Article

Legitimate peripheral participation in communities of practice

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Previous research [1] shows that WBL are likely to be a member of a work-based Community of Practice within their workplace prior to becoming a Graduate Apprentice. Community of Practices (CoP) are "groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly" [2]. Building an additional CoP within RGU was recognised as an important objective to allow these apprentices to benefit from peer interactions with others working towards the same qualification. ...
... These on-campus days facilitated peer interactions and encouraged the development of a supportive learning environment which proved beneficial to encourage engagement and promote support whilst allowing the students to build meaningful relationships with one another. As Vygotsky theorises, the creation of a supportive learning community would further enhance the students learning experience and provide access to more experienced and capable learners [2]. ...
Conference Paper
Graduate Apprenticeships look to overcome the segregation of learning and working by integrating traditional education into the context of the work environment. This poster looks to highlight the importance of peer interactions, specifically for Online Distance Learners and how Robert Gordon University has implemented this within its GA programmes through on-campus days.
... However, they teach a limited group of students, and their practice does not offer interaction with special education needs (SEN) students regularly. Pre-service teachers are legitimate peripheral participants in communities of practice, meaning they are becoming experienced members (Lave & Wenger, 2001). If the community of practice consists of teacher educators teaching about inclusive education for all, who themselves are peripheral participants, this affects the teacher students' possibilities to develop. ...
... Professional development courses and seminars are offered at University B and the results show that University B teacher educators are more satisfied with their professional development than University A teacher educators, where no such training is offered. This might be one important aspect for creating a community of practice and enhance the teacher educators' situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 2001). Murrey, Flannery, and Wren (2008) found in their research a need for more professional development for higher education teachers to support students with disabilities, in line with the findings of the research presented in this article. ...
Article
Full-text available
This research explores teacher educators’ self-reported preparedness to teach students with special educational needs. Teacher educators are concerned with preparing the next generation of teachers who will, in turn, be addressing the needs of students with special educational needs within schools. Being able to address this important task also in their own teaching at the teacher education program is important for their own credibility. In total, 104 teacher educators at two university faculties completed an online questionnaire with questions about teaching students with special education needs. The results showed a significant difference between the educators’ self-reported professional development needs. At University B, educators rated their own competence as well as the organizational ability to meet students with special educational needs higher than educators at University A, regardless of disability. One explanation for the differences in self-rated competence might be due to the mandatory courses about how to teach students with special educational needs, shaping a community of practice with a shared knowledge among the teacher educators at University B. However, the experienced challenge lies in difficulties to transform the knowledge of what is required and expected into practical solutions for teaching students with special educational needs. Keywords: disability research, inclusive teaching, professional development, special educational needs, teacher education.
... Lave and Wenger [31] stated that CoPs are characterized by a shared domain of interest, joint community activities, and a shared domain of practice. CoPs act as knowledge stewarding communities where members can organize and manage a body of knowledge from which they draw professional learning to improve their practice. ...
Article
Full-text available
Instructional design and technology (IDT) professionals participate in communities of practice (CoPs) on Facebook to seek pedagogical and educational technology advice for solving instructional design (ID) problems. Much of the IDT literature has focused on formal educational environments and not on nonformal settings outside the classroom and beyond formal education. Further analysis of tacit or practical knowledge exchanged among community members is required to understand the purpose, functions, and organizational knowledge capital in online CoPs. To fill this gap, this study uses natural language processing (NLP) to analyze the practical knowledge of 6,066 anonymized users’ posts from four large public IDT CoPs on Facebook from September 2017 to September 2020 after cleaning the dataset. User posts were publicly available and required no password authentication for access, including Instructional Designer (4,717), Designers for Learning (228), Adobe Captivate Users (599), and Articulate Storyline (522). The proposed methodology aims to extract practical knowledge of individual online CoPs in three parts. First, the characteristics of written communication among members are extracted by calculating word and sentence lengths, word frequencies, and contiguous words. Second, the characteristics of members’ exchange of practical knowledge are obtained through sentiment identification, entity recognition, and relationships between pedagogical and educational technology entities. Third, the functions of individual online CoPs are developed through topic modeling with latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) and BERTopic. The findings suggest similarities and differences among IDT CoPs, different resource distribution conventions, and members exchanging pedagogical and educational technology advice. The study highlights the need for pedagogical foundations to support instructional and technical decisions, mechanisms for self-assessment of practical knowledge concerning IDT competencies, community protocols for addressing misconceptions about learning, onboarding materials for new members, and new topic structures to classify practical knowledge. NLP tasks are implemented using Python libraries to support the future development of awareness tools.
