus competiciones nacionales. A pesar de ese carácter
teóricamente abierto, en la práctica una serie de equipos participan
regularmente en la competición y configuran un grupo que domina
el deporte en el continente gracias a contar con unos recursos
económicos superiores al resto.
Para hallar los equipos con mayor potencial se ha partido de la lista
que cada año elabora la consultora Deloitte denominada “Football
Money League” que incluye los 20 equipos con más ingresos del
continente de cada año. El período estudiado comprende desde el
año 2010 hasta el año 2013 en los que contamos con todos los datos
de la muestra dado que al trabajar con coeficientes de eficiencia
las muestras deben estar balanceadas. Se han escogido aquellos
equipos que más veces han estado presentes en la lista de Deloitte.
La muestra resultante está compuesta por 22 equipos, un número
similar al de muchas competiciones ligueras nacionales por lo que
se trata de una muestra comparable a la mayoría de trabajos sobre
el sector que se basan en las competiciones de un país concreto.
La muestra escogida no solo es representativa de los equipos
de los equipos más poderosos económicamente sino también
deportivamente. Las finales de la Champions League de los últimos
diez años han sido protagonizados por equipos de la muestra
(presentados en la tabla 1) Aunque los ingresos que proporcionan
las competiciones de la UEFA cada vez son más importantes, las
ligas de los mayores países son las que obtienes unos mayores
ingresos por derechos de televisión y competición. Seis equipos
pertenecen a la liga más potente financieramente, la Premier inglesa.
Cinco del resto de los equipos provienen de la liga italiana, cuatro
de la alemana, tres por la española y otros tres por la francesa.
Completa la lista el Galatasary turco. Los equipos estudiados se
pueden encontrar en el gráfico 2 donde se pueden apreciar aquellos
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
50
controlados por socios o por accionistas minoritarios frente a los
que cuentan con accionistas de control. Cabe indicar que aquellos
equipos donde la totalidad de los derechos de voto están en manos
de minoritarios corresponden a los organizados como clubes.
Asimismo solo los equipos con accionistas de control extranjeros
están en manos foráneas. En el resto, sus propietarios, de control o
dispersos, son de la misma nacionalidad que el equipo,
Gráfico 2. Equipos que forman parte de la muestra estudiada y su estructura
de propiedad
4.2. Metodología y variables
Para estudiar la relación entre las diferentes estructuras de
propiedad de los equipos de fútbol y sus coeficientes de eficiencia
utilizaremos el método de la regresión Tobit mediante datos de
panel, también denominado regresión censurada porque delimita los
posibles valores de la variable dependiente entre un límite máximo
y otro mínimo. Este método ha sido ampliamente utilizado en el
análisis de segunda etapa de eficiencia debido a que los coeficientes
DEA presentan unos valores acotados entre 0 y 1 como detalla
Hoff (2007). En este caso, los coeficientes obtenidos se interpretan
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
51
fácilmente y son similares a los obtenidos con Mínimos Cuadrados
Ordinarios (MCO).
Se estudia el efecto de cada una de las tres características de la
propiedad en el desempeño financiero y deportivo (ver gráfico 1),
medido por el coeficiente obtenido en el DEA, en tres modelos
diferentes.
Como se detalló en el punto anterior, el estudio de la eficiencia permite
conocer el grado de consecución de los objetivos de los propietarios
que en el caso del fútbol puede incluir aspectos financieros y
emocionales-deportivos. Como proxy del objetivo financiero se ha
tomado el beneficio contable como output y las pérdidas como input,
Para aproximar el objetivo deportivo se ha empleado el coeficiente
UEFA ponderado. Dicho coeficiente refleja el éxito deportivo de cada
equipo en las competiciones continentales calculado por la propia
UEFA y se ha ponderado los resultados de la Champions League
el doble que los de la Europa League por la mayor importancia de
la competición. Como input utilizaremos el activo total dado que
no se puede utilizar los fondos propios pues varios equipos los
tienen negativos y esto desvirtuaría los resultados. La estimación
se realiza con orientación input, dado su importancia al suponer las
pérdidas una pérdida del valor patrimonial de los equipos. Aunque
los resultados con orientación output son prácticamente idénticos.
Similares inputs y outputs han sido utilizados en estudios sobre
eficiencia en el fútbol como Sánchez (2006) y Sánchez et al. (2016b).
La estimación se ha realizado mediante la técnica de rendimientos
constantes a escala dado que a los equipos de fútbol les resulta
complejo cambiar significativamente de tamaño en el corto plazo.
Los coeficientes de eficiencia estimados se pueden encontrar en la
Tabla 1 y un resumen de las variables utilizadas aparece en la Tabla
2.
Cada modelo tendrá como variable explicativa una de esas
características. Así, estos serán los tres modelos considerados:
1. Figura jurídica: la variable explicativa será una dummy que nos
indicará si un equipo está constituido como club con valor 1, en
vez de como sociedad de capital que tomaría un valor 0.
2. Concentración de la propiedad: en este caso la variable
explicativa será el porcentaje de derechos de voto controlados
por los dos mayores accionistas. En la mayoría de casos el
control del equipo es ejercido por un único gran accionista y
en aquellos casos en los que existen dos grandes accionistas,
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
52
como por ejemplo el Atlético de Madrid, la gestión es compartida
por ambos no dándose el caso del incentivo al control
expuesto por Maury y Pajuste (2005) y López-de-Foronda. et
al. (2007). El uso de ese porcentaje nos permite conocer no
solo la influencia de la existencia de un accionista mayoritario
sino también incorporar los incentivos a comportarse
oportunistamente que varían en función del mayor o menor
grado participación en el capital como indican De Miguel et
al. (2004) . El menor grado de concentración corresponderá a
los clubes donde los derechos de voto están muy repartidos
mientras en el otro extremo aparecen los equipos donde uno o
dos accionistas controlan la totalidad del capital.
