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Humanitarian Assistance through Mobile Cash Transfers: Evaluation of the Emergency Cash-First Response to food security in drought-affected communities in Southern Zimbabwe through a mobile cash transfer project, Commissioned by CARE International and DFID in Zimbabwe

Authors:
  • Ruzivo Trust
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... The fact that two thirds of the estimated 60 million unbanked adults worldwide who receive government transfers in cash own a mobile phone makes the technology particularly suitable for reaching unbanked SCT recipients, providing vast opportunities for advancing financial inclusion (Demirgüç-Kunt et al., 2017). Moreover, Tirivayi et al. (2016) note that mobile cash transfers are about 20-25% cheaper than in-kind modalities like food transfers, and also tend to be faster and less complex to administer than manual cash transfers. Using mobile phones to deliver payments also opens up opportunities for the delivery of other cellphonebased services, including SMS-based communication with beneficiaries or the sending of 'nudging' messages aimed at encouraging beneficiaries to access healthcare, education services or information sessions (Oberländer & Brossmann, 2014). ...
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