... For example Cremin (1988: x) recognizes education as " the deliberate, systematic and sustained effort to transmit, evoke, or acquire knowledge, values, attitudes, skills and sensibilities, as well as any learning that results from that effort, direct or indirect, intended or unintended. " This definition reformulates education from a one-way, transmission process solely concerned about the acquisition of facts (Sawyer, 2006; Silberman, 1970) to a powerful conceptualization that provides for learning to take place (or not) when one is specifically intending to " teach " or " learn " as well as when no one intends to be teaching or learning (Lave and Wenger, 1999; Rogoff et al., 2003). Likewise, included in this definition of education are the domains of morals, ethics, attitudes, dispositions, and abilities to successfully operate within society (cf. ...
Article
Full-text available
While theoretical work and empirical research have examined science policyinforming “dialogue events,” dialogue events that do not seek to inform public policy are under-theorized and under-researched, even though they are common and growing in popularity in the UK. We describe how, from a critical perspective, it may initially appear that such events cannot be justified without returning to the deficit model. But with this paper, we seek to open up a discussion about these non policy-informing events by arguing that there are in fact further ways to understand and frame them. We deliberately draw on different literatures and seek to make use of practitioner expertise within our discussion, in order to display several perspectives on the value of non-policy dialogue on science as sites of symmetrical individual or small-scale learning—rather than institutional learning—through social processes.
... A knowledge building community can be illustrated by a committed scientist community where the members jointly identify authentic problems and assume collective responsibilities to advance their understanding and theories (Hewitt, 2001; Scardamalia, 2002). Unlike other communities of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1999), the primary goal of a knowledge building community is to advance knowledge rather than to merely solve problems. This is similar to a " knowledge creating company " that focuses on idea improvement as the core activity of the whole organization (Bereiter & Scardamalia, 2006). ...
Article
In recent years, there have been many exchanges of perspectives and debates in the field of conceptual change. Most of the classical views on conceptual change have been criticized, and there have been recent discussions around bridging the cognitive and socio-cultural approaches in the research on conceptual change. On the other hand, researchers and educators in the knowledge building communities have been working towards advancing the frontier of knowledge work and knowledge creation in education in order to cope with the challenges of an emerging knowledge society. In this paper, we examine some of the main principles of knowledge building in relation to fostering conceptual change with reference to specific examples. Specifically, we highlight the foundational goal of knowledge building with respect to conceptual change.
... As Lave and Wenger (2001) argued identity is inseparable from issues of practice, community, and meaning. The collective identity uniting the ACT CoP members was extant in learning and sharing the practice and technicalities of GEP implementation, institutional change, gender knowledge, and strategies against resistance to gender equality. ...
Book
Full-text available
Bringing together the latest research among various communities of practice (disciplinary and place based, as well as thematically organised), this volume reflects upon the knowledge, experience and practice gained through taking a unique community of practice approach to fostering gender equality in the sectors of research and innovation, and higher education in Europe and beyond. Based on research funded by the European Union, it considers how inter-organisational collaboration can foster change for gender equality through sharing of experiences of Gender Equality Plan implementation and examining the role of measures such as change-monitoring systems. As such, it will appeal to social scientists with interests in organisational change, the sociology of work and gender equality.
