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Abstract

Dandelion leaves and roots have been used extensively over the years for its medicinal and health benefits. However, a systematic review of data indicates a paucity of knowledge on its use as an anti-diabetic herb. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion leaf and root powder in type 2 diabetic patients. Calculated sample size of sixty (60) Type 2 diabetic patients were recruited from the diabetes center of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana for the clinical study and randomized into three groups. In total the first group of participants received 45 g of dandelion leaf powder, second group received 45 g of dandelion root powder and third group (controls) received no treatment. The intervention groups consumed 5 g of dandelion each day for 9 days. Participants took 5 g of the treatment each day and fasting blood glucose (FBS) were monitored before and during the treatment periods and recorded into data capturing sheets. The results showed that 86.7% of the study participants were between the ages of 40 and 70 years, 53.33% and 10% were overweight and obese respectively. About 61% of these participants were females. Average caloric intakes of participants in all three groups increased over the study period but was not significant ( p > 0.05). Consumption of 5 g of dandelion leaf and root powder for nine (9) days significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose levels from 10.7 mmol/L to 7.5 mmol/L ( p < 0.05) and 10.5 mmol/L to 8.6 mmol/L ( p < 0.05) respectively of type two diabetic patients. For the control the average FBS rose from 10.8 mmol/L to 10.9 mmol/L, however this was not statistically significant ( p > 0.05). There was no difference in FBG between those who consumed the roots and those who consumed the leaves. Frequency of urination was not affected significantly by the consumption of dandelion leaves or roots. Inculcating traditional medicinal plants like dandelion into the management/treatment of diabetes may help improve the health and well-being of type 2 diabetic patients. Long term effect of dandelion consumption should be investigated.

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... The third group did not receive treatment. Both leaves and roots reduced fasting blood glucose, but the roots proved to be more effective (Iddrisu et al., 2016). ...
... Iddrisu et al. (2015); Iddrisu et al. (2016); Nnamdi et al. (2012) Dandelion Determine the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion leaves and roots among type 2 diabetic patients. ...
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The management of diabetes is crucial since that is the only option for this chronic non-communicable disease. The administration of medicinal drugs for the management of diabetes is critical. It is however important to note that some plants have components that confer anti-diabetic properties and may be of use especially in developing countries where there is limited access to healthcare. The aim of this review is to review studies that involved plants with anti-diabetic effects. Such plants as tea, mushroom, broccoli, garlic, moringa, ginseng, guava, onion, tiger nut, bush mango, okra, dates, bitter melon, dandelion, watermelon, and pumpkins may reduce diabetes risks, or even lower blood glucose in diabetes patients (notably type 2 diabetes). Phytoremediation via plant foods should not be underestimated in the management of diabetes.
... After taking the dandelion powder, fasting blood glucose was monitored before and during the treatment periods. The results showed that dandelion leaf and root powder significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose levels of type 2 diabetic patients compared with placebo group [59]. ...
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The protection of the liver as an essential organ in the body against oxidative stress and deleterious compounds has been the subject of recent investigations. Among different compounds, medicinal plants play an important role due to their hepatoprotective effects. Taraxacum officinale or “common dandelion” is a popular plant that has been traditionally used for its hepatoprotective effects. Currently, there are limited clinical studies on its hepatoprotective effects. The aim of this review article is to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of dandelion and its mechanism of action. We reviewed literature up to July 2019 on “Taraxacum officinale” or “dandelion” and hepatoprotection. Currently available pharmacological studies indicate that dandelion extracts have hepatoprotective effects against chemical agents due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The anti-inflammatory effects of dandelion, the prebiotic effects of its oligofructans, inhibitory effects against the release of lipopolysaccharides and fasting induced adipose factor, digestive enzymes, and enhancing effects of lipogenesis, reduce lipid accumulation and liver inflammation, which directly or indirectly improve the liver functions. Given emerging evidence on hepatoprotective effects of dandelion, designing large human clinical studies is essential.
... Dandelion is a widespread weed and has strong resistance to environmental adversities. It is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine which is rich in polysaccharides, phenolic acids, sterols and other substances, and has sterilization, antiinflammatory, anti-oxidation and immunity enhancement functions (Katrin et al., 2010;Iddrisu et al., 2016). With the improvement of health awareness, in recent years, dandelion has gradually become a new trend as a medicinal and edible vegetable in China, altering the wild occurrence of dandelion to artificial cultivation (Kuusi et al., 1984;Wang et al., 2017;Jiang et al., 2018). ...
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Dandelion ( Taraxacum spp.) is a widely distributed weed; in China, however, dandelion has been considered to be a kind of medicinal and edible vegetable in recent years. This transition from weed to vegetable requires corresponding cultivation and management. Thus, the production of dandelion on saline land was conducted based on the evaluation of dandelion salt tolerance. Low soil salt content (< 0.3%) did not significantly affect dandelion growth, and the salt tolerance threshold of dandelion ranged from 0.4% to 0.43% according to the correlation between salt content and morphological and physiological parameters, which was for guiding the preparation of saline land for dandelion field cultivation. Different fertilizer treatments significantly affected the leaf yield of dandelion, and the maximum fresh leaf yield of ~10.5 t ha ⁻¹ was obtained when urea was applied in batches at a ratio of 2:2:1 in the sowing, seedling and flowering stages, respectively. This research provided the theoretical and technical support for the cultivation on saline land, laying the foundation for further study of quality control for the cultivation of dandelion on saline land.
... Therefore, supplementation of aqueous extract of Monascus fermented rice in STZ and highcholesterol-diet fed rats for 30 days showed significant reduction of fasting blood glucose level (Rajasekaran et al., 2009). Likewise, Iddrisu et al. (2015) reported the hypoglycemic effect of dandelion leaves, root or extract on diabetic in both humans and animals (rats and mice). It was shown that regulation of glucose homeostasis in DM rats can occur due to the intake of a flavonol content, which may have an antioxidant role and also may protect cells against oxidative stress caused by STZ (Abdulazeez, 2014). ...
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