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Abstract

With the increase in mobile device affordances, there has been a concomitant rise in the level of interest in investigating the breadth, purpose and extent of mobile learning in education. This systematic review provides a current synthesis of mobile learning research across 2010–2015 in PK-12 education. This includes a aggregated quantitative and qualitative analysis of the specific mobile learning activities as they connect to learning theories, specifically behaviorist, constructivist, situated, and collaborative learning. Major findings include that the majority of the studies focused on student learning followed by designing systems. Science was the most common subject researched and elementary schools was the most often studies setting. The findings reveal that 40% of the time researchers designed mobile learning activities aligning with the behaviorist approach to learning. This has the students consuming knowledge and not using the full potential of the mobile devices to have students become producers, collaborators, and creators of knowledge.

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... ICT for education is essential for allowing children to become contributors to the creation of technology, instead of only consumers (Crompton, Burke, and Gregory 2017;Unnikrishnan et al. 2016). Free access to information through InfoInternet would inspire and encourage various initiatives to reach the Global South schools, such as: Code Club 22 (Smith, Sutcliffe, and Sandvik 2014) ICT for Development (ICT4D) is a large field (Avgerou 2008;Heeks 2002Heeks , 2008Unwin 2009), and the work in this paper fits particularly in the education part (Selwyn 2013b(Selwyn , 2016, which ICT influences both positively (Pegrum 2014) and negatively (Selwyn 2013a). ...
... We consider, based on existing studies (Ciampa 2014;Crompton, Burke, and Gregory 2017), that once children and educators get access to relevant information through the Internet, their motivation and skills will increase. Already only with the technological infrastructure in place one can see positive results in cognitive and digital skills development. ...
... This is where the InfoInternet solution is needed. Once the adoption and motivation is assured, as we can see from comprehensive studies (Crompton, Burke, and Gregory 2017;Haßler, Major, and Hennessy 2016), mobile technologies can viably support children with their learning tasks and bring positive outcomes on learning achievements. ...
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This paper summarizes our work on studying educational applications enabled by the introduction of a new information layer called InfoInternet. This is an initiative to facilitate affordable access to internet-based information in communities with network scarcity or economic problems from the Global South. InfoInternet develops both networking solutions as well as business and social models, together with actors like mobile operators and government organizations. In this paper we identify and describe characteristics of educational applications, their specific users, and learning environment. We are interested in applications that make the adoption of Internet faster, cheaper, and wider in such communities. When developing new applications (or adopting existing ones) for such constrained environments, this work acts as initial guidelines prior to field studies.
... As mobile platforms and networks have become more powerful, more dynamic and more available to all, the mobility of ICT has changed the scenario of the two separate spheres of learning: in schools or everywhere. Nowadays, learners can have ICT constantly through platforms such as mobile phones, tablets and laptop computers, and thus there has been a rise in the level of interest in investigating the subject (Crompton et al., 2017). According to Francesc Pedró, leader of teacher development work and education policies at UNESCO: ...
... There has been growing interest in empirical research (Figure 3), incorporating design processes in order to evaluate how mobile devices are able to facilitate education and performance (Grant, 2019). Crompton et al. (2017) conducted a systematic review of literature on the use of mobile learning in primary and secondary education between 2010-2015. Regarding the learning outcomes, a total of 62% of the studies reported that the use of mobile devices in a learning activity resulted in increased student learning, 34% reported other outcomes as they did not measure student learning, 12% reported neutral outcomes and 1% was negative. ...
... Regarding the subject domain, science was the subject matter most often researched with 56%, the next was literacy (21%), mathematics was the third (10%), followed by history (6%), special education (5%) and art (2%). Moreover, Crompton et al. (2017) mention that other studies also show that science is the most represented content, explaining that the common use of this area could be due to its very nature, based on inquiring into the natural world, and mobile devices provide the tools to make this enquiry more accessible and ubiquitous. The authors argue that most studies are connected with the behaviourist approach to learning (40%), meaning that students are consuming knowledge and that the full potential of the devices is not used in the design of learning activities. ...
... Additionally, these review studies offered a summary of the various issues associated with using a mobile phone to teach and learn language skills in various contexts. Between 2000 and 2020, researchers discovered that several studies had examined the use of various mobile phone applications for improving learners' different language skills, i.e., listening, writing, speaking, and reading [15][16][17][18][19]. Additionally, some review studies identified 21 [15] and 16 [19] EFL contexts of the studies on mobile phones in 2001 and 2015. ...
... Between 2000 and 2020, researchers discovered that several studies had examined the use of various mobile phone applications for improving learners' different language skills, i.e., listening, writing, speaking, and reading [15][16][17][18][19]. Additionally, some review studies identified 21 [15] and 16 [19] EFL contexts of the studies on mobile phones in 2001 and 2015. ...
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The use of mobile devices for English language teaching (ELT) is increasing rapidly all over the world. This review study surveys the empirical research on using mobile phones in ELT published in Scopus and Web of Science indexing journals from 2010 to 2020 in Bangladesh. Out of 103 studies, 11 studies met the criteria of this study to analyze the effects of mobile phones on ELT. The findings show that the major research trends of these studies aim at teachers’ professional development using mobile phones for teaching language. The findings also reveal that the use of mobile phones is effective in ELT through facilitating feasible, ubiquitous, and effective learning environments with some limitations, i.e., an issue with charging, a small screen, affection, and a lack of teacher confidence. Of the studies conducted, 83% have employed a qualitative research design for investigating learners’ readiness and concepts on the use of this device. In addition, there is a lack of empirical studies with the intention to observe and justify the effect of mobile phones on developing learners’ language skills. There is also a lack of evidence describing which mobile applications are effective for developing relevant language skills. Overall, the results of this systematic review might be applicable in the context of similarly developing countries, as well as triggering empirical research in the field of technology-enhanced ELT in these countries.
... Isso faz com que os estudantes consumam conhecimento, mas não usem todo o potencial dos dispositivos móveis para se tornarem produtores, colaboradores e criadores de conhecimento e para desenvolverem o pensamento de ordem superior, como o crítico e o criativo. (CROMPTON;BURKE;GREGORY, 2017). ...
... Isso faz com que os estudantes consumam conhecimento, mas não usem todo o potencial dos dispositivos móveis para se tornarem produtores, colaboradores e criadores de conhecimento e para desenvolverem o pensamento de ordem superior, como o crítico e o criativo. (CROMPTON;BURKE;GREGORY, 2017). ...
... Systematic review is the art and science of identifying, selecting and synthesizing primary research studies to provide a comprehensive and reliable framework for the subject under study. In systematic review research, findings are synthesized and interpreted in a balanced and neutral way (Crompton, Burke, & Gregory, 2017). Findings are questioned according to clear contexts and research objectives, and the research is grounded on studies with a clear and rigorous design. ...
... Sistematik derleme incelenen konunun kapsamlı ve güvenilir çerçevesini ortaya koymak için birincil araştırma çalışmalarını belirleme, seçme ve sentezleme sanatı ve bilimidir. Sistematik araştırmada bulgular dengeli ve tarafsız bir şekilde sentezlenir ve yorumlanır (Crompton, Burke & Gregory, 2017). Bulgular net bağlamlara ve araştırma amaçlarına göre sorgulanır, açık ve titiz bir tasarıma sahip çalışmalar temel alınır. ...
... Accordingly, social science studies were conducted to assess the impact of the use of mobile and ubiquitous systems on teachers and learners [9]. While exploring the impact on learners at different learning age, from primary schools to universities [11,18,25,44,58], it was mainly reported that used technologies are able to "support smooth interaction between authentic and digital learning resources and provide personalized learning opportunities" [54]. The technology "has improved the ways of accessing knowledge, researching, communicating, socialising and succeeding in all levels of education" [7]. ...