... Understanding the expectations of interns in achieving expected competencies and the role of assessment towards these ends, needs to be defined and evaluated in the SA context. The discrepant perceptions among supervisors and interns of the same LE indicates a need to improve our understanding of the 'community of practice' (COP) within the internship setting [51]. Further research and more qualitative insight into this 'community of practice' during internship will likely improve our understanding and is required especially in high disease burdened and resource constrained contexts. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background South African (SA) paediatric interns (recently qualified medical graduates) work in a high disease burdened and resource deficient environment for two years, prior to independent practice. Perceptions of this learning environment (LE) influences their approaches to training as well as the outcomes of this period of development. Obstacles to creating a supportive LE and supervisor interaction affects the quality of this training. Measuring perceptions of the LE with validated instruments can help inform improvements in learning during this crucial period of medical education. Methods The aims of this study was to determine the psychometric qualities of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) amongst paediatric interns across four hospital complexes in South Africa and to measure the LE as perceived by both interns and their supervisors. Construct validity was tested using factor analysis and internal consistency was measured with Cronbach’s alpha. Results A total of 209 interns and 60 supervisors (69% intern response rate) responded to the questionnaire. The PHEEM was found to be very reliable with an overall Cronbach’s alpha of 0.943 and 0.874 for intern and supervisors respectively. Factor analysis using a 3-factor solution accounted for 42% of the variance with the teaching subscale having the best fit compared with the other sub-scales of the original tool. Most interns perceived the learning environment as being more positive than negative however, their perceptions differed significantly from that of their supervisors. Poor infrastructural support from institutions, excessive workloads and inadequate supervision were factors preventing optimal training of paediatric interns. Conclusions The SA version of the PHEEM tool used was found to be a reliable and valid instrument for use in interns amongst high disease burdened contexts. Various obstacles to creating an ideal learning environment for paediatric interns were identified to be in need of urgent review. Key differences in perceptions of an ideal learning environment between interns and their supervisors need to be fully explored as these may result in sub-optimal supervision and mentoring. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1186/s12909-017-1080-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
... This conception of the relationship between the two roles suggests that knowledge contributors are active entities and knowledge seekers are passive entities in the knowledge management system development; the way knowledge is modeled within the system is unknown to the knowledge seeker, who is not responsible for its modification or maintenance. Indeed, this is a big limitation to the CoP potentialities in developing knowledge models: in particular, the principle of legitimate peripheral participation (LPP) (Lave and Wenger, 2002) is not satisfied. LPP consists in the possibility for newcomers to enter the CoP actively, contributing to its growth by means of their competencies. ...
Article
Full-text available
A framework for cultivating virtual communities of practice in distributed environments is presented. The framework is based on the integration of knowledge artifacts and wearable technologies. Design/Methodology approach The proposed knowledge artifact is based on the correlation between conceptual an computational tools for the representation of different kinds of knowledge. In this way, it is possible to make deeper the collaboration between knowledge seekers and contributors within the community, given that seekers and contributors share, at least in part, design choices at the knowledge modeling level.
Article
The past decade has seen multiple debates and discussions over the appropriate framing of Nature of Science (NOS) for science education. These debates have stemmed from a diversity of philosophical views on what science fundamentally is. In post-secondary STEM education, the goals of a science education rest in having students socialize into scientific STEM communities by engaging in research. In this paper, we highlight how NOS is taken up by individuals within scientific communities, drawing on historical and concurrent examples of STEM communities. Terming this the Nature of Scientist (NOSist), we argue that a post-secondary NOS education must take into account how the individual’s participation within a community of practice is predicated on the possession of a different set of epistemic aims, values, and practices than what is typically characterized within NOS frameworks. The switch in analytical lens from the collective as a whole to the individual within a collective contributes to an understanding of how scientists function within scientific communities. We conclude with recommendations and a call for further studies to characterize how individual scientists negotiate practice within the dialectic of the scientific communities that they are members of.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During a 10 weeks course, an Enterprise Social Network (ESN) was used by 45 students in higher education to limit the use of e-mail and facilitate knowledge sharing and collaboration among the students. Research performed by the students shows that the use of an ESN can be of added value to higher education as it is adopted quickly and it makes knowledge sharing more easy.
