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Impact of the Mindful Emotional Intelligence Program on Emotional Regulation in College Students

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The present study tests the effectiveness of the Mindful Emotional Intelligence Program (PINEP) that appeared from the fusion of two concepts; emotional intelligence and mindfulness. The program was given as training to 136 mixed gender college studentsduring a two month period. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of (PINEP) and to know how students regulate their emotions. Student emotional behavior wasevaluated before and after the PINEP program was carried out using self-report measures selected for their reliability. These were: mindfulness, burnout, engagement, neuroticism, extroversion, emotional regulation, and empathy. The results showed moderate significant differences (Cohen’s d) in the dimension of extroversion, burnout, engagement, acting with consciousness, refocus on planning, positive reappraisal, putting into perspective and empathy. The outcome pointed toward favorable changes in relation with the program PINEP as the students showed significant changes in the way they regulated their emotions after the training.
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... Schutte and Malouff (2011) investigated the relationship between the three constructs and suggested that the core attentional and non-judgmental aspects of mindfulness may encourage individuals to develop better emotional regulation and general EI, leading to increased well-being. A study by Enríquez et al. (2017) adds further support to the mindfulness-EI relationship. In an experiment using a mindfulness intervention, pre-and post-test scores two months apart were obtained from self-report questionnaires measuring burnout, engagement, emotional regulation, empathy, and personality traits. ...
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