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In ubiquitous environments, the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of context sensors besides their characteristics have a great importance on undermining the quality of the detected context and the whole situation described by that context. A recent interest had been made to manage the quality of low-level context in the ubiquitous learning (u-learning) field; however, the quality of the u-learning situation has never been a main concern. Hence, a quality-aware description and a quality-aware ontological model of the u-learning situation are proposed. Experimentation results are given to show the implication of the quality of situation in the enhancement of situation identification. Quality-based situation identification provided 52% of high-quality identified situations compared to only 38% for the standard identification showing an enhancement of 14% in high-quality situation identification.
... Since its arrival, M-learning has been used in different levels of education, but mostly in mathematics, language, engineering and computer science (Crompton, Burke, & Gregory, 2017;Hwang & Tsai, 2011;Sabah, 2016). This learning approach affords students the opportunities to connect informal virtual learning experiences with formal ones, increasing their overall learning experiences (Motiwalla, 2007). ...
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The use of mobile learning, or M-learning, has been increasingly appreciated by educators due to its sustainability potential in different facets such as finance (i.e., affordable cost) and flexibility (i.e., time and pace of learning). However, it may not be effective in all situations. This study explored the feasibility of using M-learning for students' self-study of mathematics in the context of Vietnamese high schools. Using 542 student and 40 teacher responses to two surveys, the study showed that the use of M-learning might not be feasible for students' self-study of mathematics due to difficulties related to accessing mathematics websites, the quality of mathematics website content, stu-dents' low level of self-learning ability and learning disengagement. This study suggests that the use of M-learning may contribute to the sustainability of education; adopting it should be based on a critical examination of contextual factors, especially stu-dents' self-learning ability and engagement. M-learning can be promising and beneficial to students due to its capability to equip students to prepare for the fast-changing and technological-driven world. Educators have increasingly appreciated the use of M-learning, because it becomes more affordable and flexible. Nonetheless, there is still a question about near-future adoptions of M-learning due to unavailability of and in-accessibility to quality contents from trusted maths websites. The propensity of student engagements in M-learning is also an important issue for future research.
... Students can benefit from mobile learning in a variety of topics, including science, math, history, and art. There has been a growth in the level of interest in examining the breadth, purpose, and scope of mobile learning in education as a result of the increasing availability of gadgets [1]. Learning in higher education has evolved as a result of the growth of mobile learning (M-Learning). ...
Article
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Mobile learning theory and the demand analysis of mobile learning systems for ideological and political education at universities are presented in this study. The study analyses the use of mobile learning based on industrial communication devices (ICDs) in ideological and political education by doing research on mobile development technology and mobile learning systems. ICD-based mobile learning platforms can be used for ideological and political education by conducting a questionnaire. The main advantage of using this ICD-based mobile learning platform is the teaching and learning process will be continued under any circumstances. Even if the teacher and the students are in distant location, secured access privileges can be provided for effective communication for the processes. For ideological and political education, a remote supervision algorithm was developed to evaluate the performance of industrial communication devices. The proposed algorithm generated 90% more accuracy than the current technique.
... Mobile learning is characterized with three central features "authenticity, collaboration and personalization, embedded in the unique time-space context" (Kearney, M., Schuck, S., Burden, K., & Aubusson, P. (2012), which have been established to critically review reported mobile learning scenarios, activities, and pedagogical approaches. A systematic review has shown that students are mainly knowledge consumers and are not using the full potential of the mobile devices to have them become producers, collaborators, and creators of knowledge (Crompton, H., Burke, D., & Gregory, K. H., 2017). This shows that, despite the potentials of mobile devices for learning in and outside of the classroom more can be done in exploiting all of its prospective for interpreting and employing mathematics across contexts in particular. ...
Conference Paper
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Compared to the vast amount of research body bringing mobile handheld devices in tide connection to informal or ubiquitous learning (u-learning), this paper firstly exploits their potentials and challenges for mobile learning (m-learning) of mathematics theoretically. Drawing on recent research, its further part attempts to make the potentials explicit by bringing math trails for the learning of mathematics in context outside the classroom into focus. It then elaborates on the characteristics of task designs in mobile applications for math trails, their authenticity, and opportunities for teachers’ active engagement in the design and students’ involvement in rich mathematical activities. It finalizes with suggesting design principles for quality task sequences in mobile apps for math trails based on an undertaken literature review that contributes to growth of knowledge about mobile learning and creation of stable, scalable, and sustainable scientific results.
... As mobile technologies have become ubiquitous in society and more prevalent in education, several reviews of m-learning studies have been published. Systematic reviews of research conducted on m-learning in P/K-12 education over the last decade have consistently revealed that science has been the subject most often studied (e.g., Crompton, Burke, & Gregory, 2017;Crompton, Burke, Gregory, & Gräbe, 2016;Lui, Kuhn, Acosta, Niño-Soto, Quintana, & Slotta, 2014;Wu, Wu, Chen, Kao, Lin, & Huang, 2012). ...
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Background Mobile learning studies often focus on teachers' perspectives. This study instead considers students' experiences of learning with mobile devices (i.e., m‐learning) in secondary school mathematics and science. Objectives The research aims to describe the m‐learning experiences of secondary mathematics and science students, and to determine the extent to which distinctive pedagogical dimensions impact students' perceived learning. Methods A survey instrument using the iPAC mobile pedagogical framework as a theoretical lens is developed and validated. This framework highlights three pedagogical dimensions: personalization, authenticity, and collaboration. Structural equation modelling is used to investigate how each dimension predicts students' perceived improvement in learning, whilst accounting for usage context, among a sample of students in schools where mobile devices are used extensively. Results and Conclusions Students were in agreement that personalization was a characteristic of their m‐learning experiences, but authentic and collaborative learning were not as strongly featured. M‐learning activities fostering personalization were most important for improving perceived learning; authenticity and collaboration were also significant, but no differences in perceived learning improvement due to location were found. Authentic m‐learning and perceived improvement in learning with mobile devices were significantly higher in science than mathematics subjects. Implications When teachers design m‐learning tasks that enhance personalization, collaboration, and authenticity, students are predicted to perceive improvements in their learning. The findings suggest that teachers should consider designing technology‐enhanced tasks that improve students' experiences of collaborative and authentic learning, particularly in mathematics for greatest gains in students' perceived improvement in learning.
... Quizzes are used in education for many reasons. For instance, they provide retrieval practice (Roediger et al., 2011;Rowland, 2014;Adesope et al., 2017;Sanchez et al., 2020), present performance feedback (Keough, 2012;Chien et al., 2016;Hunsu et al., 2016), assist in drill-andpractice exercises (Crompton et al., 2017;Hung et al., 2018), or-when used collectively in a classroom-improve interaction and attention levels (Hunsu et al., 2016). Quizzes are typically used as supplements to other types of instruction: after an initial period of studying, learners complete a quiz. ...
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Instructional quizzes are frequently used in educational games. When they present correct answers after learners have responded, these quizzes can be used on their own for teaching new factual and conceptual knowledge (no additional learning materials are needed). In games, these quizzes are often unrelated to gameplay: gameplay can be viewed as a reward for answering quiz questions. This has been criticized in game-based learning literature as a “chocolate-covered-broccoli” approach. However, is it really a bad approach? Theories offer conflicting predictions concerning the instructional efficiency of in-game quizzes relative to bare quizzes (i.e., not embedded in games) and empirical literature is lacking. Here, we present a within-subject design study (N = 69), in which 10–12-year-olds learn from both an in-game quiz and a bare quiz and undergo immediate and 2–3 weeks delayed post-test on the quiz questions. A modest difference in learning outcomes favoring the bare quiz was found in the immediate post-tests (d = 0.46), but not in the 2–3 weeks delayed post-tests (d = 0.09). Children enjoyed the game more than the bare quiz (dz = 0.65) and 59 preferred the game in the free-choice period. The findings suggest that both a bare quiz and a quiz within a game have their place at the table for useful educational interventions: the bare quiz should be preferred in schooling contexts; whereas, the game in leisure time situations as a voluntary activity. In the latter case, it should be considered how the game and the quiz are integrated.