3. Nacionalidad de la propiedad: la variable será una dummy nos
indicará si la mayoría de propietarios de los equipos son de la
Tabla 1. Coeficientes de eficiencia de los equipos que
forman parte de la muestra
EQUIPO 2010 2011 2012 2013
AC Milan 47.60 29.74 38.59 48.51
Arsenal 38.15 25.20 38.84 19.61
Atlético 24.80 5.71 19.13 8.78
F.C. Barcelona 77.91 100.00 75.33 49.33
Bayern 100.00 44.15 44.74 62.38
Borussia 64.76 62.23 100.00 71.52
Chelsea 59.25 35.71 38.69 24.94
City Manchester 0.00 7.33 6.23 9.27
Galatasaray 31.40 11.57 0.00 100.00
Hamburgo 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Inter 77.26 28.52 17.45 22.35
Juventus 29.17 6.11 0.00 55.46
Liverpool 44.36 12.85 0.00 18.65
Napoli 99.89 93.88 100.00 22.21
O Lyonnais 100.00 46.33 38.66 28.17
O Marseille 84.60 100.00 100.00 29.04
PSG 0.00 94.37 9.91 4.85
R. Madrid 100.00 45.10 50.01 30.86
Roma 42.15 100.00 2.77 0.00
Schalke 04 57.70 100.00 21.50 73.56
Tottenham 0.00 68.04 7.65 25.23
United Manchester 28.76 32.70 21.49 13.83
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
53
misma nacionalidad que el propio equipo con un valor 1. Esta
diferencia es muy nítida dado que aquellos que cuentan con
una mayoría de la propiedad en manos de inversores foráneos,
estos siempre controlan más del 80% del capital.
Además los tres modelos incorporan variables de control. Por una
parte, se introducen variables dummies temporales con el objetivo
de capturar potenciales efectos macroeconómicos que afecten
al conjunto de empresas analizadas. Por otro lado, se ha incluido
también una dummy que refleje si el equipo tiene sus acciones
cotizando en un mercado de valores organizado y, por tanto,
existe una mayor protección en los derechos de los accionistas
minoritarios. Asimismo la información relativa al tamaño y a los
resultados financieros y deportivos ya está incorporado al modelo en
el cálculo previo de los coeficientes de eficiencia.
Tabla 2. Resumen de las variables utilizadas
VARIABLE OBS. MEDIA DESV.
TÍPICA MÍNIMO MÁXIMO
Coeciente UEFA 88 13.17 10.50 0.00 34.00 Output
Benecio 88 9,494.08 287,413.53 0,00 172,444.00 Output
Pérdidas 88 22,029.90 23,158.99 0.00 227,636.00 Input
Activo 88 413,321.29 36,494.97 36,087.00 1,317,081.00 Input
Coef. Eciencia 88 0.70 0.46 0.00 1.00 Vb.
Dependiente
Club 88 0.18 0.69 0.00 1.00 V b .
Independiente
Concentración 88 0.66 0.39 0.01 1.00 Vb.
Independiente
Nacional 88 0.70 0.46 0.00 1.00 V b .
Independiente
Bolsa 88 0.27 0.45 0.00 1.00 V b .
Independiente
4.3. Resultados
En la tabla 3 se muestran los resultados obtenidos en el análisis. Los
tres modelos detectan una influencia de la estructura de propiedad
en el desempeño de los equipos con una significación estadística
global. Por el contrario la cotización o no en bolsa parece no afectar
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
54
al desempeño de los equipos. El efecto de la propiedad muestra
que en aquellas estructuras donde resulta más difícil el control
de los directivos, el desempeño de los equipos es mejor. Así los
resultados del análisis nos indican que el desempeño de un equipo
organizado como club es mejor que aquellos que son sociedades
de capital. De manera similar los resultados muestran que el grado
de concentración de la propiedad tiene una relación negativa con el
desempeño. Esta relación también aparece cuando sustituimos ese
grado de concentración por una dummy que establezca si hay o no
accionistas de referencia con más de la mitad de los derechos de
voto. La nacionalidad de los propietarios muestra tener una relación
estadísticamente significativa con los coeficientes obtenidos. Así
aquellos equipos cuyos propietarios son del mismo país que el
equipo logran un mejor desempeño que aquellos controlados por
inversores foráneos.
Tabla 3. Resultados de la Estimación
MODELOS
(1)
PERSONALIDAD
JURÍDICA
(2)
CONCENTRACIÓN
DE LA PROPIEDAD
(3)
NACIONALIDAD DE
LA PROPIEDAD
Club 0.195**
(0.116)
Concentración de la
propiedad
-0.251**
(0.104)
Propietarios nacionales 0.226***
(0.084)
Cotiza en bolsa 0.031
(0.094)
-0.023
(0.086)
-0.038
(0.084)
Dummies temporales
Constante 0.505***
(0.076)
0.719***
(0.097)
0.385***
(0.092)
Wald Chi2 12.65** 15.69*** 16.79***
Observaciones 88 88 88
El error estándar se presenta entre paréntesis.
