Book

The Computer Clubhouse: Constructionism and Creativity in Youth Communities. Technology, Education--Connections

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Abstract

This book is about the Computer Clubhouse--the idea and the place--that inspires youth to think about themselves as competent, creative, and critical learners. So much of the social life of young people has moved online and participation in the digital public has become an essential part of youth identities. The Computer Clubhouse makes an important contribution not just in local urban communities but also as a model for after-school learning environments globally. The model has been uniquely successful scaling up, with over 100 clubhouses thriving worldwide. Showcasing research by scholars and evaluators that have documented and analyzed the international Computer Clubhouse Network, this volume considers the implications of their findings in the context of what it means to prepare youth to meet the goals of the 21st Century. Book features include: (1) A successful, scalable model for providing at-risk youth a rich array of media design and computing experiences; (2) Diverse examples of media created in the clubhouse, ranging from digital stories, video games, interface designs, and digital art projects; (3) Color photos of life in the clubhouse, including youth projects; and (4) Interviews with stakeholders in the clubhouse network, from the director to coordinators at various international clubhouses. This book begins with "The Computer Clubhouse: A Place for Youth," an introduction by Yasmin Kafai, Kylie Peppler, and Robbin Chapman. It is divided into four parts. Part I, The Computer Clubhouse Model, contains: (1) Origins and Guiding Principles of the Computer Clubhouse (Natalie Rusk, Mitchel Resnick, and Stina Cooke); (2) Going Global: Clubhouse Ideas Travel Around the World (Patricia Diaz); and (3) Perspectives from the Field: It Takes a Village to Raise a Clubhouse (Kylie Peppler, Robbin Chapman, and Yasmin Kafai). Part II, Creative Constructions, contains: (4) Making Games, Art, and Animations with Scratch (Kylie Peppler and Yasmin Kafai); (5) Interface Design with Hook-Ups (Amon Millner); and (6) Youth Video Productions of Dance Performances (Kylie Peppler and Yasmin Kafai). Part III, Collaborations in the Clubhouse Community, contains: (7) Encouraging Peer Sharing: Learning Reflections in a Community of Designers (Robbin Chapman); (8) The Multiple Roles of Mentors (Yasmin Kafai, Shiv Desai, Kylie Peppler, Grace Chiu, and Jesse Moya); and (9) The Computer Clubhouse Village: Sharing Ideas and Connecting Communities of Designers Across Borders (Elizabeth Sylvan). Part IV: Showcases of Computer Clubhouse Successes, contains: (10) Participation, Engagement, and Youth Impact in the Clubhouse Network (Gail Breslow); (11) Hear Our Voices: Girls Developing Technology Fluency (Brenda Abanavas and Robbin Chapman); and (12) From Photoshop to Programming (Yasmin Kafai, Kylie Peppler, Grace Chiu, John Maloney, Natalie Rusk, and Mitchel Resnick). An epilogue, "A Place for the Future," by Yasmin Kafai, Kylie Peppler, and Robbin Chapman, and an index are included. [Foreword by Barton J. Hirsch and Rosalind Hudnell.]
... Research with youth worldwide suggests that membership in multidimensional media culture is joining ethnic, institutional, and geographic affiliations as important sources of young people's identity development or how they and others construct possibilities of being in the world (Dolby and Rizvi 2007;McCarthy et al. 2003). Much of this participation and identity formation is part of a ''participatory culture'' (Jenkins 2008;Halverson 2009;Kafai and Peppler 2011). Participatory practices include the democratization of media creation, distributed expertise, a focus on skills rather than abilities, and a flattening of traditional hierarchical knowledge and learning structures (Jenkins 2008). ...
... Research with youth worldwide suggests that membership in multidimensional media culture is joining ethnic, institutional, and geographic affiliations as important sources of young people's identity development or how they and others construct possibilities of being in the world (Dolby and Rizvi 2007;McCarthy et al. 2003). Much of this participation and identity formation is part of a ''participatory culture'' (Jenkins 2008;Halverson 2009;Kafai and Peppler 2011). Participatory practices include the democratization of media creation, distributed expertise, a focus on skills rather than abilities, and a flattening of traditional hierarchical knowledge and learning structures (Jenkins 2008). ...
... Much of this participation and identity formation is part of a ''participatory culture'' (Jenkins 2008;Halverson 2009;Kafai and Peppler 2011). Participatory practices include the democratization of media creation, distributed expertise, a focus on skills rather than abilities, and a flattening of traditional hierarchical knowledge and learning structures (Jenkins 2008). ...
Article
Full-text available
Access to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields serves as a key entry point to economic mobility and civic enfranchisement. Such access must take seriously the intellectual power of the knowledge and practices of non-dominant youth. In our case, this has meant to shift epistemic authority in mathematics from academic institutions to young people themselves. This article is about why high school-aged students, from underrepresented groups, choose to participate in an out-of-school time program in which they teach younger children in the domains of mathematics and computer science. It argues for programmatic principles based on access, identity engagement, relationship building, and connections to community to support underrepresented youth as learners, teachers, leaders, and organizers in mathematics-related activities using game design as the focus of activity.