... Mégis épp ez a felgyorsult fejlődés inthet óvatosságra, hiszen ezek a költséges technikai eszközök elképesztő sebességgel avulnak el, és könynyen amortizálódnak, megfelelő pedagógiai és módszertani tudás nélkül így az eszközökben rejlő lehetőségek gyakran kihasználatlanok maradnak. Az óvodai munkakörnyezethez elsősorban olyan kompakt és nehezen elnyűhető eszközök választása a célszerű, amelyek minél többféle tartalom közvetítésére és ezáltal minél változatosabb tevékenységek támogatására használhatók, illeszkedve az óvodás gyermekek életkori sajátosságaihoz (Crompton, Burke & Gregory, 2017). ...
Article
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A digitális eszközök óvodai alkalmazása számos új lehetőséget és kihívást nyújt az óvodapedagógusoknak. Célunk támpontot nyújtani a digitális technológiát eredményesen felhasználni kívánó óvodapedagógusok és szakemberek számára. Tanulmányunkban nemzetközi és hazai kutatások eredményeire alapozva felvázoljuk a technológia óvodai alkalmazásának jelenlegi tendenciáit, az elérhető eszközök jellemzőit és felhasználási lehetőségeit. Ismertetjük az IKT-alapú pedagógiai tervezés óvodai vonatkozásait és a technológiai integráció szintjeit leíró SAMR és PICRAT keretrendszereket. Bemutatjuk a technológiával támogatott óvodai fejlesztések nemzetközi tapasztalatait, külön kitérve az iskolakezdéshez fontos alapkészségek terén szerzett kutatási eredményekre, valamint részletesen foglalkozunk az óvodai technológia alapú mérések sajátosságaival és az iskolaelőkészítést segítő diagnosztikus értékelési programokkal. A digitális eszközök és alkalmazások terén jelentős fejlesztések zajlanak, így egyre inkább képesek felvenni a versenyt a hagyományos eszközökkel. Hatékonyságuk kulcsa azonban továbbra is a pedagógus, akinek a saját pedagógiai céljaihoz igazítva kell kiválasztania a digitális eszközöket, valamint megtervezni azok integrációját és alkalmazását.
... Mobile learning is an intersection of mobile computing and e-learning that provides: resources that can be accessed from anywhere, powerful search system capabilities, rich interactions, full support for effective learning, and performance-based assessments 11 . An alternative learning model that has characteristics independent of location and time. ...
Conference Paper
In this millennial era, technology is growing rapidly, it is hoped that everything can be digitized in order to facilitate the access process. Likewise in the education sector, digital media is expected to facilitate the work of teachers and students’ understanding of material at school. Therefore we want to create an educational platform that contains a lesson in school, and we choose chemistry. After conducting the survey, the subject of chemistry lesson chosen by the respondents was stoichiometry. The name of this app is “SIAB”. SIAB “Stoichiometry Acid Base” is a chemical calculator application that is useful for calculating the quantitatively between reagents (reactants) and products (reaction products) in acid base reaction. There are 3 steps methodology to implement it, first step is problem survey, to find out whether the chosen problem is related to the target. Second step is analysis, to make sure that the problem relates to the target, and the target is experiencing the chosen problem. Last step is application design to build and design SIAB apps, for the application design step there are 3 part of step. The first step, we search and gather sources that contain about acid and base chemical reaction theory, which will be used as a reference material to be displayed in the application. Then the second step is the fulfillment of the required application assets including image and audio which for help user to make more interesting and understanding easily. The third step is determining the core software used to make the application. The result of the implementation test of our application is 90% of students find this application helpful to determine the results of chemical reactions between several molecules and easier to study. This mobile application can be used to simplify the calculation of acid-base stoichiometry anytime and anywhere.
... If there is a daily relationship with mobile devices, adapting education on them directly or indirectly would give rise to a generation with higher educational achievements. In relation to the above, it has been demonstrated that learning in science and mathematics subjects or courses at primary and secondary level is improved by means of mobile devices (Crompton et al., 2017). In Mexico, the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Informatics (INEGI, 2018) reported that, in 2018, 73.5% of the population aged six or more uses cell phones in some way; that is, at least seven out of every ten people have a smartphone. ...
Article
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Pattern recognition is an important skill of Computational Thinking and is one of the most important competences for solving a problem that involves finding similarities or patterns in small problems to solve more complex ones. In this work, we present the mobile application software Patrony. The main contribution of this work is to promote the learning of Computational Thinking, especially pattern recognition, in specific sectors of education in Mexico through the simple use of a software application. To evaluate the effectiveness of the mobile application, tests were carried out in two elementary schools with a total of 43 students, which were divided into 2 groups: a control group and an experimental group. The results of the tests showed that the learning gain (M = 6.50 in postest compared to M = 4.94 on pretest) of the students who used our mobile application produces a significant difference with respect to students who learned using a traditional method of classroom teaching. The results also infer that computational thinking applications can be used as effective learning tools within some important Mathematics topics in public and private schools in Mexico.
... With respect to the field of science education, a systematic review by Crompton et al. (2017) shows that in K-12 education, science was the most common subject adopting mobile technology in classroom settings and the elementary stage was the most often studied situations. Researchers have noted that mobile technology can provide five common technological affordances for students to conduct collaborative inquiry activities (Suárez et al., 2018): (1) support and guidance in ill-structured inquiry activities, including location guidance, procedure guidance, and metacognition support embedded in mobile devices; (2) access to content, such as access to fixed content in software and the dynamic content retrieval in a browser; (3) cooperative data collection (e.g., capturing multimedia data and taking notes) and collaborative data collection (e.g., collaborative concept maps and graphical data visualization of data jointly collected); (4) synchronous peer communication (e.g., instant messaging and chats with notifications) and asynchronous peer communication (e.g., forums and online discussion boards); and (5) contextual support, including augmented experiences, immersive simulation, and adaptive feedback. ...
Article
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Recent research in collaborative learning has indicated that peer assessment has a positive influence on students’ learning performance and learning process. This study investigates how the different subgroups of two roles (assessors and assessees) in peer assessment contribute to students’ perceptions of science learning in mobile technology-supported collaborative learning (MSCL), including learning motivation, self-efficacy, group efficacy, and anxiety level. In total, 128 fifth-grade students participated in this study. They were asked to complete science inquiry tasks in groups with the support of mobile devices throughout a semester and to conduct a peer assessment activity at the end of the semester. According to scores from others and scores to others in peer assessment activities, we divided the students into subgroups (high, medium, low). The results indicate that the self-efficacy and group efficacy of students in the high score group were significantly higher than that of the medium score group when they act as assessors. Moreover, as assessees, the learning motivation of the high score students was significantly higher than that of the low score students, and the anxiety level of the low score students was significantly higher than that of the medium score students. These findings have important implications for the design of peer assessment activities and may help teachers identify the potential usages of peer assessment to enhance students’ positive perceptions in MSCL.
... The rapid development of mobile technology and secondary school students' increased ownership of mobile devices with internet access have the potential to expand communication methods, collaborative learning Heflin et al. 2017), access to traditional learning and access to information resources (Donaldson 2011). Recent reviews regarding mobile learning research reported on the promotion of students' learning performances and motivation (Chang and Hwang 2019;Crompton et al. 2017), as well as on students' learning/perceptions of specific subjects such as language Kukulska-Hulme and Viberg 2018), science (Bano et al. 2018;Bellou et al. 2018) and mathematics (Bano et al. 2018). The use of mobile devices among secondary school students is increasingly more common (Christensen and Knezek 2018), while mobile learning and mobile technology acceptance research in secondary education is still limited . ...
