Conference Paper

Gamification, Geolocation and Sensors for Employee Motivation Towards Energy Conservation at the Workplace.

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

In an era of significant technological advancements, as well as dramatic changes in the business envi- ronment, the state of the workforce seems to remain problematic, with regards to motivation. Albeit prevailing societal clichés, that often seem to promote the idea that ‘the modern workplace provides for a far better experience than in the past’; the truth remains that modern employees bear a signifi- cant resemblance to their ancestors – regarding the emotional burden their jobs instil on them – and remain, in their majority, unmotivated. Gamification, a relatively new instrument in the “orchestra of motivation”, offers a promising alternative to the strict corporate rules and policies that usually dic- tate the employees’ conduct, by adhering to their intrinsic motivation. Simultaneously, two promising technological giants have risen, to invisibly, as well as ubiquitously accompany us in our every move. On one hand, the advancement of geolocation technologies has led to the introduction of location- based services and custom content delivery. On the other hand, sensors of all types and flavours, in- stalled to measure countless parameters of our surroundings, the workplace included. Through our study, we aim to investigate the effect of the application of these three technologies – Gamification, Geolocation and Sensors – isolated, or in concert, on employee motivation towards a common goal – energy conservation at the workplace.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... And so, the quantification of data is firstly captured by the machines equipped with the necessary technologies to transform action into bits of information, ranging from a simple push on a screen to the more sophisticated sensors utilized in tracking and quantification software, also widely promoted by gamification design (e.g. Whitson 2014; Kotsopoulos et al. 2016). "[…] All games (and gamified systems)," ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research on the impact of gameful experiences on the automation of labour and value creation is in need of a critical reformulation. The results presented in this study developed from a critical reading of the current literature on gamification and its internal struggles. I question what the gamification of work is, this time including knowledge collected by decades of academic research in the field of digital cultures and society, converging in a diverse yet attuned corpus of neomaterialist, post-anthropocentric, anti-Humanist, and intersectional theories of politics, algorithmic cultures and social justice (see Braidotti/Hlavajova 2017). Findings suggest the experimental development of gamification technologies materializes from an interest in governance through the automation of behavioural management, resulting in the forced correction of non-normative bodies through self-optimization. Beyond colonial, anthropocentric binaries, gamification’s genealogy is not found in the overcoming of the Eurocentric distinction between work and games, but in the algorithmic architecture of techno-capitalism.
... Gamification is defined as "the use of game design elements in non-game contexts" (Deterding et al., 2011). It is "a relatively new instrument in the orchestra of motivation" (Kotsopoulos et al., 2016) that can lead to behavioural change, break existing habits and update them with new ones by utilising positive emotional feedback and continuously setting appropriate stimuli (Blohm & Leimeister, 2013). Moreover, it can be used to increase employee participation, improve performance and compliance in specific goals (Seaborn & Fels, 2015), enhance employee satisfaction (Robson et al., 2015), as well as turn traditional organizational processes into fun, game-like, experiences (Robson et al., 2014), leading to behavioural change, increased and sustained employee motivation, engagement and productivity within an enterprise (Webb, 2013;Pickard, 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
Energy conservation in workplace environments is recognized as both important and impactful towards reducing worldwide CO2 emissions and protecting the environment. However, the focus of existing research has not primarily been on the employees' energy consumption behavior, albeit its potential impact on workplace energy efficiency. Aiming to affect employee energy behavior change towards more conscious consumption patterns, we have adopted gamification, a contemporary instrument that, when carefully utilized can lead to employee behavior change. Furthermore, we have followed an Iterative & Incremental Agile User Centered Design (UCD) approach towards designing a gamified IoT-enabled mobile app that provides energy consumption-related feedback to employees at their workplace. We present the characteristics of the designed app, as well as explain the rationale behind their choice. Usability results derived from employees in 3 workplaces at 3 different EU countries indicate that through our approach we designed a prototype gamified solution very well perceived and engaging to our target audience, scoring high in both usability, as well as user experience aspects. We further enhanced the app with additional functionality, according to the test users' feedback, towards producing the first integrated version. Initial results from testing this revised first integrated version of the app, revealed even more enhanced usability and user experience results, compared to the previous version. Overall, our derived evidence suggests that, by following an Iterative & Incremental Agile UCD approach within our field of application, we have derived a gamified app for energy-saving at the workplace that is conceived of as highly usable and provides for a positive user experience.