***, ** y * indican niveles de signicatividad estadística del 1%, 5% y 10%, respectivamente.
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
55
5. CONCLUSIONES E IMPLICACIONES PRÁCTICAS
Desde el desarrollo de la teoría de la agencia, existe una preocupa-
ción sobre el efecto que pueden tener la propiedad en el rendimien-
to de las empresas. La separación entre propiedad y control de las
grandes empresas hace que puedan surgir ineficiencias en la gestión
por lo que a priori podría considerarse que cuanta mayor capacidad
tengan los propietarios de supervisar a los directivos mejor.
Las asunción clásica de que las decisiones de los inversores tiene
objetivos homogéneos no corresponde en ocasiones a la realidad.
Una mayor rentabilidad siempre supone una mayor utilidad, pero los
inversores pueden obtener una mayor satisfacción también por otros
outputs de la empresa. A pesar de que su conversión en sociedades
de capital y su participación en los mercados de valores, la inversión
en equipos de fútbol proporciona una satisfacción adicional por el
dividendo emocional de verse ligado en los éxitos deportivos.
Cuando nos encontramos ante la consecución de diferentes objeti-
vos, la medida de los coeficientes de eficiencia nos proporciona in-
formación sobre el desempeño de la empresa respecto a las de su
sector. Asimismo la eficiencia nos permite poder tener en cuenta la
persecución de varios outputs de manera simultánea y complemen-
taria. Por esa razón hemos utilizado los coeficientes de eficiencia es-
timados teniendo en cuenta objetivos financieros y deportivos como
proxy del desempeño de los equipos.
El presente estudio de la influencia de las estructuras de propiedad
del fútbol europeo muestran unos resultados que pueden resultar
una aportación interesante al desarrollo de la teoría de la agencia por
su singularidad respecto a trabajos realizados en otros sectores. Se
ha detectado una relación positiva entre equipos organizados como
clubes y su desempeño. Los socios de un club de fútbol apenas tie-
nen capacidad e incentivos para controlar a los directivos. No reciben
ningún beneficio monetario de su participación del club y en cual-
quier momento pueden decidir no renovar su compromiso con el club
dejando de pagar su cuota anual. Asimismo su capacidad de influir
es ínfima dado su elevado número y que cada uno de ellos apenas
cuenta con un voto individual. A pesar de que esa es una situación
perfecta para que los directivos se dedicaran a perseguir sus propios
objetivos a costa de los intereses de los propietarios de los equipos
que dirigen, organizarse como club tiene una relación positiva con la
eficiencia en la consecución de los objetivos de la organización.
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
56
De manera similar, los resultados muestran que una mayor concen-
tración de la propiedad tiene una influencia negativa en el desempe-
ño de los equipos. Eso a pesar de que una propiedad más dispersa
tiene una mayor dificultad para supervisar a los directivos que cuan-
do el equipo está controlado por grandes accionistas.
¿Por qué se puede producir este efecto en el fútbol? El hecho del
carácter de club tenga una influencia positiva podría provenir de la
posible mejor resolución del conflicto entre dueños-clientes, al con-
fluir ambos en un mercado más maduro que puede ser una ventaja
competitiva si ese conflicto es más relevante que el existente entre
dueños-aportantes de capital. Pero esa relación positiva con el des-
empeño también se encuentra cuando consideramos todos los equi-
pos con propiedad dispersa, tanto los clubes como las sociedades de
capital con amplia base accionarial.
Los beneficios de una mayor distancia entre la toma de decisiones y
los afectados/beneficiados por esas decisiones ya fue defendido en
la ciencia política que ha postulado las ventajas de la democracia re-
presentativa o indirecta sobre la asamblearia o directa. Una distancia
que fue reafirmada a principios del siglo XIX cuando la cámara britá-
nica rechazó que las promesas realizadas por los diputados fueran
de obligado cumplimiento. Los defensores de la democracia repre-
sentativa defienden esa mayor discrecionalidad como la fórmula para
equilibrar los diferentes intereses y lograr decisiones más consisten-
tes a largo plazo.
En ocasiones esa discrecionalidad de los directivos se interpreta
como capacidad de los directivos para extraer rentas extras. En el
caso del fútbol esa distancia resulta adecuada para obtener un mejor
desempeño. La necesidad de tener que rendir cuentas más inmedia-
tas al tener una supervisión más directa de los propietarios puede re-
sultar contradictoria en el sector del fútbol profesional. La capacidad
de tomar decisiones que vayan a ser evaluadas a un mayor plazo,
por ser más difícil su sustitución por una propiedad más dispersa,
proporciona una ventaja competitiva que se traslada en un mejor des-
empeño.
Pero la teoría de la agencia también nos indica que existe el peligro
de que los grandes accionistas aprovechen su situación para extraer
rentas extraordinarias o llevar a cabo una gestión menos profesio-
nalizada. Esto supondría un peor desempeño del equipo y un perjui-
cio para los accionistas minoritarios como indican los resultados del
presente trabajo. En los equipos con una propiedad dispersa esos
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
57
accionistas minoritarios pueden coincidir con los aficionados. Así, es-
tos también se verían perjudicados en el caso de los equipos en que
no participaran en el capital. Otros stakeholders que pueden verse
perjudicados son las administraciones públicas que acostumbran a
beneficiar a los equipos con elevadas ayudas como patrocinios, sub-
venciones o mantenimiento de estadios municipales.