Chapter
The use of mobile devices/phones among secondary school students is increasingly more common. However, mobile learning research in secondary education is still limited and this topic is not covered in the literature in the Greek context. This chapter presents the situation in Greek secondary education with regard to mobile devices and mobile learning, discussing the existing policy and recent empirical findings. The integration of mobile devices in Greek secondary schools is negatively affected by the current legislative framework. However, despite the ban, a few teachers take initiatives and allow their students to use mobile devices/phones in classrooms for educational purposes. Empirical findings revealed that teachers reported positive perceptions towards mobile learning, being aware of the pros and cons of mobile devices’ usage in classrooms. Students reported positive perceptions and high self-efficacy in using mobile devices, they could name educational activities they would like to do with their mobile phones in the classroom, but fewer students could name specific problems (and rules that should apply) associated with the use of mobile phones. Implications for students, teachers and educational policy makers are discussed.
... Digital technologies are used as an educational tool in areas such e-learning, online learning, flipped learning (Yildiz Durak, , 2018, mobile learning (Crompton et al., 2017), e-portfolios (Beckers et al., 2016), MOOCs, educational social networks (Yildiz Durak, 2019a), short message services (e.g., WhatsApp) (Saritepeci et al., 2019), digital games (Kordaki & Gousiou, 2017) or augmented or virtual reality (Durak et al., 2020). ...
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Pre-service training is the most important stage when teachers learn about integrating technology into their teaching. Pre-service teachers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of technologies can be used to predict their intention of including technology in their classrooms in the future. Having the necessary technical equipment available is considered important by these teachers to deal with current educational problems, and find solutions. Therefore, pre-service teachers’ educational activities were studied in this study and the use of new technologies in education was discussed. The contribution of different methods regarding the use of digital technologies for instructional purposes by pre-service teachers in different departments was investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the different methods have an effect on the teachers’ technology integration self-efficacy (TISE), motivation, satisfaction and attitude towards the use of technology. The opinions of the pre-service teachers about the technologies used in the lessons were also analyzed. This study employed a mixed-method methodology. The sample in this study comprised 96 pre-service teachers at a university in Turkey who were divided into groups. The study involved a personal information form, semi-structured interview form, and four different scales. An ANCOVA analysis and descriptive statistics were used with the quantitative data, and content analysis was used in the analysis of the qualitative data. The results of this research show that a significant difference exists between the technology integration exercises performed using different methods, the students’ level of contribution to TISE and their motivation and technology use attitudes (TUA). The motivation and satisfaction levels were higher in the groups where authentic task-based instruction was used. It has been observed that closed-ended practical tasks support students’ self-efficacy to integrate technology. On the other hand, open-ended task-based activities were found to support an increase in attitudes towards technology use more than in the other groups. The group where closed-ended applications for technology integration self-efficacy, motivation, satisfaction and use of technology were performed differed in terms of gender, department and grade.
... Kearney et al. (2019) suggested feasible disruptions in mobile teaching practice. With technology adoption, mobile learning and pedagogy research focuses on mobile learning and blended models (Crompton et al., 2017). Bano et al. (2018) pointed out that "the pedagogical affordances may not have been fully explored or tested properly if no one else was involved in the evaluation" (p. ...
Article
Digital education with mobile technology is becoming a global trend. This study considers language teachers’ challenges related to open distance teaching in higher education. Twenty-eight university lecturers participated in the semi-structured interviews and expressed their opinions on how mobile technologies impacted the nature of teaching and learning in tertiary education. In particular, four themes associated with teaching English in the context of mobile technologies were discussed: (1) technology mediation, (2) disruptive pedagogy, (3) English teaching, and (4) learning flexibility. The results show that mobile technology and pedagogical innovation are not challenging for teachers. Instead, psychological anxiety, extended pedagogical roles, and learning flexibility are the challenging issues. Based on the results, a theoretical framework for digital education and a learning model for digital native students are proposed. This study suggests further work to promote pedagogy that connects students with higher-level thinking.
... A mobile device would be any portable user electronic device with multimedia, information storage, and internet capabilities. Although this definition covers laptop computers, in the recent literature, the most common examples of mobile devices are smartphones and tablet computers (Crompton et al. 2017;Fu and Hwang 2018). Steeves (2014) reported that youth often used mobile technologies for daily activities, such as personal communication and information search. ...
Article
The purpose of this study was to develop a mobile learning acceptance model for pre-service teachers and to examine the relationships among technology acceptance factors. The literature on mobile learning acceptance lacks studies on pre-service teachers and studies that include concrete mobile learning scenarios. To overcome these problems, we have developed and implemented a mobile-technology-enabled information technology course. The data collection and analysis were conducted in two separate studies. First, we developed a mobile learning acceptance scale and applied confirmatory factor analysis with 408 participants. The final instrument included 28 items measuring eight technology acceptance factors, namely behavioral intention, attitude towards use, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, social influence, facilitating conditions, self-efficacy, and anxiety. After this, we collected a new set of data from 316 participants to examine the relationships among the factors using structural equation modeling. In both studies, we investigated the respective models’ invariance across gender and discipline groups, and both models fulfilled invariance requirements. The results indicated that perceived ease of use and social influence have direct effects on behavioral intention, whereas self-efficacy has an indirect effect. Depending on the group, the explained variance of behavioral intention ranged between 18.1% and 60.6%.
... M-learning allows us to combine several methodologies and learning strategies in line with the profiles and learning needs of students. To this end, m-learning seeks to integrate learning theories, especially constructivist and behavioral ones, with the aim of creating collaborative work environments [16]. Therefore, talking about the mere use of devices in the classroom as a synonym of m-learning is no longer possible. ...
... Unguided learners might feel lost in the array of opportunities and may choose to stick to what is familiar. Moreover, in some contexts, the assessment and validation instruments for evaluating and standardizing components of the software are open for discussion [20,21]. ese are basic concerns that can require teachers to select certain CALLenhanced programs in their classes, and it is paramount for solid implementation of CALL or MALL that the chosen programs fit the actual needs of the learners in a particular context of teaching. ...
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CALL- and MALL-enhanced learning applications have dominated the field of second language (L2) learning recently. This study aims to investigate the effect of applying a CALL-enhanced L2 vocabulary learning software program on the L2 vocabulary development of English as Foreign Language (EFL) students. 76 preintermediate EFL students registered at a foreign language school were chosen from a total of 156 students after running an Oxford Quick Placement Test (OQPT). The participants were randomly assigned to two groups: the experimental group (EG = 38) and the control group (CG = 38). A vocabulary test as pretest was administered to all the participants before the treatment. During the treatment, the EG learners were requested to utilize a computer-enhanced flashcard software program on their laptops, mobile phones, or other mobile devices at their discretion. By using the program, they could access and utilize a variety of flashcards on many subject matters such as languages, geography, math, and science as well as construct their own flashcards for multiple practices. The CG, on the other hand, was taught through traditional teaching without any CALL tools available. At the termination of the intervention, the vocabulary test was employed as a posttest to both groups to assess the learners’ vocabulary enhancement. The EG outperformed the CG. Findings have led to the reasonable interpretation that L2 vocabulary learning was more productive when the CALL-enhanced flashcard program was utilized for the learning processes.
... 58). Based on the above definitions, m-learning has a wide range of coverage including primary education (Crompton et al., 2017), higher education (Naciri et al., 2020), business (Teodorescu, 2015), etc. The attempts to incorporate m-learning into language teaching and learning, a relatively recent concern with not even more than three decades of maturity (Ng et al., 2020), can be subsumed under the area generally known as mobile-assisted language learning (MALL). ...
