Article

Working with key players for psychological and mental health public services.

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Abstract

Key players must be located and identified in order to perform public service. For doing this, a model for organizing a societal mental health program, which includes the 3 agency categories of voluntary, official, and professional, is presented. It shows that psychologists can function in any community, from local to international, in each category. The author portrays some of the forces that turned him to public service. Then he cites his public service experience in various communities, such as the mental health association, the official mental health program, the psychological association, and the university. He identifies key players and explains methods of working with them. Finally, he summarizes some requisite skills for successful service activities. Primary among the skills are locating and relating to key community decision makers and understanding how the helping community functions.

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Article
Key players must be located and identified in order to perform public service. For doing this, a model for organizing a societal mental health program, which includes the three agency categories of voluntary, official, and professional, is presented. It shows that psychologists can function in any community from local to international in each category. The author portrays some of the forces that turned him to public service. Then he cites his public service experience in various communities, such as the mental health association, the official mental health program, the psychological association, and the university. He identifies key players and explains methods of working with them. Finally, he summarizes some requisite skills for successful service activities. Primary among the skills are locating and relating to key community decision makers and understanding how the helping community functions.
Chapter
In order for an account of models of service delivery in rural areas to have meaning, it is necessary to know something of the rural context and the issues involved that have given rise to those particular models. Rural people, and those professionals authorized to serve them, have of necessity invented a number of ingenious methods for providing the services that have been needed. It has not always been easy, and problems remain, but there have been some innovative models developed especially for rural mental health services. Because psychologists have been extensively involved in mental health services (in contrast to the other human services) and because much experience has been amassed by federal, state, and local government officials in attempting to meet rural mental health needs, this chapter will proceed from the perspective of mental health services. This is not to say, however, that many, if not most, of the same issues and problems would not also apply to the provision of other human services in rural areas.
Article
Traces the rapid emergence of community psychology and stresses the need for the generation of new knowledge on communities. The competent community is defined as one that is involved in the development and utilization of resources by community members and one in which there is increased sophistication in coping with problems and issues. The suggested role for community psychology in such a setting is (a) to foster growth and be prepared for the consequences of increased growth of hope and power (e.g., the rejection of the helpers); and (b) to facilitate dialog between those in power and those seeking it thus eliminating failures in community growth programs that may be brought on by a lack of built-in feedback mechanisms and a philosophy of those in power that fosters anticompetence and dependency. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
Presents information in support of continued federal funding of community mental health centers. Emphasis is placed on the program features of consultation, education and research, evaluation, and the direct treatment services of a center's program. The necessity of support for preventive efforts, the use of indigenous manpower, and training in special problem areas (alcoholism and narcotic addiction) is also stressed. It is felt that effective functioning of community mental health centers requires a continuing pattern of federal support, especially for those activities which are not inherently self-supporting.
Article
Since its publication in 1953, this book has become recognized as a seminal study in the field. Floyd Hunter spent more than a year interviewing people from the Negro section, labor element, and professional groups, including the decision makers themselves, in "Regional City," a metropolitan area of half a million. The graphic description of the city and its leaders as they unobtrusively run its life throws new light on the age-old relationship between the governed and the governors.
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