Chapter
This chapter seeks to provide insights into how Singapore policy makers enable and empower teachers to support students with diverse needs such as autism spectrum disorder through national plans and education provisions. To the Ministry of Education, prioritising teacher professional development in inclusive/special education and root it in enquiry collaborative learning is key. Supporting teachers throughout their career to plan, develop and implement a quality and inclusive curricula to empower students to live, learn and work in the twenty-first century is another priority. Of significance in our nation’s drive towards inclusive/special education was launching the third Enabling Masterplan (2017–2021) that chart policy directions to address gaps in resources towards better integrating persons with special needs in a holistic way and across the sectors. A key recommendation in the Masterplan is ensuring accessibility to quality special education for every child through the Compulsory Education Act (2009). Therefore, teachers should be equipped with the skills to be able to support students with diverse needs. The preparation of teachers for inclusive/special education to improve learning outcomes of students with ASD in Singapore is discussed. The professional development models that are used effectively to improve teacher collaboration within autism practice will also be examined.
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in information retrieval, data storage, knowledge capture, ontology modelling and semantic web have been significant to internet applications. The web-based community is an internet application with a growing interest to research in various disciplines. With the technology it has, the community boundary is boundless and mutual participation is enabled. Liberalisation in communication has to take place, as it is an important component in synergising the flow of the knowledge circle within the community and the web. The community plays the role of shaping the specific needs of knowledge throughout its organisation such that the communication in expressing intellectual feedback to the system as a process of sharing knowledge will occur. However, the literature has shown that communication enthusiasm and aggressiveness differ among communities by their ethnography and culture. The paper describes the main factors which impede liberalisation in communication among communities in the context of knowledge sharing. As a solution to these problems, communicative social intelligence built on three main technological concepts and how it solves the communication impediments that exist among communities on the web are discussed.
Article
This article is concerned with the application of sociological analysis to the development of a 16‐19 curriculum of the future. It begins by clarifying the concept of the curriculum with particular reference to the 16‐19 phase of education. It then presents a brief analysis of recent developments in 16‐19 education in England and Wales and highlights the issues that these developments have raised. The final section of the paper draws on a sociological approach to knowledge and learning to suggest how these issues might be addressed by curriculum policy makers. The article concludes by proposing a model of the 16‐19 curriculum of the future based on the idea of ‘connective specialisation’.[1] This paper is a slightly revised text of a Professorial Lecture given at the Institute of Education, University of London on 4 February 1999 and first published by the Institute of Education in April 1999.
Article
The community of practice (CoP) concept has grown in popularity, yet remains under-studied. In particular, we have not developed a sufficient understanding of the individual outcomes associated with CoP engagement. This paper offers a fresh research model that identifies three practice-based concepts described in the CoP literature—shared repertoire, joint enterprise, and mutual engagement—and links them to individual learning outcomes. Survey measures are developed using a card sorting procedure, a research model is pilot tested using survey data collected from 53 graduate students in a large Canadian university, and then the model is field-tested using interview and survey data collected from 59 employees in a non-profit organization. The paper offers a new set of distinct CoP measures, and examines how they are associated with learning. A discussion of practical implications and future research directions is provided.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the problematics of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings. The paper specifically explores learning processes that emerge, when a new knowledge domain is introduced into an existing organizational practice with the aim of creating a new combined practice. Design/methodology/approach – A case study was carried out as a “natural experiment” in an engineering consultancy, where emerging initiatives to integrate the newly acquired competencies into the existing practice were explored. A theoretical framework informed by selected perspectives on learning processes and boundary processes was applied on three illustrative vignettes to illuminate learning potentials and shortcomings in boundary processes. Findings – In the engineering consultancy, it was found that while learning did occur in the consultancy organization, it remained discrete in ‘pockets’ of learning; mainly at an individual level, at project level or as domain-specific learning. Learning processes were intertwined with elements of domain-specific interests, power, managerial support, structural conditions, material and epistemic differences between knowledge domains. Research limitations/implications – The finding in this paper is based on a single case study: hence, the findings' generalizability may be limited. Practical implications – The paper argues that learning across knowledge domains needs various forms of supporting initiatives and constant readiness to alter or counteract when an initiative's shortcomings appear or undesired learning loops arise. Originality/value – The paper contributes to understanding the complexity of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings.