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Purpose This study examines the importance of English Mobile Learning research as a foundation for lifelong and sustainable education from different points of view, including those of technology innovation experts, psychologists and educators. It aims to explore the current status and relevant research trends through the application of bibliometric mapping and bibliometric analysis. Design/methodology/approach For this study, all Web of Science records (in total 5,343) from 2000 to 2020 in the field of English Mobile Learning were analyzed using the VOSviewer and CiteSpace software tools. The WoS built-in functions, including “Refine” and “Analyze,” were employed to perform the bibliometric analysis. The study further analyzed a sample of the five most-cited articles to identify the previous studies with the highest quality or impact. Findings The results showed that research in English Mobile Learning is growing quickly and steadily with a noticeable emphasis on various device-based technologies and applications. The study also discusses the key implications for research institutions, education policymakers and academicians, and identifies the most prominent avenues for future research on English Mobile Learning. Moreover, the results shared in this review highlight the most important and emerging areas of research in the field. Originality/value This article is the most recent bibliographic review of literature that particularly addresses the English Mobile Learning research during the past two decades.
... In Crompton and Burke (2020), it was reported that 46% of the time mobile devices are used to replicate activities that can be performed without technology. Crompton et al. (2017) reported that most of the studies were carried out at the primary education level. Research has also been interested in understanding the effect that mobile learning has on student learning (Talan, 2020). ...
... In the future, the use of digital technology will become a necessity within the educational model and mobile devices, due to their characteristics, will play an important role [19]. The most common use of this technology, applied in teaching with this type of devices, is mobile applications [20]. The development of these educational applications must take into account the quality of information, images, and sounds, as well as accessibility and usability [21]. ...
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Currently, mobile devices are widely used as a support in education for teaching and learning of multiple academic subjects. An example of this is educational mobile applications, which in recent years have been massively developed and have generated multiple downloads for use in the classroom. Despite their features and benefits, the use of mobile devices such as smartphones is not usually allowed in classrooms due to the distraction they can generate. This paper aims to evidence the use of mobile devices in education and why it should be used as a support in the educational model. To do this, it is proposed to compare two teaching-learning methodologies and identify whether the use of mobile applications can influence the specific education of an engineering subject. The methodologies were tested in the classroom, focusing on IP addressing and network numbering systems, with two groups of students: an experimental group and a control group. At the end of the experiment, their performance was evaluated using a questionnaire. The answers of this questionnaire were subjected to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and hypotheses were proposed to identify whether the use of a mobile application used as a support in the educational model has benefits in learning. The results indicate that educational mobile applications can be helpful in the teaching-learning process and at present, education can benefit from the use of this innovative learning methodology.
... The features of mobile devices, such as being accessible anywhere and anytime, being personalized, allowing students to learn at their own pace, and allowing easy and fast communication with other people during the learning process, make them suitable in learning environments (Gocheva et al., 2020). Due to their rapidly advancing functionality, mobile devices are frequently used in learning environments (Crompton et al., 2017). Research has shown that students between 8 and 12 years old spend an average of 1 h 17 min per day playing mobile games (Rideout & Robb, 2019). ...
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This book brings together a collection of work from around the world in order to consider effective STEM, robotics, and mobile apps education from a range of perspectives. It presents valuable perspectives—both practical and theoretical—that enrich the current STEM, robotics, and mobile apps education agenda. As such, the book makes a substantial contribution to the literature and outlines the key challenges in research, policy, and practice for STEM education, from early childhood through to the first school-age education. The audience for the book includes college students, teachers of young children, college and university faculty, and professionals from fields other than education who are unified by their commitment to the care and education of young children.
... New media under the 5G era makes a breakthrough of time and space in learning providing an interactive and virtual environment. These characteristics are related to those of today's college students, who are seeking novelty and valuing personality [5]. The new media heavily affected the lives and studies of college students. ...
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With the advancement of digital technology, new tools and methods in education are being developed to improve teaching and learning. The use of technology in educational activities improves the functional, cognitive, and psychomotor skills of students. This study investigated the application of mobile media in the improvement of ideological and political education. The concepts, features, and types of the new media under 5G are defined, and specific forms, opportunities, and challenges of applications of new media in the ideological and political education of colleges are analyzed. The use of new media applications among college students is investigated using the “xuexi.cn” application software. Results show that various mobile applications of new media have the best foreground in the media technologies. Applying new media technologies to ideological and political education is not just an innovation in the method of ideological and political education but also is an extension and supplement to traditional ideological and political classes. Colleges should use new media technologies effectively and scientifically to create a good environment for college students and help them get a better knowledge of ideological and political education.
... The results showed that questionnaire surveys represent the primary research method used in 77% of the analyzed Blockchain adoption studies. These outcomes agree with some of the earlier systematic reviews in the technology adoption domain [77][78][79][80], which concluded that questionnaire surveys were the most common data collection method. In terms of the Blockchain, these results contradict what Frizzo-Barker et al. [81] reported, in which comparative studies were the primary method used in most of the analyzed articles. ...
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Blockchain technologies have received considerable attention from academia and industry due to their distinctive characteristics, such as data integrity, security, decentralization, and reliability. However, their adoption rate is still scarce, which is one of the primary reasons behind conducting studies related to users’ satisfaction and adoption. Determining what impacts the use and adoption of Blockchain technologies can efficiently address their adoption challenges. Hence, this systematic review aimed to review studies published on Blockchain technologies to offer a thorough understanding of what impacts their adoption and discuss the main challenges and opportunities across various sectors. From 902 studies collected, 30 empirical studies met the eligibility criteria and were thoroughly analyzed. The results confirmed that the technology acceptance model (TAM) and technology–organization–environment (TOE) were the most common models for studying Blockchain adoption. Apart from the core variables of these two models, the results indicated that trust, perceived cost, social influence, and facilitating conditions were the significant determinants influencing several Blockchain applications. The results also revealed that supply chain management is the main domain in which Blockchain applications were adopted. Further, the results indicated inadequate exposure to studying the actual use of Blockchain technologies and their continued use. It is also essential to report that existing studies have examined the adoption of Blockchain technologies from the lens of the organizational level, with little attention paid to the individual level. This review is believed to improve our understanding by revealing the full potential of Blockchain adoption and opening the door for further research opportunities.
... This can also be used to determine the skill level of the student and the difficulty level of a lesson dynamically, based on the behavior of multiple users over time. Thus, the proposed study supports to address some of the current limitations and challenges in the filed [19], [20]. ...
Conference Paper
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The popularity of m-learning has created endless possibilities for improving education. Mobile based educational applications assist to enhance knowledge, provide personalized learning experience, support interactivity and accessibility to different learning content. Among many different features in m-learning applications, competency-based adaptive delivery of content is an area that is still under study. This study presents a rule-based algorithm to dynamically recommend competency-based interactive assessments to learners. In our approach, the competency levels are calculated using constraints concerning the learner and the assessments, which are then used to determine the difficulty level of the succeeding assessment. This adaptive algorithm obtained a success rate of 86.11\% from the evaluation.
... Reviews that have language learning as one of their subject domains include those conducted by Baran (2014), Frohberg et al. (2009), Hwang and Tsai (2011), Korkmaz (2015), and Sönmez et al. (2018). On the other hand, authorities like Crompton et al. (2017), Krull and Duart (2017), and Pimmer et al. (2016) have carried out systematic reviews on mobile learning in which language learning was one of the key subject domains. In this case, meta-analyses with language learning components have been conducted by scholars such as Chee et al. (2017), Mahdi (2017), Sung et al. (2016), Tingir et al. (2017), and Wu et al. (2012), while Taj et al.'s (2016) meta-analysis focuses exclusively on MLL within an EFL context. ...
