Article

Prevalence of gastro-intestimal helminths of wild animals in Kainji Lake National Park and Federal College of wild life management, New-Bussa, Niger state, Nigeria

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... They can cause substantial losses in production or even acute clinical signs and death (Wall, 2000). There is abundant evidence of parasitic infections in wildlife worldwide and studies have demonstrated that they may be carriers of gastrointestinal parasites (Ogunji et al., 1984;Muriuki et al., 1998;Oyeleke & Edungbola 2001;Karere & Munene, 2002;, ectoparasites (Kalema-Zikusoka et al., 2002;Jongejan & Uilenberg, 2004) and haemoparasites (Nizeyi et al., 2001;Mutani et al., 2003;Munang'andu et al., 2012). In addition to the physical injury caused by parasites, some serve as hosts of many viral, rickettsial, bacterial and protozoan diseases (Ghandour et al., 1995;Murray et al., 2000;Alvarado-Rybak et al., 2016). ...
... In addition to the physical injury caused by parasites, some serve as hosts of many viral, rickettsial, bacterial and protozoan diseases (Ghandour et al., 1995;Murray et al., 2000;Alvarado-Rybak et al., 2016). In Nigeria, wildlife conservation areas such as Yankari Game Reserve (YGR) and Sumu Wildlife Park (SWP) are natural heritage and means of generating revenue (Ogunji et al., 1984;Olokesusi, 1990;Oyeleke & Edungbola 2001;Eneji et al., 2016) and parasitic infections may constrain the health of the variety of wildlife species in these conservation areas. ...
... The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites found in this study could be due to the favourable environment that enables the survival of the GIT parasites couple with the feeding habit of the wildlife species. A finding which is consistent with previous studies from sub-saharan Africa (Oyeleke & Edungbola, 2001;Van Wyk & Boomker, 2011;Mbaya & Udendeye 2011;Munang'andu et al., 2012;Swai & Kaaya, 2012). In this study, waterbucks from YGR and elands from SWP had the highest burden of GIT parasites than the other wildlife species sampled. ...
Article
The role of wildlife in the epidemiology of parasites in Yankari Game Reserve and Sumu Wildlife Park in Bauchi State, Nigeria was investigated by analysis of blood, faeces and ticks collected from 106 wildlife including 4 elephants (Loxodonta africana), 11 waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymus), 1 hartbeest (Alcelaphus baselaphus caama), 24 elands (Taurotragus oryx), 53 zebras (Equus quagga crawshayi), 1 kudu (Tragelaphus streptsiceros) and 12 wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus). Blood samples were examined for haemoparasites by classical parasitological techniques i.e Geimsa's stained thin, thick and buffy coat blood smear. Whereas faecal samples were examined for gastrointestinal tract (GIT) parasites using floatation and sedimentation techniques while ticks were identified morphologically. Overall prevalence of haemoparasites was fifty six percent (56%). The identified haemoparasites were Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina, Babesia bovis, Theileria equi, Babesia caballi, Trypanosoma spp and Ehrlichia ruminantium. Haemoparasites identified alone or in combination with others had a significant (P <0.05) effect on mean PCV of infected animals. Sixty percent (60%) of the wildlife species were infected with GIT parasites. Types of GIT parasites identified were two protozoans (Balantidium coli and Eimeria spp) and helminths from eighteen genera including ten nematodes (Strongyle type-egg, Dictyocaulus, Cooperia, Strongyloides, Haemonchus, Trichuris, Trichonema, Oesophagostomum, Bunostomum, and Ancylostoma), four Trematodes (Fasciola, Schistosoma, Paramphistomum and Gastrodiscus) and three Cestodes (Anoplocephala, Taenia and Moniezia. Four genera of ticks, Amblyomma, Boophilus, Hyalomma and Rhipicephalus were identified on the wildlife species. Our findings indicated the presence of infective parasites in wildlife and potential risks of transmitting these parasites to in contact domestic animals and humans in the study area. Control measures should be focused on reducing parasitic infections by proper management of wildlife in the Game Reserves in Bauchi State, Nigeria. Keywords: Gastrointestinal parasites, Haemoparasites, Prevalence, Ticks, Wildlife
... They can cause substantial losses in production or even acute clinical signs and death [101]. There is abundant evidence of parasitic infections in wildlife worldwide and studies have demonstrated that they may be carriers of gastrointestinal parasites [102][103][104][105][106], ectoparasites [107,108] and haemoparasites [109][110][111]. Many wildlife species are capable of living with high parasite loads without any apparent ill-effect on their health [112]. ...
Chapter
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Disease outbreaks, epidemics or pandemics have been of importance for human and animal health worldwide and sparked enormous public interest. These outbreaks might be caused by known endemic pathogens or by emerging or re-emerging pathogens. Wildlife are the major reservoirs and responsible for most of these outbreaks. They play significant role in the transmission of several livestock diseases and pathogen spill-over may occur in complex socio-ecological systems at the wildlife-domestic animal interface which have been seldom studied. Interspecific pathogen spill-over at the wildlife-livestock interface have been of growing concern in the scientific community over the past years due to their impact on wildlife, livestock and human health. In this section the epidemiology of some viral infections (Foot and Mouth Disease and rabies), bacterial infections (Tuberculosis and brucellosis) and parasites (haemo and endo-parasites) at the wildlife-livestock interface and potential impacts to livestock production and conservation goal is described.
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