Article
Research argues that participants contribute to online communities because they have developed commitment to that community. Even relatively light commitment—“weak ties”—can make an impact on community participation. We hypothesize and empirically verify that users’ reading activity is an important factor in creating commitment. In doing so, we support and contextualize the Theory of Weak Ties through the investigation of weak “readership ties.” Our research formulates both of these constructs, readership ties and commitment, as part of a larger model that identifies perceived site asset value as an important antecedent for readership ties and, thus, commitment. The empirical investigation draws on survey data from 144 members of the Slashdot community. We find all of our hypotheses confirmed, indicating that all types of site assets (community members, knowledge, and technology) increase perceived site value, and that, in turn, increased perceived site asset value leads to more active usage and higher commitment, thus demonstrating the impact of weak ties.
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a systematic review on teacher collaboration. In total, 82 studies were selected based on predefined selection criteria and reviewed by means of a narrative review method to thematically gather information across the studies. A first aim of this review was to provide an overview of the terminological framework to describe teacher collaboration used in previous research. Collaboration was perceived here as a continuum ranging from mere aggregates of individuals to strong team collaboration. This continuum was conceptualised as the degree of team entitativity. Second, the review investigated the focus and depth of collaboration. These appeared to be important issues and provide different opportunities for (collaborative) learning. Third, although realising teacher collaboration proves to be challenging, this review listed benefits for students, teachers, and the school. Fourth and fifth, various facilitating and hindering factors were explored that may serve as valuable points of action to realise effective collaboration. The latter has vital importance for the future as it is needed to build schools into learning organisations, to anticipate the growing importance of collaboration in society and to use education as a role model for students to properly prepare them for the future.
Article
Within the framework of schools as communities of learning and practice, the purpose of the research upon which this article is based has been to analyze the perceptions of families with respect to the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of the European Schools. The findings of the research show that parents value highly the existence of the European Schools. However, they feel that more authentic participation and greater transparency is needed to transform the tendency toward bureaucratization and centralization in the system.
Article
Full-text available
A small-scale action research project was used to consider the policy and rhetoric surrounding development of the ‘expert learner’ and how this might be further explored to provide opportunities for learners to have greater direct involvement in reflection and discussion with teachers. The research was based within a further education setting, using participants from an ‘HE in FE’ curriculum area: teacher education. It sought to explore how involving students as partners in the peer observation process might be used to engage with student voice and enhance the teaching and learning experience for all involved. To evaluate the creation, sharing and development of teaching and learning that might be generated in such circumstances, the research used two theoretical frameworks to analyse the data: communities of practice and ecological learning systems. This article reviews the literature around these two frameworks and critically reflects on the influences of these approaches in communities of teaching and learning. Analysis of interviews, and the interactions and dialogue contained within these, revealed something else happening within these connections. As such, it considers the opportunities facilitated in this context and how development of a newly-devised continuum of practice may be used to enable professional dialogue to enhance student–teacher interactions.
Article
In recent years, professional learning networks (PLNs) and online learning communities of practices (CoPs) enabled by social media have emerged as a conduit and communal space for faculty members to engage in professional learning. This systematic review provides a current synthesis of research surrounding social media and professional development in higher education. Articles published in peer-reviewed journals between 2009 and 2019 were reviewed and 23 articles that met our selection criteria were included for further analysis and synthesis in this review. Findings suggest that research and practice on social media-supported professional learning is still in its infancy stage. Despite that social media-supported PLNs and CoPs show potential for contributing to faculty professional learning, challenges exist in sustaining faculty participation and engagement, as well as effectively navigating the social media space, especially for novice social media users. Practical implications and future research recommendations are discussed.
Chapter
Securing the equality and rights of women has in recent times become the campaign of many women’s organizations and activist movements. The slogans: “Women’s rights are human rights1” and “Women are also persons” are becoming mantras in campaigns against the abuse and violation of women’s rights across the globe (Osler & Starkey, 2010; Amien, 2001; Okin, 1998). In South Africa, in spite of a progressive Constitution in which the rights of women ought to be selfevident, the high number of women and girls who continue to be victims of gender-based discrimination and violence seems not to have dissipated.