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There has been a growing number of reviews of mobile language learning (MLL) conducted on various aspects of this field of study over the last two decades. However, unlike in other fields, there is a paucity of overviews of reviews that assess and integrate findings from multiple reviews, and that compare and contrast such findings, or establish gaps in existing reviews. The current overview examined 17 review studies published between 2010 and 2018, and investigated twenty-three characteristics extracted from these reviews with a view to comparing them and synthesising the main findings of these reviews. The selection criteria used were: reviews published between 2010 and June 2018, reviews published in peer-reviewed journals, use of at least one bibliographic database, reviews focusing on mobile language learning (MLL) or having MLL as one of the learning domains, and reviews published in English. Some of the findings of this overview are: most reviews were qualitative in nature and few of them had clearly and precisely formulated purposes; there is a lack of theoretical frameworks by the majority of these review studies; there were 25 precise and specific mobile device typologies reported by eleven reviews, of which personal digital assistants (PDAs) and mobile phones were the two most reported mobile device types, respectively; language was the most reported subject area followed by mathematics; and fewer reviews mentioned and specified their research designs, their coding procedures, their inter-rater reliability agreement, and their quality assessment. Finally, English as a foreign language (EFL) was the major target language and vocabulary learning was the main focus of MLL. Resumen Un número creciente de revisiones del aprendizaje de idiomas móvil (MLL) se ha realizado sobre varios aspectos de este campo de estudio durante las últimas dos décadas. Sin embargo, a diferencia de otros campos, hay una escasez de resúmenes de revisiones que evalúan e integran hallazgos de múltiples revisiones, y que comparan y contrastan tales hallazgos, o establezcan brechas en revisiones existentes. El resumen actual examinó 17 estudios de revisión publicados entre 2010 y 2018, e investigó veintitrés características extraídas de estas revisiones con el fin de compararlas y sintetizar los principales hallazgos de estas revisiones. Los criterios de selección utilizados fueron: revisiones publicadas entre 2010 y junio de 2018, revisiones publicadas en revistas revisadas por pares, uso de al menos una base de datos bibliográfica, revisiones centradas en el aprendizaje de idiomas móvil (MLL) o tener MLL como uno de los dominios de aprendizaje, y revisiones publicadas en inglés. Algunas de las conclusiones de este resumen son: la mayoría de las revisiones fueron de naturaleza cualitativa y pocas de ellas tenían propósitos formulados de manera clara y precisa; faltan marcos teóricos en la mayoría de estos estudios de revisión; hubo 25 tipologías de dispositivos móviles precisas y específicas reportadas por once revisiones, de las cuales los asistentes digitales personales (PDA) y los teléfonos móviles fueron los dos tipos de dispositivos móviles más reportados, respectivamente; el lenguaje fue el área temática más reportada seguida por las matemáticas; y menos revisiones mencionaron y especificaron sus diseños de investigación, sus procedimientos de codificación, su acuerdo de confiabilidad entre evaluadores y su evaluación de la calidad. Finalmente, el inglés como lengua extranjera (EFL) fue el principal idioma de destino y el aprendizaje de vocabulario fue el enfoque principal de MLL.
... The goal in this study is to observe how academic learning is impacted by smartphones. Crompton et al. (2017) narrated that 62% out of 113 papers analyzed showed constructive learning was facilitated by using mobile phones. In terms of research in this field in Bangladesh, many papers have examined various aspects like smartphone addiction, motivations, etc. among undergraduate students (Ahmed et al., 2020;Al-Zaman, 2019;Hossain and Ahmed, 2016). ...
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This study explores the numerous effects smartphones have on learning among postgraduate students. Research objectives were formulated from the gaps in literature which comprise of exploring influential factors, pros and cons along with academic performance, which surround smartphone usage in an educational setting. Moreover, this study followed a cross-sectional research design consisting of a purposive sampling technique. Template analysis was conducted on data collected via telephonic interviews. Altogether, the results revealed that 40% of respondents believe that the internet is a key influential factor when it comes to using smartphones for educational purposes. In addition, many of the benefits and drawbacks of smartphone usage in learning were highlighted by the students. Seventy per cent vouched for being able to learn while away from laptops whereas 60% said it was distracting. Plus, 80% of respondents perceive that smartphone usage does not have an impact on their academic standing. They associated more importance to the primary ways of learning through computers and laptops. Assessments were also drawn using popular theoretical concepts like Goodhue and Thompson’s Technology-to-Performance Chain (TPC) model. Henceforth, this study has enriched the existing literature in terms of novel contributions. It is recommended that future researchers conduct experiments on a larger sample size to further enrich smartphone literature.
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OBJECTIVE In the education field innovation and technology has been the continues influential element within the vast array of education strategies, pedagogies, plans of action and processes which are designed to enhanced literacy in the field of education. During Pandemic Teaching fraternity are realizing the need and applicability in the education sector, thus focusing on technologies which helped in tutoring in the professional growth of all stake holders. The research paper focuses on the importance of Technology in education sector and its importance for overall development of the students. Methodology: The researcher has made an attempt to find the prominent factors which are responsible for the innovation in teaching learning and evaluation and adapting these changes in field of academics. For the same the data collected was from teachers teaching at graduate and postgraduate level and students of degree college. Findings: Adaptation to Technology in Teaching, Learning and Evaluation in Academics was found significant in academics during pandemic. 1.0 INTRODUCTION In the education field innovation and technology has been the continues influential element within the vast array of education strategies, pedagogies, plans of action and processes which are designed to enhanced literacy in the field of education. During Pandemic Teaching fraternity are realizing the need and applicability in the education sector, thus focusing on technologies which helped in tutoring in the professional growth of all stake holders. Although technological know-how is sooner or later being built-in into education, its use for educating and getting to know nonetheless stays a challenge. Despite the truth that many faculties nowadays are privileged to have prepared get right of entry to technology, educated teachers, and a beneficial coverage environment, the use of science in the lecture room is nevertheless low. Some attribute low degrees of technological know-how use in training to the pedagogical beliefs of teachers. Today, during pandemic applied sciences used to enhance and facilitate gaining knowledge of can be located everywhere. Leaving different contextual elements to the aspect-such as unequal get admission to technological improvements and related applied sciences throughout faculties and districts-we can solely say that we have embraced science in training when it is used for both educating and learning. With the incorporation of science into schools, the predominant motive is to exchange how instructors and college students gather, access, analyse, existing and transmit information. 2.0 REVIEW OF LITERATURE Kayode Emmanuel Oyetade et al., (2020) have made an attempt to say that technology is advancing faster today than ever before with evidence of its impact in all facets of our lives. With the spread of the novel COVID-19 pandemic across the world, schools were closed as part of lockdown measures to contain the virus thereby disrupting academic curricula. Academic institutions leveraged ICTs to virtually engage students and teachers. Technology adoption will become a new reality for teaching and learning processes. This research also adds to new literature on COVID-19 in relation to its effect on academic curriculum across the world. Jo Shan Fu (2013) has summarized the relevant research on the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in education. Specifically, it reviews studies that have touched upon the merits of ICT integration in schools, barriers or challenges encountered in the use of ICT, factors influencing successful ICT integration, in-service and pre-service teachers' attitudes, perceptions, and confidence in using ICT as well as the importance of school culture in the use of ICT. This review discusses gaps in the literature and the directions that future studies may take to address these gaps.
Conference Paper
Language learning with the help of mobile phones is considered as a new educational technology. Recently, due to the spread of different technologies, mobile phones have become popular among students to enhance learning. In this study, researchers investigated the role of using cell-phone, as a new learning tool, in facilitating the learning of male and female undergraduate students and its potential as a viable alternative to face-to-face classes during the Corona epidemic. In addition, the researchers examined the advantages and disadvantages of using cell-phones in online classes based on the English language students’ opinions. For this purpose, survey study was utilized. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were the methods of data collection in this research. The sample consisted of 57 male and female EFL undergraduate students (semesters 3 to 7) at Islamic Azad University of Najafabad. Results indicated the widespread use of mobile phones to learn English among these students. In addition, using cell-phones had a positive effect on facilitating teamwork and collaboration among the English learners, researching and learning online, and communicating to learn without being obliged to be in one place. However, students claimed that loss of motivation for deep learning due to the constant availability of information, limited memory, and the high cost of cell phones were among the weaknesses of this device. This study reveals that familiarity with modern devices, especially the use of cell-phones for learning English in the context of Covid-19 can add very important experiences to the reserves of our educational system.