... Gamification, a relatively new instrument in the "orchestra of motivation" [54], has been suggested as a means of positive behavioral change in various contexts and for various targeted behaviors. However, its effectiveness lies subjected to the characteristics of both the specific application domain, as well as the participants' profiles. ...
Article
Full-text available
Gamification can be used to effect positive behavioral change in various fields, including energy conservation. This paper reports on a survey we conducted to formulate a holistic view of users’ profiles and preferences in an Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled gamified mobile application that provides personalized energy-saving recommendation tips to employees, towards conserving energy and adopting a more green behavior at the workplace. The collected insight dictates that a gamified app promoting energy saving at the workplace may become a daily habit for its users if it at least includes three game design elements: progression, levels and points. Additionally, we complement existing design guidelines about the requirements of each HEXAD gamification user type (Philanthropist, Socializer, Free Spirit, Achiever, Disruptor, Player) in game elements, specifically for energy efficiency applications. Thus, we apply and validate the HEXAD gamification user typology in a new context – multicultural workplaces – as well as domain – energy-saving. Moreover, the collected insight inspired us to devise a modular, rule-based mechanism for formulating personalized energy-saving recommendation tips tailored to the users’ profiles and game design choices. This research may assist researchers, as well as practitioners, in designing personalized gamified behavioral interventions, especially towards energy conservation in workplaces.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Availability of semantic-rich indoor floorplans; where places are labeled with their business names or categories; enables ubiquitous deployment of a wide range of indoor location-based services. In this paper, we present SemSense: a crowdsourcing-based system for automatic enrichment of indoor floorplans with semantic labels. SemSense exploits phone sensors data collected from users during their normal check-ins to location-based social networks (LBSNs) and combines them with data extracted from the LBSNs databases to associate a venue name with its location on an unlabeled floorplan. At the core of SemSense are different modules for handling incorrect location estimates, fake check-ins, as well as increasing the coverage of indoor venues by means of a novel category inference technique. Our experimental evaluation of SemSense using different Android phones in four malls in two cities shows that it can achieve a high semantic labeling accuracy of 87% using a relatively small number of check-ins at each venue in the presence of up to 50% erroneous check-ins. In addition, the proposed coverage extension technique leads to more than 27% enhancemen
Article
Full-text available
Gamification is an innovative approach to foster motivation. It refers to the use of game elements in non-game contexts. This article adopts a differentiated view on the topic of gamification and investigates, how and why different game elements can address different motivational mechanisms. At first, the concept of gamification and specific game elements characteristic of gamification are described. After that, different motivational perspectives were analyzed and motivational mechanisms in form of effect hypotheses were derived from these perspectives. To investigate the motivational pull of gamification, game elements are matched with motivational mechanisms. Our theoretical inquiry shows that gamification potentially addresses motivational mechanisms and thereby fosters motivation. These theoretical results can be used for the effective design of gamification environments and represent a basis for empirical research. Further research is required to confirm these theoretical findings.
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in how gamification—defined as the application of game design principles in non-gaming contexts—can be used in business. However, academic research and management practice have paid little attention to the challenges of how best to design, implement, manage, and optimize gamification strategies. To advance understanding of gamification, this article defines what it is and explains how it prompts managers to think about business practice in new and innovative ways. Drawing upon the game design literature, we present a framework of three gamification principles—mechanics, dynamics, and emotions (MDE)—to explain how gamified experiences can be created. We then provide an extended illustration of gamification and conclude with ideas for future research and application opportunities.
Article
Full-text available
Many students play (computer) games in their leisure time, thus acquiring skills which can easily be utilized when it comes to teaching more sophisticated knowledge. Nevertheless many educators today are wasting this opportunity. Some have evaluated gaming scenarios and methods for teaching students and have created the term "gamification". This paper describes the history of this new term and explains the possible impact on teaching. It will take well-researched facts into consideration to discuss the potential of games. Moreover, scenarios will be illustrated and evaluated for educatorsto adopt and use on their own.
Book
Full-text available
This book explains how gamification, specifically enterprise gamification, can help managers in multiple areas within an enterprise to improve attrition. Employee Engagement is an important component to foster employee relations with the organization. Gamification by its inherent design helps to increase engagement within an enterprise. Several successful case studies in Gamification are presented, which present new practical tips for Gamification for IT Management. By introducing general IT management concepts related to the specific environment managers work in, the authors then detail the benefits of introducing gamification in this very environment to resolve business issues. IT Managers, as well as HR professionals, Group Heads, and Delivery Leaders will find this be a useful resource to understand how Gamification can improve their everyday work. The book can also be used as a reference for engaging learners and employees to improve their productivity in organizations.