Article
Full-text available
This conceptual paper aims to characterize science teachers’ practical knowledge utilizing a virtue-based theory of knowledge and the Aristotelian notion of phronesis/practical wisdom. The article argues that a greater understanding of the concept of phronesis and its relevance to science education would enrich our understandings of teacher knowledge, its development, and consequently models of teacher education. Views of teacher knowledge presented in this paper are informed by philosophical literature that questions normative views of knowledge and argues for a virtue-based epistemology rather than a belief-based one. The paper first outlines general features of phronesis/practical wisdom. Later, a virtue-based view of knowledge is described. A virtue-based view binds knowledge with moral concepts and suggests that knowledge development is motivated by intellectual virtues such as intellectual sobriety, perseverance, fairness, and humility. A virtue-based theory of knowledge gives prominence to the virtue of phronesis/practical wisdom, whose primary function is to mediate among virtues and theoretical knowledge into a line of action that serves human goods. The role of phronesis and its relevance to teaching science are explained accordingly. I also discuss differences among various characterizations of practical knowledge in science education and a virtue-based characterization. Finally, implications and further questions for teacher education are presented.
Article
Dissertation guiding principles and purposefully designed research curriculum guide the conceptualization and structure of dissertations in the EdD in Educational Technology at a large university in the US. An analysis of 69 dissertations completed by the first five cohorts over ten years was conducted to determine the theories, frameworks, and research designs used by professional students to conduct Educational Technology research in diverse contexts. The results indicated that students carefully assembled literature from various areas that reflect the diversity of disciplines and professional contexts in which dissertations were conducted, created and used conceptual frameworks that successfully provide a roadmap for research, adopted a variety of research approaches with mixed methods and qualitative approaches used more than quantitative approaches, and explicitly articulated processes for rigor and trustworthiness. Implications for program design and curriculum improvement are discussed.
Chapter
While classroom teachers are continuously trying to improve their instruction to increase student learning and engagement, dissatisfaction with professional development initiatives are often reported. Researchers examined the extant professional development literature and utilized the following distinct elements in this research design: a) teacher voice; b) teacher collaboration; c) critical reflection; and d) extended professional development time. In addition, the importance of alignment between teachers’ beliefs and the focus of professional development initiatives should not be underestimated. These five elements frame this mixed method study that is undergirded by a qualitative, multi-tiered data analysis of eight data sources including assessments of teacher’s beliefs and understanding of Problem-based Learning tenets as they navigate shifts in their classroom. This study is supported by a “beliefs of practice structure” framework [1] that includes both the teachers’ professed beliefs and their enacted beliefs, or pedagogical beliefs. Epistemic Network Analysis quantified the qualitatively coded data into visual graphs depicting teacher’s beliefs of practice structures before, at the midpoint, and at the end of the study. Statistically significant differences were found between the teacher’s Pre study graphs and their Mid study graphs, as well as between the Pre and Post study graphs, substantiating shifts in beliefs of practice structures that more closely align with PBL tenets. Data analysis confirms that the professional development model and its emphasis on the critical reflection cycle emboldened novice kindergarten teachers to implement changes in their classrooms.
Article
Video clubs have been used for more than a decade to support teachers’ professional noticing. Accordingly, numerous studies have evaluated video use as a tool for professional learning, concentrating on aspects such as video selection, club meetings, and teacher interviews. Yet, few researchers have considered noticing as a result of repeated experiences in video clubs, over time, or teachers’ perceptions of video clubs. In this study, we explored individual and collective teacher noticing and teachers’ perceived value of video club participation, incorporating multiple data sources. The study was conducted over one academic year with elementary teachers. Our results reveal that teachers noticed broad aspects of teaching as well as specifics of students’ mathematical thinking. Additionally, teachers perceived video club participation as prompting deeper thinking and reflection and encouraging application of learned pedagogical practices. Of interest, participant noticing appeared to converge over time, suggesting social construction of meaning based on collective experiences. Thus, we introduce the notion of collective noticing–a term we coin to describe the convergence of noticing that may result from repeated engagement and discourse between a group of teachers focused on the same videos over time. We encourage teacher educators to consider the specific foci of video clubs and the ramifications of collective, repeated experiences through the video club process.