En el caso de la nacionalidad, la explicación de la literatura acadé-
mica para esa relación proviene de que los propietarios extranjeros
no solo aportan capital a las empresas que participan sino también
incorporan el know-how que les ha reportado éxito en su mercado de
origen y lo implantan en sus participadas. En el caso del fútbol euro-
peo algunos de los inversores extranjeros no tenían experiencia en el
sector mientras otros lo tenían pero en el mercado norteamericano,
mucho más desarrollado que el europeo pero unas características
muy diferentes (ligas cerradas, topes salariales, etc.).
Estas conclusiones tienen implicaciones prácticas en el debate exis-
tente sobre el papel de las normativas sobre estructuras de propie-
dad en el fútbol europeo. Unos países han incentivado u obligado a
los equipos a convertirse en sociedades de capital y facilitado que
cayeran en manos de un reducido número de propietarios. Por el
contrario, otros países han puesto impedimentos a la concentración
con lo que a su vez dificultan la llegada de inversores foráneos. Los
primeros buscaban una mejor gestión gracias al mayor control que
realizarían los accionistas en base a la teoría de agencia, algo que no
se ve correspondido con el resultado del presente trabajo.
Asimismo los deseos que expresan muchos aficionados de que sus
equipos pasen a estar controlados por potentados extranjeros se
muestra como una solución incorrecta, dado los mejores resultados
obtenidos precisamente por los equipos con propietarios nacionales
y controlados por una amplia base de propietarios.
Los resultados obtenidos pueden suponer una aportación al desarro-
llo de la teoría de la agencia en el ámbito de empresas donde cohabi-
ten distintos objetivos, haciendo su gestión más compleja y difícil de
evaluar. Futuras investigaciones deberán confirmar o rebatir en qué
otros tipo de empresa se producen efectos similares y cuál puede ser
el elemento común.
¿JUEGA AL FÚTBOL LA TEORÍA DE LA AGENCIA?
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
58
REFERENCIAS
Baur, D. G., y McKeating, C. (2011). Do Football Clubs Benefit from Initial Public Offerings?
International Journal of Sport Finance, 6(1), 40-59.
Borensztein, E., De Gregorio, J., y Lee, J. W. (1998). How does foreign direct investment
affect economic growth? Journal of international Economics, 45(1), 115-135.
Claessens, S., Djankov, S., Fan, J., y Lang, L. (2002). Disentangling the Incentive and
Entrenchment Effects of Large Shareholdings. Journal of Finance(57), 2741-2771.
De Miguel, A., Pindado, J., y de la Torre, C. (2004). Ownership structure and firm value: new
evidence from Spain. Strategic Management Journal, 25(12), 1199-1207.
Dimitropoulos, P., y Tsagkanos, A. (2012). Financial perfomance and corporate governance in
the European football industry. International Journal of Sport Finance, 7(4), 280-308.
El-Hodiri, M. y Quirk, J. (1971). An economic model of a professional sports league. The
Journal of Political Economy, 1302-1319
Faccio, L., Lang, L., y Young, L. (2001). Dividends and Expropriation. American Economic
Review(91), 54-78.
Fort, R. y Quirk, J. (1995). Cross-subsidization, incentives, and outcomes in professional
team sports leagues. Journal of Economic Literature, 33(3), 1265-1299.
Grossman, S. J., y Hart, O. D. (1980). Takeover bids, the free-rider problem, and the theory of
the corporation. The Bell Journal of Economics, 11(1), 42-64.
Hansmann, H. (1988). Ownership of the Firm. Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization,
4(2), 267-304.
Hoff, A. (2007). Second stage DEA: Comparison of approaches for modelling the DEA score.
European Journal of Operational Research, 181(1), 425-435.
Hoehn, T., y Szymanski, S. (1999). The Americanization of European football. Economic
Policy, 28, 205-240.
Jensen, M., y Meckling, W. (1976). Theory of the firm: managerial behavior, agency costs and
Ownership structure. Journal of Financial Economics, 3, 305-360.
Kang, D. L., y Sorensen, A. B. (1999). Ownership organization and firm performance. Annual
review of sociology, v.25, 121-144
La Porta, R., Lopez-de-Silanes, F., y Shleifer, A. (1999). Corporate ownership around the
world. Journal of Financial Economics(54 (2)), 471-517.
Leah, S., y Szymanski, S. (2015). Making money out of football. Scottish Journal of Politica
Economy, 62(1), 25-50.
Lins, K. V. (2003). Equity Ownership and Firm Value in Emerging. Journal of Financial and
Quantitative Analysis(38), 159-184.
López-de-Foronda, Ó., López-Iturriaga, F. J. and Santamaría-Mariscal, M. (2007), Ownership
Structure, Sharing of Control and Legal Framework: international evidence. Corporate
Governance: An International Review, 15 (6): 1130–1143.
Maury, B., y Pajuste, A. (2005). Multiple large shareholders and firm value. Journal of Banking
y Finance, 29(7), 1813-1834.
Mayers, D., y Smith, C. (1988). Ownership structure across lines of poverty casualty
insurance. Journal of Law and Economics(31), 357-378.
Morrow, S. (2003). The people’s game?: football, finance and society. London: Palgrave
Macmillan.
Nilsson, J. (2001). Organisational Principles for Co-operative firms. Scandinavian Journal of
Management(17), 329-356.
North, D. C. (1990). Institutions, institutional change and economic performance. Cambridge :
Cambridge university press.
Sanchez, L. C. (2006). ¿ Son compatibles el” bolsillo” y el” corazón”? El caso de las
sociedades anónimas deportivas españolas. Estudios Financieros. Revista de Contabilidad y
Tributación, 283, 131-164.
Sánchez, L.C. (2012). Dividendo emocional: el papel de los accionistas en la responsabilidad
empresarial. Revista de responsabilidad social de la empresa, 12, 15-45.