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This mixed-method study endeavored to solicit the perspectives of Iranian collegiate students passing the obligatory course of medical English through NAVID Learning Management System and its acceptance during COVID-19 pandemic. Utilizing Technology Acceptance Model, this study also sought to examine the possible effect gender, academic degree, instructional mode, and e-learning duration in NAVID may have on the participants' attitudes. An online survey was employed to gather data from 78 Iranian students. Semi-structured interviews with ten participants were conducted as well to shed more light on the quantitative data regarding main advantages and disadvantages of medical English learning through NAVID. The data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics along with inductive thematic analysis, respectively. Findings revealed that Iranian collegiate medical students viewed NAVID as a comprehensive e-learning platform to be favorable in terms of its system/service quality, student/educational service quality, and perceived satisfaction, but its perceived satisfaction was not aligned with their needs. Moreover, neither the individual variables, (viz., age and academic degree), nor the instructional variables (viz., instructional mode and e-learning duration) were predictors of the discrepancies among the participants in their perspectives and acceptance of NAVID. Learning ubiquitously and lacking face-to-face communication were the main advantage and disadvantage of learning medical English through NAVID, respectively. Results revealed that although under the Covid-19 pandemic the acceptance of NAVID and students' satisfaction with its use might not be related to the individual and instructional variables in the medical English courses, it might not be the case in others.
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Children today are born into a world surrounded by technology. For this “i‐Generation” (Twenge, 2017), most aspects of daily life can be conducted online, including socialising, shopping, learning and enga ging with the world around them, and the lines between the online and offline life are becoming increasingly blurred. OFCOM, (2019) reports that 82% of 5–7‐year‐olds go online regularly, averaging 9.5 h per week, while for 12–15‐year olds, 99% go online regularly, aver aging 20.5 h per week. This increasingly technological world has in fluenced educational practice, with the use of technology in classrooms evolving from desktop computers, to interactive white boards, to the more recent use of tablets and other mobile devices to deliver the school curriculum. A recent development (UNCRC, 2021) has seen the Convention on the Rights of the Child adopt General Comment 25 which recognises children's rights in the digital world. This includes children's right to the educational benefits that tech nology can bring, and places responsibilities on States to ensure schools are equipped with the infrastructure, knowledge and skills to support this.
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The purpose of this research is to see the effect of a mobile technologies-integrated cooperative instruction (MTICI) workshop for in-service science teachers upon teachers' perception and their students' understanding and satisfaction. The participants were 30 science teachers and 136 students. The research tools were as follows: 1) The MTICI workshop for in-service science teachers, 2) a teachers' self-assessment form on understanding about the MTICI 3) lesson plans focused on MTICI regarding the topic of rivers and water quality, 4) a test of students' understanding in the topic of rivers and water quality and the students' satisfaction questionnaire regarding the use of mobile technologies of the teacher. Frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation were used for data analysis. The results showed that (1) the teachers who have participated in the workshop perceived the use of mobile technologies in the science classroom with the highest level of average understanding; (2) the students' post-understanding of the topic of rivers and water quality was significantly higher than their pre-learning counterpart understanding at the .05 level of statistical significance; and (3) the students' overall satisfaction of the MTICI was at a high level.
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We explored the critical factors associated with iLearning that impact students’ learning performance and identified the factors with a notable influence to help managers in higher education institutions increase the effectiveness of iLearning for students. We initially synthesised 4 main dimensions (including 26 criteria): performance expectancy, lecturers’ influence, quality of service, and personal innovativeness. Subsequently, we conducted surveys in two stages. First, by studying a group of students with experience using iLearning at Taiwanese universities, we extracted 5 critical dimensions (including 18 criteria) through a factor analysis. Second, by studying a group of senior educators and practitioners in Taiwan, we prioritised the dimensions and criteria through the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). We found that performance expectancy is the top critical dimension, and the top five critical criteria pertain to enhancing the learning performance, increasing the learning participation, altering learning habits, ensuring access at all times, and enabling prompt use of learning resources. Moreover, we recommend several suggestions for the relevant managers to enhance the students’ iLearning performance.
Chapter
Serious games, which are an important and promising alternative to the traditional learning environment, are used in different learning areas. Many empirical studies on serious games as an educational tool have yielded positive results. Games improve students’ learning and motivation in the domain of STEM, in particular math. Many math games have been developed to support student learning and to be fun. This research aims to design, develop, and test the usability of a mobile game for primary school students to be used in mathematics education. Usability and user experience are important measures of the quality of software. For serious games to be effective in supporting learning, games must be usable in a way that supports student learning. For this purpose, a 2D mobile game was developed with Unity and usability tests and conducted with 10 primary school students. As a result of the usability test carried out for the current study, the efficiency of the game was evaluated and solutions were considered for the deficiencies identified. Looking at the results, the participants generally liked the game. However, the learnability of our educational game is weak. In addition, the study identifies various limitations of the game and areas for improvement. The game mechanics need to be improved in order to increase efficiency. The memorability level of the game is low. Participants often made the mistake at the start of each level of forgetting to pop at least two balloons. Suggestions on how to overcome these limitations are presented. For future studies, we intend to develop our game in view of the deficiencies highlighted here in order to offer a more efficient and usable learning material. It is hoped that this study will contribute to studies aimed at developing digital educational games by suggesting ideas for reducing usability problems.
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The article focuses on the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK or TPACK) framework among in-service music teachers in primary schools. Narrative research has allowed us to identify the environment and important others that lead to the release and maintenance of sparks of interest in using technology within various educational models and supporting influential solutions. Longitudinal studies and identification of informal environments within learning ecologies have allowed us to formulate the optimal paths to achieving TPACK competence. The study of a specific group of music teachers encourages comparative research between various teacher groups; this means comparing TPACK-competent arts teachers with teachers of other subjects.
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Bu çalışma, öğretmen eğitiminde mobil öğrenmenin kullanımındaki son eğilimleri ortaya çıkarmayı amaçlamıştır. Bu kapsamda 11 Kasım 2020 tarihine kadar yayınlanmış olan ve bu araştırmanın kriterlerini karşılayan makaleler incelenmiştir. Sonuç olarak, SSCI'de indekslenen 58 makale için sistematik inceleme ve bibliyometrik analiz yapılmıştır. Araştırma sonuçlarına göre; 2016 yılı en çok çalışmanın yayınlandığı yıl olmakla beraber, incelenen araştırmalarda en çok kullanılan anahtar kelimenin “mobil öğrenme” ve özet bölümlerinde en çok kullanılan kelimenin ise “öğretmen” olduğu görülmüştür. Sonuçlar ayrıca en çok çalışmanın yapıldığı kıtanın Asya kıtası olduğunu ve ABD'nin en fazla çalışmanın yapıldığı ülke olduğunu göstermiştir. Ayrıca en çok kullanılan araştırma yöntemleri nicel araştırmalar iken, anket en çok tercih edilen veri toplama aracı olmuştur. En sık kullanılan örnekleme yöntemi, örneklem grubu ve örneklem büyüklüğü sırasıyla amaçlı örnekleme, öğretmenler ve 1-50 arasında katılımcıya sahip araştırmalardır. Ayrıca, araştırmanın diğer bulguları sunulmuş, tartışılmış ve önerilerde bulunulmuştur. Çalışma sonuçları; araştırmacılar, öğretmenler ve politika yapıcılar için öğretmen eğitiminde mobil öğrenmenin kullanımıyla ilgili araştırma eğilimleri hakkında farklı bir bakış açısı sunmaktadır.
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The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from the year 2000 onward. Major findings include that most of the studies focused on designing systems for mobile learning, followed by a combination of evaluating the effects of mobile learning and investigating the affective domain during mobile learning. The majority of the studies were conducted in the area of life sciences in informal, elementary (5–11 years) settings. Mobile devices were used in this strand of science easily within informal environments with real-world connections. A variety of research methods were employed, providing a rich research perspective. As the use of mobile learning continues to grow, further research regarding the use of mobile technologies in all areas and levels of science learning will help science educators to expand their ability to embrace these technologies.
