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Abstract

This study investigates rainfall and temperature variabilities in Nigeria using observations of air temperature (oC) and rainfall (mm) from 25 synoptic stations from 1971-2000 (30years). The data were analyzed for the occurrences of abrupt changes in temperature and rainfall values over Nigeria while temporal and spatial trends were also investigated. Statistical approach was deployed to determine the confidence levels, coefficients of kurtosis, skewness and coefficient of variations. Analysis of air temperature indicated that in the first decade of 1971- 1980 anomalies between -0.2 and -1.6 were predominant, in the second decade of 1981-1990, only five stations (Lokoja, Kaduna, Bida, Bauchi and Warri) shows positive anomaly while greater portion of the country were normal with evidence of warming in the third decade of 1991-2000. Results further indicated that there have been statistically significant increases in precipitation and air temperature in vast majority of the country. Analyses of long time trends and decadal trends in the time series further suggest a sequence of alternately decreasing and increasing trends in mean annual precipitation and air temperature in Nigeria during the study period.
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... African temperature statistical analysis series between 1979 and 2010 reveals significant upward trends across Africa (Collins 2011). It also examines temperature changes over time, detecting abrupt changes in the data series and revealing statistically significant changes in the analysed variable, such as increasing temperature values (Akinsanola and Ogunjobi 2014) (Akinsanola and Ogunjobi 2014). ...
... African temperature statistical analysis series between 1979 and 2010 reveals significant upward trends across Africa (Collins 2011). It also examines temperature changes over time, detecting abrupt changes in the data series and revealing statistically significant changes in the analysed variable, such as increasing temperature values (Akinsanola and Ogunjobi 2014) (Akinsanola and Ogunjobi 2014). ...
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... The city of Abuja experiences double of thunderstorm [9]. The Tropical continental air mass iscold, dusty and dry due to its Saharan origin while the Tropical maritime air mass is often warm and moist because it originate from Atlantic Ocean [10]. Abuja is made up of six (6) Area council's which includes; Abuja municipal, Abaji, Bwari, Gwagwalada, Kuje and Kwali. ...
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... The area is located in the tropical region of Nigeria with two discrete seasons. The minimum and maximum diurnal temperature varies between 15 • C and 35 • C with an average difference of 20 • C in temperature in about thirty years (Akinsanola and Ogunjobi, 2014;Ogunsola and Yaya, 2019). The relative humidity of the area ranges from 39% to 98% (Akinbode et al., 2008) while the annual rainfall ranges between 150 mm and 3000 mm. ...
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