Sánchez, L. C., Sánchez-Fernández, P., y Barajas, Á. (2016a). Estructuras de propiedad y
rentabilidad financiera en el fútbol europeo. Journal of Sports Economics y Management,
6(1), 5-17.
Sánchez, L.C.; Sánchez-Fernández, P. y Barajas, A. (2016b). Objetivos financieros y
deportivos en la eficiencia del fútbol europeo, Revista de Psicología del Deporte, 25 (3),
47-50
LUIS CARLOS SÁNCHEZ, ÁNGEL BARAJAS & PATRICIO SÁNCHEZFERNÁNDEZ
UNIVERSIA BUSINESS REVIEW | PRIMER TRIMESTRE 2017 | ISSN: 1698-5117
59
Shleifer, A., y Vishny, R. W. (1986). Large shareholders and corporate control. The Journal of
Political Economy, 94(3), 461-488.
Sloane, P. (1971). The Economics of Professional Football: the football club as a utility
maximizer. Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 17(2), 121-145.
Stiglitz, J. (1982). Ownership, Control and Efficient Markets: Some Paradoxes in the Theory
of Capital Markets. En K. Boyer, y W. Shepherd, Economic Regulation: Essays in honor of
James R. Nelson (págs. 311-321). Ann Arbor: Michigan University Press.
Szymanski, S y Késenne, S. (2004). Competitive balance and gate revenue sharing in team
sports. The Journal of Industrial Economics, 52(1), 165-177.Thomsen, S., y Pedersen, T.
(2000). Ownership structure and economic perfomance in the largest European companies.
Strategic Management Journal, 21(6), 689-705.
Vitaliano, P. (1983). Cooperative enterprise: An alternative conceptual basis for analyzing a
complex institution. American Journal of Agricultural Economics(65), 1078-1083.
Wilson, R., Plumley, D., y Ramchandani, G. (2013). The relationship between ownership
and club perfomance in the English Premier League. Sport, Business and Management: An
International Journal, 3(1), 19-36.
Zuber, R., Yiu, P., Lamb, R. P., y Gandar, J. M. (2005). Investor-fans? An examination of the
perfomance of publicly traded English Premier League teams. Applied Financial Economics,
15(5), 305-313.
NOTAS
1. Agradecimientos: Los autores quieren agradecer los comentarios detallados y enriquece-
dores de los revisores anónimos así como el trabajo de los dos editores que han intervenido
en el proceso. Angel Barajas agradece la financiación recibida de la National Research
Uni- versity Higher School of Economics en su Basic Research Program.
2. Autor de contacto: Facultad de Ciencias Empresariales y Turismo; Universidad de Vigo;
Campus Universitario; 32004-Ourense; SPAIN
... Rohde and Breuer (2017) show the coexistence of teams with dispersed and concentrated ownership in European football. Thus, Sanchez, Barajas, and Sánchez-Fernández (2017) identified an alternative approach. Clubs do not have objectives per se; a club's objectives depend on who the team owner is. ...
... Managers can accumulate debt if they overspend to invest in better players. Moreover, Sanchez et al. (2017) detected that teams with dispersed ownership obtained better combined sport and financial performance. Greater managerial discretion allows for the balancing of different interests, something relevant in industries where relations with stakeholders are very important, such as football, and making more consistent long-term decisions. ...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between profitability and sporting performance in European football. Profitability has been rarely studied because it has not been considered an aim of European clubs, in contrast with American clubs. However, the emergence of investors who invest on both sides of the Atlantic shows that the objectives of owners can be diverse and that profitability has to be taken into account. The study of the compatibility or incompatibility of sporting performance and profitability has implications for the existence of clubs with owners with different objectives in the same competition, or even owners with different aims in the same club. The paper finds that financial performance has a negative influence on clubs’ sporting performance, while sporting performance does not have a negative influence on profitability. Moreover, ownership concentration has a negative influence on both performance variables. These findings show that the pursuit of sport success could undermine the profitability and sustainability of clubs and that investors could focus less on sport results and focus more on maximizing the financial returns on their investments. Full text available free: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2444883419301639?via%3Dihub
... Other authors, such as Szymanski and Kuypers (1999), Morrow (1999), Gerrard andDobson (2000), Késenne (2006), Zimbalist (2003), and Ascari and Gagnepain (2006), have assumed that clubs' owners look for other non-monetary motivations, usually emotional rewards that are linked to sporting success. Sanchez et al. (2017) revealed a new possibility pointing out that the objective of the clubs would depend on the identity of owners. In this way, some owners would buy a club to obtain profitability from their investments while others would buy it to obtain emotional satisfaction. ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The aim of this paper is to determine whether football clubs are valued according to financial parameters, as in other profit-seeking investments, or depending on the subjective preference of the buyers, in situations where buyers seek emotional rewards or a status symbol. Design: This work analyses a unique data set of the prices of actual transactions of shares from clubs in the big European leagues from 2001 until 2019. A theoretical model is presented introducing financial, sporting, and localisation variables to study their influence in market value. Findings: We have found that the valuation of football clubs in acquisitions is influenced by financial parameters, as in other profit seeking investments, and does not depend on the subjective preference of the buyers. Practical implications: Our findings show the end of the alignment of interests between new football owners and fans or current organisers of competitions, due to the preferences of the new investor profit-seekers of an American model of sport. Research contributions: The ownership of football clubs in the big leagues has changed dramatically in the last years. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the present paper demonstrates the opportunity of analysing the valuations of the football industry with actual data from the transactions. Keywords: sport economics, football, valuation, firm ownership, sport management, investment
... Nevertheless, it must be remembered that profitability is not one the primary objectives of sports clubs. Sánchez et al. ( 2017) have noticed that a large number of club owners does not seek monetary compensation for their investments, therefore there is no point in considering profitability as an indicator of investment utility. The authors suggest substituting it with a coefficient of efficiency as a measure of investment utility that takes into account the degree to which the different objectives of the owner have been achieved, including sports success. ...