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Mobile devices such as laptops, personal digital assistants, and mobile phones have become a learning tool with great potential in both classrooms and outdoor learning. Although there have been qualitative analyses of the use of mobile devices in education, systematic quantitative analyses of the effects of mobile-integrated education are lacking. This study performed a meta-analysis and research synthesis of the effects of integrated mobile devices in teaching and learning, in which 110 experimental and quasiexperimental journal articles published during the period 1993–2013 were coded and analyzed. Overall, there was a moderate mean effect size of 0.523 for the application of mobile devices to education. The effect sizes of moderator variables were analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of mobile learning in different levels of moderator variables were synthesized based on content analyses of individual studies. The results of this study and their implications for both research and practice are discussed.
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In much of the world educational institutions prescribe, procure, provide, and control institutional technology, and hence in many respects constrain and define the nature of education and the interpretation of learning. However, the majority of people choose, use, own, and understand a vast but diverse range of powerful personal technologies that allow them to create, store, and transmit information, images, ideas, resources, and knowledge, and to connect to communities and to each other and hence, in very different senses, to engage in learning. Central to these personal technologies are mobile devices and central to this learning is 'mobile learning' (Traxler, 2007, 2008; Winters, 2006). If institutions chose to work with student-owned devices, they would increase their capacity to deliver inclusion with innovation but would find the transformation challenging. This paper addresses the tension between educational institutions aspiring to provide students with the technology for learning, specifically and increasingly mobile devices, and supporting students using their own devices. It explores the nature and implications of the strategic challenge, represented as a potential disjunction between societies at large and their institutions of formal learning, and the practical challenge of using student devices to consolidate, resource, sustain, and embed mobile learning. Resolving this tension is crucial for innovation, inclusion, and transformation.
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To demonstrate the benefits of applying meta ethnography to the synthesis of qualitative research, by means of a worked example. Four papers about lay meanings of medicines were arbitrarily chosen. Noblit and Hare's seven-step process for conducting a meta ethnography was employed: getting started; deciding what is relevant to the initial interest; reading the studies; determining how the studies are related; translating the studies into one another; synthesising translations; and expressing the synthesis. Six key concepts were identified: adherence/compliance; self-regulation; aversion; alternative coping strategies; sanctions; and selective disclosure. Four second-order interpretations (derived from the chosen papers) were identified, on the basis of which four third-order interpretations (based on the key concepts and second-order interpretations) were constructed. These were all linked together in a line of argument that accounts for patients' medicine-taking behaviour and communication with health professionals in different settings. Third-order interpretations were developed which were not only consistent with the original results but also extended beyond them. It is possible to use meta ethnography to synthesise the results of qualitative research. The worked example has produced middle-range theories in the form of hypotheses that could be tested by other researchers.
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The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This research was a systematic review of 36 studies in mobile learning in mathematics from the year 2000 onward. Eight new findings emerged: (1) The primary purpose of most studies was to focus on evaluating mobile learning. (2) Case studies and experimental design were the main research methods. (3) Most studies report positive learning outcomes; (4) Mobile phones were the mobile device used most often. (5) Elementary school settings were the most common research context. (6) The majority of researchers did not identify a specific mathematical concept being studied. (7) The majority of the studies took place in formal educational contexts; and (8) research on mobile learning in mathematics is geographically diverse.
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The purpose of this literature review is to examine data-based studies published on mobile learning in K–12 from 2007 to the present. In total, 63 studies from 15 refereed journals were selected for analysis. The findings are organized in four themes: (a) comparison studies, (b) nocomparison studies, (c) mobilized learning, and (d) academic content areas. The findings showed research was primarily exploratory in nature and focused on understanding the educational affordances of using mobile devices in instructional practices. Affordances examined in the studies were identified within the contexts of multiple academic disciplines. Additionally, trends were observed, and critical issues to consider for future research are discussed.
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This paper describes a case study of a program called WATCH: Workshop for Actively Thinking Computationally and Historically. The focus of the program and this paper was on using mobile application development to promote historical thinking using a plantation site visit as the focus of inquiry. WATCH was delivered during an academic enrichment youth program at a major research university in the Southeast and served a total of 30 African American and Latino high school students from low socio-economic backgrounds. Through the theoretical framework of historical thinking, this case study provides descriptions of the class sessions, students׳ perceptions of and interests in history and students level of historical thinking through their apps. We make suggestions about how the instructional activities could be adapted for classrooms, discuss the tensions of using technology and inquiry pedagogy to support and promote historical learning, and review the program׳s impact on students׳ agency as learners and critical consumers and producers of historical accounts.
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Tablets devices for student use present several advantages over laptops and desktops including portability, touch-screen features and numerous applications. However, the magnitude of apps available also presents a challenge for secondary science educators who struggle to select content-appropriate applications that support the development of science literacy and science content acquisition. This paper details the process of creating, developing and testing a mobile science application rubric so as to aid secondary science classroom teachers in selecting and rating science applications for a K-12 student target population and its curricular needs. Quantitative and qualitative data collected during four design cycles resulted in the Mobile App Selection for Science (MASS) Rubric, comprising six items on a four-point response scale. Further comparison of the science content-specific MASS rubric with a general mobile app selection rubric (Evaluation Rubric for Mobile Applications; ERMA) revealed expected results with three item pairs (Pair A, Pair C, and Pair D) demonstrating concurrent validity through significant correlations and one pair (Pair B) displaying the expected divergent validity. Additionally, paired t-tests among each pair indicated a significant difference in participants' ratings of the apps using the two rubrics. The differences in ratings were also in the expected direction given the content-specific nature of MASS versus the more general nature of ERMA.
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Results of the mobile or ubiquitous learning papers analyzed by six major technology-based learning journals and published in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) database from 2001 to 2010 are presented. It was found that by dividing the past 10 years into two periods, the number of papers published during the second 5 years is four times that of the first 5 years, implying that mobile and ubiquitous learning research has greatly advanced in the recent 5 years. From 2001 to 2010, research samples in higher education were selected most, followed by elementary school students and high school students. In comparison with the studies conducted in the first 5 years, studies focused on the learning domains of engineering, arts and language, science and social science have significantly increased in the second 5 years by 10, 7, 5 and 4.5 times, respectively. Major contributing countries of mobile and ubiquitous articles in the first and the second 5 years of 2001 to 2010 are found to be the US, the UK, and Taiwan.
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As mobile devices become ubiquitous, it is necessary to analyze if and how these devices can be used for learning. This systematic review is part of a larger review that analyzed 21 mobile learning research studies published from 2005-present. Eleven studies that focused specifically on student learning outcomes and processes are summarized in this review in order to better understand the direction of mobile learning in mainstream education. Overall, studies were found to be positive and indicated several benefits of using mobile devices for learning including an increase in achievement, productivity, engagement, and motivation. This paper also highlights recommendations for future research and practice in the field of mobile learning, specifically focusing on the way personal mobile device ownership may influence learning both inside and outside the classroom.
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The launch of the International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning is one of several indicators that mobile learning globally is reaching a critical and sustainable momentum and identity. The past six or seven years have seen a host of pilots and initiatives across sectors and across countries and these have established firstly that mobile learning takes learning to individuals, communities and countries where access to learning was challenging or problematic and secondly that mobile learning enhances, enriches and extends how learning is understood. Environmental factors have meant that this development has been haphazard. The mobile learning community is now faced with broader challenges of scale, durability, equity, embedding and blending in addition to the earlier and more specific challenges of pedagogy and technology, but these developments take place in the context of societies where mobile devices, systems and technologies have a far wider impact than just mobile learning as it is currently conceived. This paper looks at the definition and evolution of mobile learning as the starting point for a discussion of this wider impact.
What is the future of mobile learning in education? [Special Section] Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento (RUSC) Mobile learning applications in higher education
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