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Careful cross-disciplinary investigation of ancient DNA samples recently published supports a demic diffusion model for the expansion of Indo-European-speaking peoples from Yamna directly into central and western Europe through the Bell Beaker culture, challenging previous archaeological and linguistic theories based on the expansion through the Corded Ware culture. Potential consequences of this new model in archaeological and linguistic investigation are outlined in this paper, among them the development of a stable framework of time and space for Indo-European dialectal classification, allowing for a more precise dating of Indo-European branches and their splits and expansions, and why and how they might have occurred.
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... 2500 BC. This group expanded successfully in a short period into wide territories of western, northern, and eastern Europe, territories whose languages later evolved into Celtic, Italic, and Germanic, and probably Balto-Slavic (or its substrate language, 'Temematic'), thus allowing for certain innovations to spread between these languages (Harrison and Heyd 2007;Mallory 2013;Quiles 2017). ...
... This linguistic scheme is compatible with the spread of the Repin culture ca. 3300 BC westward into the north Pontic steppe, and eastward as a group that would develop the language ancestral to Tocharian (Anthony 2007;Quiles 2017). The time to most recent ancestor of eastern Yamna lineages show that Palaeo-Balkan and Pre-Indo-Iranian groups were already developed in this common early Yamna stage, in the late Khvalynsk culture, while the common western European lineages had yet to split. ...
... Much information is available about male ancestry through the study of the male-inherited Y chromosome. There are four Y-chromosomal haplogroups in Europe (Quiles, 2017). R1a, R1b and I are predominant in Western (R1b), Eastern (R1a) and Northern (I) Europe, but haplogroup HG-N is the predominant Y-chromosomal haplogroup in Europe's north-eastern segment. ...
... Y contamos ya con una tesis doctoral leída en una universidad española que se ha preocupado por conjugar los datos genéticos, arqueológicos y lingüísticos para confeccionar un modelo interpretativo más sobre la expansión de las lenguas indoeuropeas: no la firmó un doctorando de Prehistoria o Arqueología, sino ¡de Medicina! (Quiles, 2017). ¿Para cuándo una síntesis firmada por un arqueólogo que intente digerir el registro genético? ...
... This rate of change is currently difficult to be assessed, because the history of world exchanges is not long after all. At present, it is generally believed that the Indo-European language family [9][10] is derived from a so-called "Proto-Indo-European ", subgroupings: Germanic languages, Romance languages, Celtic group and so on. ...
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