Conference Paper

Speed Dating on Smart Contracts

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Abstract

The workshop enables its participants to dive into the future potential of Contract Law associated with technical innovations of blockchain technology. While the latter is mostly known as the technical foundation of the crypto-currency Bitcoin, another field of application has recently come into focus: Smart Contracts. The possibility of self-executing, fully automatized contracts asks not only for the adaptability of the law to the rules of a digital world, but also challenges the foundation of a modern state: its duty to protect the exercise of party autonomy. In a concept of speedy one-on-one-discussions, the workshop tries to build interdisciplinary bridges between law and computer science in order to access new fields of research.

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... GDPR) will take steps in this direction fairly soon-and they will need scientific help from the blockchain community. In order to master the herculean task of defining technology-specific standards, the fields of computer science and law must align themselves more closely-a perspective that supplies the impetus for our interdisciplinary work [10] and [11]. ...
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He studied law at Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and Yeditepe Üniversitesi Istanbul and completed his legal clerkship in Mannheim and Berlin. His special interests are Constitutional Law
  • Mario Martini
Mario Martini). He studied law at Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and Yeditepe Üniversitesi Istanbul and completed his legal clerkship in Mannheim and Berlin. His special interests are Constitutional Law, IT-Law, Direct Democracy and Criminology.