... Other studies have analysed the economic and sporting dimensions simultaneously in defining their outputs. Specifically, Haas (2003a), Guzmán and Morrow (2007) and Jardin (2009) included the same outputs, points won in a season and total revenue (turnover), while Sánchez et al. (2017) included a weighted version of clubs' UEFA coefficient and accounting profit. ...
Article
Full-text available
Previous works that have analysed the efficiency of the management of professional football clubs have not paid much attention to the interaction between the sporting, social and economic dimensions of their activity. To bridge this research gap, a DEA model is developed and applied to determine the relative efficiency of clubs participating in one of the main football leagues while taking into account their multiplicity of objectives. The proposed two-stage relational network DEA model assumes that the financial resources of the clubs are distributed between social and sporting dimensions, contributing to generate results in both areas that, in the second stage, determine the business performance of the clubs. As the actual distributions of the primary inputs are unknown, two complementary approaches are used. First, the model is solved by assuming a parameterization of the distribution. Then, a simulation model is used to study the effect of the different distributions on the efficiency by means of contour charts. A final cluster analysis completes the study. The sample consists of the 20 clubs that played in Spain’s First Division in the 2016–17 season. The evidence shows that the efficiency of the clubs increases when a higher proportion of the primary inputs is allocated to the social dimension. In addition, the clubs are more efficient in converting their sporting and social results into income, than when turning their economic resources into sporting successes and social support. As a result, the model makes it possible to extend efficiency analysis to professional sports organisations which have multiple objectives.
... 22 Acero, Serrano and Dimitropoulos and Sanchez, Barajas and Sanchez-Fernandez found that clubs with dispersed ownership obtained better financial performance. 23 Moreover, dispersed ownership was also related to a more efficient use of club resources for sport and economic aims 24 and a pricing policy more beneficial to fans. 25 Despite these advantages and the demands of fans for greater influence on their clubs, 26 the ownership of football clubs has become increasingly concentrated. Some authors, such as Conn 27 and Martin, 28 relate the participation of fans in club ownership to smaller clubs less affected by commercialization and other authors, as Porter,29 linked this participation to clubs in financial troubles. ...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this paper is to analyse the ownership of the Big Five (Big 5) leagues in Europe, the effects of fans' participation in the ownership of their clubs and how governance in European football can improve. The different structures used by fans to participate in the ownership of the clubs in the Big 5 leagues are analysed by showing the main features of ownership in the main leagues. The best practices of governance are identified, such as the protection of small shareholders, enhanced majorities for strategic decisions, two-tier boards with investors and fans, establishing fan representation by delegates or associations, and the limitation of voting rights or premium rights for seniority shareholders. Moreover, some flaws of the current structures should be avoided because these flaws hinder the raising of capital, increase the incentives to engage in risky management and reduce the incentives of fans to purchase shares.
... There is a debate about the objective of sport teams, between maximizing profit just like any other business (El-Hodiri and Quirk 1971;Fort and Quirk 1995) or maximizing utility through sporting results (Sloane 1971;Morrow 2003). Sánchez et al. (2017) observed that objectives could depend on the identity of the owners and found that the ownership of European football teams affected their performance taking into account sporting and financial goals. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The influence of market size, purchasing power or sport success in sport pricing policies has been studied. However, the influence of competitive balance and clubs’ ownership is still underinvestigated. The present paper covers this gap and study the effect of both of them in the in the price of the season tickets in the teams of the four main European football leagues from 2014 to 2017. The results show that the competitive unbalance of a league has a positive influence on the price of season tickets of the teams. A possible explication is that fan teams paid an extra-price for competing with more powerful teams that can provide ‘stars effect’. The results also show that a bigger concentration in the ownership implies more expensive season tickets. These results are in line with the theory that the participation of customers and stakeholders-oriented owners in firms avoids excessive prices in no competitive situations.
... On the other hand, Sánchez, Barajas and Sánchez-Fernández (2017) observe that concentrated ownership in European football helps avoiding problems associated with the cleavage between owners and managers, but might also increase the incentives for owners to take advantage of stakeholders, who would act as benefactors in the case of economic difficulties. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this study is to examine how the evolution of revenue sources and economic control measures has affected European football. Turnovers in European football have experienced strong growth, especially as far as television rights and commercial revenue are concerned. Such growth did not prevent clubs from undergoing financial difficulties, which led UEFA and national leagues to impose stricter financial controls. These events brought about an overall increased profitability for European clubs, as well as divergent developments in debt and expenditure on wages, which were furthermore concurrent with the fact that sporting successes concentrate in the strongest teams, both in continental and national competitions.