Article
Full-text available
Gamification is about understanding and influencing human behaviours that organizations want to encourage amongst their workforce or customers. Gamification seeks to take enjoyable aspects of games – fun, play and challenge – and apply them to real-world business processes. Analysts are predicting massive growth of gamification over the next few years, but is there any substance to the benefits being touted? This article takes a critical look at the potential of gamification as a business change agent that can deliver a more motivated and engaged workforce.
Article
Full-text available
Gamification has drawn the attention of academics, practitioners and business professionals in domains as diverse as education, information studies, human-computer interaction, and health. As yet, the term remains mired in diverse meanings and contradictory uses, while the concept faces division on its academic worth, underdeveloped theoretical foundations, and a dearth of standardized guidelines for application. Despite widespread commentary on its merits and shortcomings, little empirical work has sought to validate gamification as a meaningful concept and provide evidence of its effectiveness as a tool for motivating and engaging users in non-entertainment contexts. Moreover, no work to date has surveyed gamification as a field of study from a human-computer studies perspective. In this paper, we present a systematic survey on the use of gamification in published theoretical reviews and research papers involving interactive systems and human participants. We outline current theoretical understandings of gamification and draw comparisons to related approaches, including alternate reality games (ARGs), games with a purpose (GWAPs), and gameful design. We present a multidisciplinary review of gamification in action, focusing on empirical findings related to purpose and context, design of systems, approaches and techniques, and user impact. Findings from the survey show that a standard conceptualization of gamification is emerging against a growing backdrop of empirical participants-based research. However, definitional subjectivity, diverse or unstated theoretical foundations, incongruities among empirical findings, and inadequate experimental design remain matters of concern. We discuss how gamification may to be more usefully presented as a subset of a larger effort to improve the user experience of interactive systems through gameful design. We end by suggesting points of departure for continued empirical investigations of gamified practice and its effects.
Article
Full-text available
Humans have a potential for growth, integration, and well-being, while also being vulnerable to defensiveness, aggression, and ill-being. Self-determination theory (R. M. Ryan & E. L. Deci, 2000, Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development and well-being, American Psychologist, Vol. 55, pp. 68–78) argues that satisfaction of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness both fosters immediate well-being and strengthens inner resources contributing to subsequent resilience, whereas need frustration evokes ill-being and increased vulnerabilities for defensiveness and psychopathology. We briefly review recent research indicating how contextual need support and the experience of need satisfaction promote well-being and different growth manifestations (e.g., intrinsic motivation, internalization), as well as a rapidly growing body of work relating need thwarting and need frustration to ill-being, pursuit of need substitutes, and various forms of maladaptive functioning. Finally, we discuss research on differences in autonomous self-regulation and mindfulness, which serve as factors of resilience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)
Technical Report
Full-text available
Location sharing systems often entail concerns about privacy when disclosing one’s position.Users worry that their location could be traced by people they do not know sufficiently well – a side effect of large friend lists in social networks. Earlier research observed large-scale networks such as Foursquare or Google Latitude. In this work, we investigate how a spatially limited location sharing system affects check-in habits. We evaluated our work in a two-week explorative field study with an on-campus location sharing system, Ubiversity, we imple- mented for that purpose. Our results indicate that from a pri- vacy point of view, users tend to disclose more willingly their location if it is limited to a local area, even those who refrain from using large location sharing systems like Foursquare. We also found that reasons for disclosing one’s location in a local context are different from those in large social networks. The smaller spatial distances of check-ins simplify sponta- neous meet-ups with friends and are a motivational factor for location sharing.