Article
This paper reports on Phase Two of a small-scale qualitative research project. Phase One (2015–2016) focused on pre-service student teachers’ perceptions of observation and feedback in relation to their developing identity as teachers. In Phase Two, two previous participants reflected on the research findings as qualified and beginning teachers. New participants were invited to contribute their perspectives of the transition they had made from the Postgraduate Certificate in Post-Compulsory Education (PGCE PCE) one-year full-time course to their first year of teaching. Phase Two considers constructs of teacher identity and theoretical models of communities of practice and ecological learning systems. Participants reviewed transitions from PGCE PCE into their first year of teaching in relation to a continuum of practice that saw them taking increased levels of ownership of their development. They described the extent to which and the ways in which they identified themselves with the teacher role and as members of a community at work. Applications of the community of practice model were discussed and occasionally compared unfavourably to the community of practice context of the PGCE PCE course. Community of practice concepts such as ‘membership’ and ‘validation’ are re-explored in this paper.
Article
Full-text available
The primary purpose of this phenomenographic qualitative study is to identify a group of second-year undergraduate architecture students’ conceptions of learning technology use. The secondary purpose is to examine students’ learning experiences, perceptions, and feelings of technology use in an education course. Data were collected over a week by individually interviewing 15 architecture students, who were becoming teachers of architecture. Each 20-min individual interview was audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated into English, and analysed to identify descriptive categories of the students’ conceptions of learning technology use. The six descriptive categories were: learning online; searching for information and knowledge, defining social media connectivity, exploring a virtual place, designing a model house, and transferring knowledge and understanding. Most architecture students expressed the technology-integrated lessons were interesting. The architecture students perceived educational games as the most useful teaching tools in their future classrooms. The study implies phenomenography can be used as an assessment tool to identify students’ conceptions and characterize their structural aspects, which may be used as curriculum frameworks to design content that moves architecture students from the periphery to the core of the subject.
Article
This case study focuses on teachers’ professional development in NanoScience and nanoTechnology (NST). In the context of a Community of Learners (CoL), in-service teachers in collaboration with science education researchers, nanoscience researchers and experts from science museums, developed a teaching module. This module integrates NST topics along with aspects of science communication, i.e. development of science exhibits and socio-scientific issues, e.g. ethics regarding the research in this field. The data were gathered over 1-year period by using video recordings and interviews. The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth was used to study the processes that support teachers’ professional change in this context, as they are elicited from their interactions in the CoL. Our findings indicate that the dynamic of teachers’ interactions with colleagues and the mediating processes that impact on their professional learning, are crafted on the basis of the emerged challenges in each phase of module’s design and development. These findings give an insight on teachers’ professional learning as they transfer their professional knowledge regarding scientific topics which are innovative to them, i.e. NST, into their teaching practice. In this respect, this study contributes to research literature relevant to teachers’ professionalisation in order to implement innovations in the classroom.
Article
Full-text available
In the past five years, informal science institutions (ISIs), science communication, advocacy and citizen action groups, funding organizations, and policy-makers in the UK and the USA have become increasingly involved in efforts to promote increased public engagement with science and technology (PEST). Such engagement is described as taking place within the context of a “new mood for dialogue” between scientific and technical experts and the public. Mechanisms to increase PEST have taken a number of forms. One of the most visible features of this shift towards PEST in ISIs is the organization and staging of adult-focused, face-to-face forums that bring scientific and technical experts, social scientists, and policy-makers into discussion with members of the public about contemporary scientific and socioscientific issues related to the development and application of science and technology. A significant aspect of the literature on efforts to increase PEST has focused on the development of a unifying evaluative framework for determining what counts as success for PEST mechanisms, and how success (or lack thereof) can be empirically measured. In this article, we draw from our experiences as UK-based and US-based “dialogue event” practitioners and researchers/evaluators to suggest that these existing evaluative criteria are insufficient to explore the role and value of ISI-based “dialogue events.” Instead, we suggest that it may be productive to research and evaluate these ISI-based “dialogue events” as sites of learning. Secondly, however, we show through a discussion of our own research frameworks that understanding these “dialogue events” as sites of learning does not intuitively provide a framework for understanding what counts as success for these efforts. Instead, research on the role of “dialogue” within the educational literature—and the connections between “dialogue” and competing understandings of the nature of science and society—offers a multiplicity of approaches to defining the terms and goals of these events. Finally, we identify two broader implications of researching and evaluating these “dialogue events” as sites of learning for ISIs and all efforts to increase PEST.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.