Article
Full-text available
Der interdisziplinäre Beitrag behandelt erstmalig Stand und Perspektiven der Arbeitsbeziehungen im Profifußball, wobei die Spielergewerkschaft besondere Berücksichtigung findet. Der erste Hauptteil analysiert ausführlich die Mitgliedschaftslogik (Verbandsstrukturen, Mitgliedschaft, Dienstleistungen für Mitglieder als Lösung des Kollektivgutproblems). Dieser umfangreiche Teil der Verbandspolitik ist auf die Besonderheiten des Arbeitsmarktes abgestimmt. Der zweite Hauptteil analysiert die Einflusslogik (Beziehungen zu korporativen Akteuren von sportspezifischer oder allgemeiner Bedeutung sowie Lobbying). Kollektivverhandlungen finden nicht statt, da die institutionellen Voraussetzungen fehlen, so dass die Einflusslogik weniger entwickelt ist als die Mitgliedschaftslogik. Das Fazit lautet, dass die Entwicklung dualer Arbeitsbeziehungen unwahrscheinlich ist, monistische entstehen allenfalls bei einigen Vereinen. In methodischer Hinsicht basiert der Beitrag auf einer umfassenden Dokumentenanalyse aller zugänglichen Verbandsmaterialien sowie Interviews mit Hauptamtlichen des Verbandes
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the literature on football and accounting has focused on some opaque spaces in the ownership of football clubs, as well as in the definition of collaboration and commercial partnership mechanisms that, even in the case of larger clubs, are at times misrepresented in financial reports (Chadwick et al., 2018; Sudgen et al., 2017; Holzen et al., 2019). Our paper describes the case of Italy and its main relevance lies in that spectrum of analysis; in effect, the strictly familial nature of Italian capitalism clearly emerges in the case of football, as well. The clubs are controlled by influential entrepreneurial families (often operating in the entertainment industry) who through football consolidate their image. Put in these terms, the risks of conflicts of interest and opacity in commercial formulas, already highlighted by the best and recent literature, are reflected in a system of economic and meta/non-economic returns in which the object “football” becomes an instrument of social recognition and financial growth via indirect mechanisms.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The paper takes the move from the recent (2018) essay by the global study jointly undertaken by the International Association of Lawyers (UIA) in partnership with the ICSS INSIGHT and the Sport Integrity Global Alliance (SIGA). Shockingly, the preliminary findings of that study reveal that only three countries have a dedicated body that has specific oversight of investment and ownership in its football clubs and only two nations are able to fully track and monitor the money behind club investments and ownership. Meanwhile, the vast majority of countries do not have any mechanism in which to understand the source of a club’s investment and rely on generic laws with most ‘assuming’ that any financial scrutiny falls under the country’s existing club licensing system. On the premises of the above, the paper traces the case of Italy Serie A and it develops some considerations regarding the negative consequences of the lack of transparency (e.g., purchasing clubs for non-sporting reasons, such as transforming them into vehicles for money laundering, third-party investment funds and sports betting fraud).
Article
Full-text available
RESUMEN: El presente trabajo estudia la influencia de las estructuras de propiedad de los principales equipos de fútbol europeos en su rentabilidad. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que la propiedad dispersa y nacional de un equipo tiene una relación positiva con su rentabilidad financiera. Por otra parte, el hecho de que los equipos se organicen como clubes o como sociedades mercantiles no parece influir en su desempeño económico. ABSTRACT: The present paper attempts to study the influence of the ownership structures of the major European football teams in their own profitability. The results show that the dispersed and national ownership of a club has a positive relationship with their financial profitability. However, the fact that the teams are organized as corporations or clubs does not influence their economic performance.
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this study is to measure the efficiency of the major European football teams under financial and win objectives using profits and UEFA coefficient as outputs. An alternative model is presented maximizing wins and minimizing financial losses. Results show much room for improvement, especially in financial management. El estudio de la eficiencia de una empresa o sector permite evaluar su gestión y el grado de alcance de los objetivos planteados sujetos a la restricción de unos recursos limitados. En el caso de los equipos deportivos se identifican dos posibles objetivos diferentes por parte de sus propietarios: el beneficio monetario como cualquier otro negocio y la satisfacción de conseguir éxitos deportivos. En la literatura, esta dualidad en los objetivos ha abierto un debate en el que unos autores han desarrollados modelos asumiendo que el objetivo de los equipos es la maximización del beneficio como el de cualquier otro negocio. Este es el caso de los trabajos de Fort y Quirk (1995), Feess y Stähler (2009), Szymanski y Kénese (2004). Mientras otros trabajos como los de Gerrard y Dobson (2000), Késenne (2006) y Zimbalist (2003) tomaron como premisa que la maximización de los resultados deportivos es el principal objetivo de los equipos. Finalmente, otros autores como Dietl, Grossmann y Lang (2011) o Szymanski (1998) han establecido modelos donde se ponderaban ambos objetivos. Esta disyuntiva también se ha trasladado a los estudios sobre eficiencia de los equipos de fútbol en la que algunos trabajos se han centrado en solo uno de esos aspectos, el financiero o el deportivo, mientras otros han tratado de combinar ambos. Barros y Garcia-del-Barrio (2008) y Kulikova y Goshunova (2013) detallan este tema. El presente trabajo realiza tres aportaciones principales a la literatura. La primera de ellas se refiere a la elección de las variables a estudiar. La medición más habitual para medir el desempeño deportivo en los trabajo de eficiencia han sido los puntos obtenidos en las competiciones ligueras de los equipos estudiados y por la parte financiera los ingresos totales. La literatura ha utilizado inputs relacionados con los costes, en algunos casos considerando solo los relacionados con la plantilla y en otros incluyendo todos. Aquí se presenta una selección diferente de variables, tomando como output el beneficio siguiendo la idea de Nerlove (1965) ya que es el objetivo perseguido por los accionistas. Coelli et al. (2005) indicaron que la maximización de beneficios es un concepto más amplio que aporta información adicional frente a las eficiencias basadas en la minimización de costes o la maximización de ingresos. Además si se escogen los resultados