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Indo-Caribbean Masculinities and Indo-Caribbean Feminisms: Where Are We Now?

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Abstract

Over the last four decades a significant body of feminist scholarship by and about Indo-Caribbean women has emerged. The same is not true for Indo-Caribbean men. The now classic essay by Neils Sampath (1993) continues to have resonance with its application of Peter Wilson’s “reputation and respectability” framework to Indo-Trinidadian male youth; yet much has changed since 1993. Using multidisciplinary sources, this chapter reviews the scholarship on Indo-Caribbean masculinities in the context of Caribbean masculinity discourses and the larger body of Indo-Caribbean and Caribbean feminist writing.

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... Such messages are shaped and disseminated by an androcentric and patriarchal hegemonic society whose cultural norms and attitudes are prejudiced against women (Reddock 2016). ...
... Thus, the visual representation of women in Jamaican science textbooks should be a consideration in a study of this nature since the social identities and roles of women in Jamaica differs in many ways from those in wealthier nations. Jamaica is still, for the most part, a conservative country, with a long history of colonialism, and the traditional roles of men and women still exist and operate (Reddock, 2016). Thus, despite considerable reconfiguration in gender equality in some aspects of the Jamaican workforce and education system, a feeling of unease still persists regarding the dearth of women in science, when compared with so-called first world countries (Elliot, 2013). ...
... Over the last three decades there has been heightening awareness in Jamaica about the need to bring gender issues into the mainstream and a renewed interest in the relationship between ideology and gender realities within Jamaican society (Reddock 2016). Research led by the Centre of Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies has shifted the argument from the established dyadic logic of gender ideologies -dominance versus subjugation, oppression versus privilege, master versus subject -to a more holistic understanding of the intersecting social categories which affect the experiences of women in Jamaica and which are seen as impediments to upward mobility. ...
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The gender gap in post-compulsory science education remains a key concern for educators in many countries. Over the last two decades significant effort has been placed in a number of initiatives aimed not only at raising the profile of science in schools, but also at widening female participation. Despite these initiatives, the rate of female participation in science has typically remained below that of males. Although many reasons have been advanced to explain this, visual representations in school science textbooks remain under-researched. Against a background of gender disparity in the Jamaican education system, this article examines the extent to which visual representations in a widely used school science textbook reinforce or ameliorate gender stereotypes. The results indicate that the textbook presents implicit support for gender-biased messages, though in ways that are more subtle than might be supposed. There were a number of ways in which the images did not favour males over females but there were also other ways in which males were more likely to be portrayed as powerful and in high-status ‘positions’, while females were more likely to be depicted in inferior situations. Such gender representations may affect how students see themselves in relation to science.
... Such messages are shaped and disseminated by an androcentric and patriarchal hegemonic society whose cultural norms and attitudes are prejudiced against women (Reddock, 2016). Thus, the visual representation of women in Jamaican science textbooks should be a consideration in a study of this nature since the social identities and roles of women in Jamaica differs in many ways from those in wealthier nations. ...
... Thus, the visual representation of women in Jamaican science textbooks should be a consideration in a study of this nature since the social identities and roles of women in Jamaica differs in many ways from those in wealthier nations. Jamaica is still, for the most part, a conservative country, with a long history of colonialism, and the traditional roles of men and women still exist and operate (Reddock, 2016). Thus, despite considerable reconfiguration in gender equality in some aspects of the Jamaican workforce and education system, a feeling of unease still persists regarding the dearth of women in science, when compared with so-called first world countries (Elliott, 2013). ...
... Over the last three decades there has been heightening awareness in Jamaica about the need to bring gender issues into the mainstream and a renewed interest in the relationship between ideology and gender realities within Jamaican society (Reddock, 2016). Research led by the Centre of Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies has shifted the argument from the established dyadic logic of gender ideologiesdominance versus subjugation, oppression versus privilege, master versus subjectto a more holistic understanding of the intersecting social categories which affect the experiences of women in Jamaica and which are seen as impediments to upward mobility. ...
Article
Full-text available
The gender gap in post-compulsory science education remains a key concern for educators in many countries. Over the last two decades significant effort has been placed in a number of initiatives aimed not only at raising the profile of science in schools, but also at widening female participation. Despite these initiatives, the rate of female participation in science has typically remained below that of males. Although many reasons have been advanced to explain this, visual representations in school science textbooks remain under-researched. Against a background of gender disparity in the Jamaican education system, this article examines the extent to which visual representations in a widely used school science textbook reinforce or ameliorate gender stereotypes. The results indicate that the textbook presents implicit support for gender-biased messages, though in ways that are more subtle than might be supposed. There were a number of ways in which the images did not favour males over females but there were also other ways in which males were more likely to be portrayed as powerful and in high-status ‘positions’, while females were more likely to be depicted in inferior situations. Such gender representations may affect how students see themselves in relation to science.
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