Article
Full-text available
NikeFuel is the fuel of the Nike+ community. A fuel that has made two million users burn more than 68 bn. calories and that proliferates with each kilometer. The athletic performance of Nike+ users is measured via sensors in Nike sports shoes and an Apple iPod or iPhone, documented on the Nike+platform and converted into NikeFuel. In doing so, users may visualize their progress, compare their performance with others, and obtain different status levels that reflect their athletic potential. This approach derives from the domain of game design and is called gamification enriching products, services, and information systems with game-design elements in order to positively influence motivation, productivity, and behavior of users. In the consumer sector, various successful examples for gamication are gaining recognition. Gamication is a persuasive technology that attempts to influence user behavior by activating individual motives via game-design elements. As a consequence, this approach does not deal with designing games that can generally be defined as solving rule-based artificial conflicts or simulations. Thus, gamication needs to be contrasted to related concepts such as serious games and games with a purpose.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The development of multiple web applications with features of video games gave way to a new trend called Gamification. However, there isn't a clear explanation that allows the connection of the elements of the game applications with non-game features, mainly in traditional highly regulated financial sector. The aim of this study is to investigate the acceptance of a business application Gamified in e-banking. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), the results from an online survey of 183 customers show that the Gamified application had a positive impact on the acceptance of this new concept in e-banking. Our findings show that perceived ease-of-use have a strong positive influence on costumers intentions and on the perceived usefulness. Further analysis and model modification show that perceived usefulness and enjoyment have positive influence on perceived ease-of-use. The results also show that the customers have accepted and used the Gamified application to manage their investments and bought more mutual funds thus increasing the chance to win the game.
Article
Full-text available
Gamified workplaces could be a positive and innovative solution to addressing contemporary problems in organizations. Such problems include high levels of stress, reduced sense of community, reduced loyalty and rapid changes in the workforce. To better prepare organizations for the future it may be helpful to identify and understand the potential advantages, disadvantages and areas for future research in relationship to the use of gamification for personal and organizational wellbeing. An analysis of research literature across disciplines in combination with expert opinion identified gamified workplaces as a promising strategy for promoting wellbeing. Furthermore, this paper proposes a set of 10 principles (I PLAY AT WORK) that may support gamification efforts. In addition to the value of mapping the present for the benefit of the future, there is also considerable value in reshaping core ideas related to the workplaces. Gamified workplaces can provide opportunities for a more vigorous and strategic inter-disciplinary research agenda that can stimulate investments in the area.
Article
Full-text available
In recent years there has been a growing interest in the use of multimedia mobile guides in museum environments. Mobile devices have the capabilities to detect the user context and to provide pieces of information suitable to help visitors discover and follow the logical and emotional connections that develop during the visit. In this scenario, location based services (LBS) currently represent an asset, and the choice of the technology to determine users' position, combined with the definition of methods that can effectively convey information, become key issues in the design process. In this work, we present Museum Assistant (MusA), a general framework for the development of multimedia interactive guides for mobile devices. Its main feature is a vision-based indoor positioning system that allows the provision of several LBS, from way-finding to the contextualized communication of cultural contents, aimed at providing a meaningful exploration of exhibits according to visitors' personal interest and curiosity. Starting from the thorough description of the system architecture, the article presents the implementation of two mobile guides, developed to respectively address adults and children, and discusses the evaluation of the user experience and the visitors' appreciation of these applications.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gamified services delivered on smart phones, such as Foursquare, are able to utilise the sensors on the phone to capture user contexts as a means of triggering game elements. This paper identifies and discusses opportunities and challenges that exist when using mobile sensors as input for game elements. We present initial findings from a field study of a gamified mobile application made to support the university orientation event for new students using game achievements. The study showed that overall the use of context was well received by participants when compared to game elements that required no context to complete. It was also found that using context could help validate that an activity was completed however there were still technical challenges when using sensors that led to exploits in the game elements, or cheating.
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive evaluation theory, which explains the effects of extrinsic motivators on intrinsic motivation, received some initial attention in the organizational literature. However, the simple dichotomy between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation made the theory difficult to apply to work settings. Differentiating extrinsic motivation into types that differ in their degree of autonomy led to self-determination theory, which has received widespread attention in the education, health care, and sport domains. This article describes self-determination theory as a theory of work motivation and shows its relevance to theories of organizational behavior. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
Full-text available
Four studies apply self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000) in investigating motivation for computer game play, and the effects of game play on well-being. Studies 1–3 examine individuals playing 1, 2 and 4 games, respectively and show that perceived in-game autonomy and competence are associated with game enjoyment, preferences, and changes in well-being pre- to post-play. Competence and autonomy perceptions are also related to the intuitive nature of game controls, and the sense of presence or immersion in participants’ game play experiences. Study 4 surveys an on-line community with experience in multi-player games. Results show that SDT’s theorized needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness independently predict enjoyment and future game play. The SDT model is also compared with Yee’s (2005) motivation taxonomy of game play motivations. Results are discussed in terms of the relatively unexplored landscape of human motivation within virtual worlds.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
"Gamification" is an informal umbrella term for the use of video game elements in non-gaming systems to improve user experience (UX) and user engagement. The recent introduction of 'gamified' applications to large audiences promises new additions to the existing rich and diverse research on the heuristics, design patterns and dynamics of games and the positive UX they provide. However, what is lacking for a next step forward is the integration of this precise diversity of research endeavors. Therefore, this workshop brings together practitioners and researchers to develop a shared understanding of existing approaches and findings around the gamification of information systems, and identify key synergies, opportunities, and questions for future research.