deportivos como output por ser uno de los objetivos de los propietarios, aquellos con intereses financieros estarán interesados en maximizar el beneficio y no los ingresos como indica Sánchez (2006). Asimismo autores como Altman (1968) y Sinkey (1983) mostraron que la mejor fuente de información es la comparativa de los beneficios con los fondos propios o el activo como ocurre en los ratios de rentabilidad ROE (Return On Equity (Rentabilidad Financiera))o ROA (Return On Asset (Rentabilidad Económica)). Por esa razón se ha elegido el beneficio como output, mientras que como input se utiliza el activo total. No se pueden utilizar los fondos propios dado que en la muestra estudiada existen varios equipos con saldo negativo que desvirtuarían los resultados. Si en otros sectores un inversor aporta unos recursos para obtener un rendimiento financiero, en el fútbol además hay inversores maximizadores de resultados deportivos que además pueden estar dispuestos a soportar un quebranto económico. Esos quebrantos se traducen en pérdidas que suponen una disminución del valor de su inversión y, si son continuos, pueden implicar la necesidad de ampliar capital. Pero si la satisfacción del resultado deportivo es mayor que la valoración subjetiva de ese quebranto monetario, la utilidad total puede ser positiva como expone Sánchez (2012). Esto no obvia que los propietarios prefieran que esos quebrantos sean mínimos, por lo que se incorpora como input las pérdidas contables de los equipos. Una segunda aportación es el estudio de un segundo modelo de eficiencia en línea con la idea planteada por Sloane (1971) de que para algunos propietarios no resultan perfectamente sustituibles la rentabilidad financiera y la deportiva. Así autores como Késenne (1996) o Gerrard y Dobson (2000) consideran que la gestión se dirigirá a maximizar los resultados deportivos minimizando los activos utilizados y las posibles pérdidas. Esta visión nos lleva a establecer un nuevo modelo no recogido por estudios de eficiencia anteriores donde se maximiza el resultado deportivo
Article
The paper examines the impact of ownership structure on company economic performance in 435 of the largest European companies. Controlling for industry, capital structure and nation effects we find a positive effect of ownership concentration on shareholder value (market‐to‐book value of equity) and profitability (asset returns), but the effect levels off for high ownership shares. Furthermore we propose and support the hypothesis that the identity of large owners—family, bank, institutional investor, government, and other companies—has important implications for corporate strategy and performance. For example, compared to other owner identities, financial investor ownership is found to be associated with higher shareholder value and profitability, but lower sales growth. The effect of ownership concentration is also found to depend on owner identity. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
This paper integrates elements from the theory of agency, the theory of property rights and the theory of finance to develop a theory of the ownership structure of the firm. We define the concept of agency costs, show its relationship to the 'separation and control' issue, investigate the nature of the agency costs generated by the existence of debt and outside equity, demonstrate who bears the costs and why, and investigate the Pareto optimality of their existence. We also provide a new definition of the firm, and show how our analysis of the factors influencing the creation and issuance of debt and equity claims is a special case of the supply side of the completeness of markets problem.
Article
The aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of corporate governance quality (namely board size, board independence, managerial ownership, institutional ownership, and CEO duality) on the profitability and viability of European Union's football clubs over the period 2005-2009. Empirical results documented that corporate governance quality (higher managerial and institutional ownership, increased board size and independence, and the separation of the CEO and chairman roles) leads to greater levels of profitability and viability. Further analysis based on clubs' profitability and viability indicates that sound governance mechanisms are also important for those clubs with intense problems of insolvency and low financial performance. The results of this study dictate the necessity of corporate governance principles for protecting the interests of shareholders and various stakeholders and for maximizing the clubs' economic results and social return. The empirical findings are robust to several sensitivity tests concerning the specification of the models and the measures of financial performance.
Article
This paper investigates whether management stock ownership and large non-management blockholder share ownership are related to firm value across a sample of 1433 firms from 18 emerging markets. When a management group's control rights exceed its cash flow rights, 1 find that firm values are lower. I also find that large non-management control rights blockholdings are positively related to firm value. Both of these effects are significantly more pronounced in countries with low shareholder protection. One interpretation of these results is that external shareholder protection mechanisms play a role in restraining managerial agency costs and that large non-management blockholders can act as a partial substitute for missing institutional governance mechanisms.
Article
In the US, most economists argue that professional sports teams are profit‐maximising businesses, but it is a widely held view in Europe that professional football clubs are not run on a profit‐maximising basis. This belief has important implications for the impact of widely‐advocated policy measures, such as revenue sharing. This paper looks at the performance of 16 English football clubs that acquired a stock exchange listing in the mid‐1990s. If the European story is true, we should have observed a shift toward profit‐maximising behaviour at these clubs, under the assumption that investors were attracted to these football clubs to earn a positive return. This paper finds no evidence of any shift in the behaviour of these 16 clubs after flotation. This result is consistent with the view that football clubs in England have been much more oriented toward profit objectives than is normally assumed.
Book
Soccer leagues worldwide are being dominated by clubs who are becoming richer and more powerful. Enormous corporate investment, deals with media giants, merchandising and dedicated TV channels mean that soccer teams are as concerned with the affairs of the boardroom as what is going on on the field. In this dynamic book, Stephen Morrow examines the changing face of soccer, looking at issues such as the role of the stock exchange, the stakeholder approach, the "new economics" of soccer including the role of media firms.