Book
For the seventh consecutive year, the AGILE promotes the publication of a book collecting high-level scientific papers from unpublished fundamental scientific research in the field of Geographic Information Science. As the agenda for Europe 2020 is currently being set, this book demonstrates how geographic information science is at the heart of Europe. The contributions open perspectives for innovative services that will strengthen our European economy, and which will inform citizens about their environment while preserving their privacy. The latest challenges of spatial data infrastructures are addressed, such as the connection with the Web vocabularies or the representation of genealogy. User generated data (through social networks or through interactive cameras and software) is also an important breakthrough in our domain. A trend to deal more and more with time, events, ancient data, a nd activities is noticeable this year as well. This volume collects the 23 best full papers presented during the 16th AGILE Conference on Geographic Information Science, held between 14 and 17 May 2013 in Leuven, Belgium.
Book
Millions play Farmville, Scrabble, and countless other games, generating billions in sales each year. The careful and skillful construction of these games is built on decades of research into human motivation and psychology: A well-designed game goes right to the motivational heart of the human psyche. In For the Win, Kevin Werbach and Dan Hunter argue persuasively that game-makers need not be the only ones benefiting from game design. Werbach and Hunter, lawyers and World of Warcraft players, created the world's first course on gamification at the Wharton School. In their book, they reveal how game thinking--addressing problems like a game designer--can motivate employees and customers and create engaging experiences that can transform your business. For the Win reveals how a wide range of companies are successfully using game thinking. It also offers an explanation of when gamifying makes the most sense and a 6-step framework for using games for marketing, productivity enhancement, innovation, employee motivation, customer engagement, and more.
Conference Paper
A number of commentators have proposed adapting elements derived from game mechanics to workplaces, to motivate employees via techniques that, the argument goes, have proven successful in a videogame context, and thus may have wider motivational applications. This general strategy has become grouped under the term "gamification". I argue the gamification-of-work movement has at least two major precursors, one in the Soviet Union of the early to mid 20th century, and another in American management of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The Soviet approach focused on games to increase productivity, via experiments ranging from purely competitive games directly tied to productivity, to attempts at morale-building via team games and workplace self-expression. The American management approach focused more strongly on a sense of childhood play, aiming to weaken the work/play split, but often with games and competition integrated into the framework. Neither approach is identical to the gamification-of-work movement, but there exist significant overlaps, and thus both the historical movements themselves, and the critiques that have been directed at them, should be studied in order to better understand how to approach current attempts in light of past experiences.
Article
The higher costs of energy have increased organizations' interest in searching for ways to reduce energy use. Typically, organizations have utilized structural or operational changes to decrease their energy use. Another approach involves the energy-conservation behaviors of an organization's employees. Drawing on value-belief-norm theory (Stern, 2000b), we examined the individual-level factors related to energy-conservation behaviors at work among employees of a large state university. Using path analysis, we found that environmental personal norms predicted self-reported energy-conservation behaviors, as well as behavioral intentions. Environmental personal norms also mediated the relationship of environmental worldviews with self-reported energy-conservation behaviors, as well as behavioral intentions. Implications for theory and organizational energy-conservation interventions are discussed.
Article
Self-control theories have focused on various aspects of the processes involved in exerting self-control. In the present paper, we intend to add to this literature by demonstrating that exerting self-control leads one to narrow one's attention and cognition, inducing a narrow mindset. We demonstrate this in three studies. Participants who exerted self-control applied a narrower view (Study 1), applied a narrower categorization (Study 2), and used more concrete language (Study 3) than participants who did not exert self-control. Results are discussed in light of the possibility that a narrow mindset enhances performance on the self-control task at hand at the cost of poorer performance on other tasks.
Connecting Gamification and Motivation Theory
  • Ashridge
Ashridge, 2014. Connecting Gamification and Motivation Theory. Virtual Ashridge @ The HR director, pp.1-5. Available at: https://www.thehrdirector.com/features/gamification/connectinggamification-and-motivation-theory/ [Accessed January 25, 2016].
More resources Munzee adds NFC to geolocation game
  • M Clark
Clark, M., 2012. More resources Munzee adds NFC to geolocation game. NFC World, (5 September), pp.8-9. Available at: http://www.nfcworld.com/2012/09/05/317625/munzee-adds-nfc-togeolocation-game/ [Accessed January 19, 2016].
Examples of Gamification in the Workplace
  • Concur
Concur, 2014. 3 Examples of Gamification in the Workplace. Concur Blog, pp.1-5. Available at: https://www.concur.com/blog/en-us/3-examples-of-gamification-in-the-workplace [Accessed February 27, 2016].
Playing in Taskville : Designing a Social Game for the Workplace
  • S Nikkila
Nikkila, S. et al., 2011. Playing in Taskville : Designing a Social Game for the Workplace. CHI 2011 Workshop on Gamification: Using Game Design Elements in Non-Game Contexts, pp.1-4.
Gamification in Education and Business T
  • T Reiners
  • L C Wood
Reiners, T. & Wood, L.C., 2015. Gamification in Education and Business T. Reiners & L. C. Wood, eds., Cham: Springer International Publishing. Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-10208-5.
Studying Gamification: The Effect of Rewards and Incentives on Motivation
  • G Richter
  • D R Raban
  • S Rafaeli
Richter, G., Raban, D.R. & Rafaeli, S., 2015. Studying Gamification: The Effect of Rewards and Incentives on Motivation. In Gamification in Education and Business. Cham: Springer International Publishing, pp. 21-46. Available at: http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/recipepreprint.pdf\nhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-10208-5.
Start the Game: Increasing User Experience of Enterprise Systems Following a Gamification Mechanism
  • M Schacht
  • S Schacht
Schacht, M. & Schacht, S., 2012. Start the Game: Increasing User Experience of Enterprise Systems Following a Gamification Mechanism. In Software for People, Management for Professionals. pp. 181-199. Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-642-31371-4.
Adam Penenberg: How Gamification Is Going To Change The Workplace. Forbes
  • D Schawbel
Schawbel, D., 2013. Adam Penenberg: How Gamification Is Going To Change The Workplace. Forbes, pp.1-7. Available at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/danschawbel/2013/10/07/adampenenberg-how-gamification-is-going-to-change-the-workplace/.
Gamification for spatial literacy : The use of a desktop application to foster map-based competencies
  • A Schwering
Schwering, A. et al., 2014. Gamification for spatial literacy : The use of a desktop application to foster map-based competencies. In AGILE 2014. Castellon.
Towards a code of ethics for gamification at enterprise
  • A Shahri
Shahri, A. et al., 2014. Towards a code of ethics for gamification at enterprise. Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, 197, pp.235-245.
Using Gamification in Reward and Recognition to improve Employee Engagement
SODEXO, 2016. Using Gamification in Reward and Recognition to improve Employee Engagement, Available at: http://whitepapers.sodexomotivation.com/wpcontent/uploads/2015/03/Gamification-in-Recognition.pdf.
AIRCacher: virtual geocaching powered with augmented reality
  • G Tursi
  • M Deplano
  • G Ruffo
Tursi, G., Deplano, M. & Ruffo, G., 2014. AIRCacher: virtual geocaching powered with augmented reality. Proceedings of the Conference on Hypertext and social media, pp.330-332.
Smart Gamification and Smart Serious Games
  • A Uskov
  • B Sekar
Uskov, A. & Sekar, B., 2015. Smart Gamification and Smart Serious Games. In Fusion of Smart, Multimedia and Computer Gaming Technology: Research, Systems and Perspectives. Springer International Publishing, pp. 7-36. Available at: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-14645-4_7\nhttps://www.academia.edu/11124916/3D_Virtual_Worlds_as_a_Fusion_of_Immersing_Vi sualizing_Recording_and_Replaying_Technologies.
Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All: The Way to Health at Work. Recommendation of the Second Meeting of the WHO Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health 11-14
WHO, 1995. Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All: The Way to Health at Work. Recommendation of the Second Meeting of the WHO Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health 11-14 October 1994 Beijing, China, pp.1-23. Available at: http://www.who.int/occupational_health/globstrategy/en/.
Kort Game. OpenStreetmap_wiki
  • Openstreetmap
  • Org
OpenStreetmap.org, 2014. Kort Game. OpenStreetmap_wiki. Available at: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Kort_Game [Accessed January 20, 2016].