... Rather, we found that many moments of intercultural learning emerge not in spite of gaps, frictions, or breakdowns among participants, resources, and program goals, but because of them. Building on themes in cultural psychology and constructionist pedagogy [23,47,56], our work thus suggests a delicate and artful balancing act: too much structure and emergent opportunities for learning may be suffocated and squandered; not enough and classes may remain fractured and contentious. This finding echoes long-standing CSCW findings on articulation and coordination work in knowledge-work environments [102,108,109] and aligns with recent work in the anthropology of global connections which finds that "...misunderstandings -far from producing conflict -[allow people] to work together, " and that "[c]ultural diversity brings a creative friction to global connections" which generates insights and sparks novel paths forward [119, p. x]. ...
... Two separate efforts constitute rare exceptions: emerging translanguaging programs [126], which use computing education as a medium of linguistic and cultural exchange, usually between Spanish-and English-speaking students in the U.S.; and Come_IN computer clubs, a decade-strong program of the University of Siegen fostering integration of Turkish migrants [103,110,129]. Come_IN adopts the model of Computer Clubs, constructionist open-ended community spaces for marginalized youth housing computers [56]. In 2010, Come_IN launched in the West Bank with the intent of fostering intercultural interaction among refugee youth and student tutors living outside the camp [1-3, 128, 132]. ...
Article
This paper explores computing education as a potential site for intercultural learning and encounter in post-conflict environments. It reports on ethnographic fieldwork from the Nairobi Play Project, a constructionist educational program serving adolescents aged 14-18 in urban and rural multi-ethnic refugee communities in Kenya. While the program offers programming and game design instruction, an equal goal is to foster interaction, collaboration, dialogue and understanding across cultural backgrounds. Based on fieldwork from two project cycles involving 5 after-school classes of 12-24 students each, we describe key affordances for encounter, important resistances to be managed or overcome, and emergent complications in the execution of such programs. We argue that many important accomplishments of intercultural learning occur through moments of friction, breakdowns, and gaps -- for example, technical challenges that produce sites of shared humour; frictions between intercultural activities and computing activities; acts of disrupting order; and unstructured time that students collaboratively fill in. We also describe significant complications in such programs, including pressures to adopt norms and practices consistent with dominant or majority cultures, and instances of intercultural bonding over artefacts with xenophobic themes. We reflect on the implications of these phenomena for the design of future programs that use computing as a backbone for intercultural learning or diversity and inclusion efforts in CSCW, ICTD, and allied fields of work.
... Digital and networked technologies are used to support such learning experiences and to overcome the participation gap (Jenkins et al. 2009) in which youth of different socioeconomic backgrounds experience unequal access to the skills needed to use digital tools effectively. Further influenced by research on informal learning (e.g., Barron 2006;Kafai, Peppler, and Chapman 2009;Ahn et al. 2014), connected learning posits that out-of-school learning experiences can offer young people chances to deepen their interests and connect to academic and career opportunities, access tools and expertise, and form a sense of belonging to communities of practice (Lave and Wenger 1991). ...
... Connected learning environments are production centered, leverage openly networked infrastructures to facilitate learning, and bring together young people and adults around a shared purpose . In production-centered learning environments, young people learn by doing and making, whether programming an original game in Scratch, writing fanfiction stories, or creating "smart clothing" with e-textiles (Kafai et al. 2009). Openly networked infrastructures make it possible for youth to share their creations with audiences of import, such as peers, parents, teachers, community members, and domain experts. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article extends prior work investigating public youth librarians’ efforts to incorporate digital media technologies into youth programming. We conducted interviews and focus groups with 92 youth-serving library staff working in public libraries across the United States. Using connected learning as a theoretical framework, our analysis revealed various ways that technology is used in youth-focused library programming, providing youth with opportunities to collaborate with peers and adults, to pursue their interests, and to exercise creativity through production-centered activities. Our analysis also revealed specific challenges facing public youth librarians in their efforts to leverage digital and networked technologies to create equitable, inclusive learning environments. This article contributes new empirical evidence demonstrating the specific roles that librarians can play in creating rich, technology-enabled environments for diverse youth patrons and the resources and supports librarians need to succeed in their efforts.
... staff people, reference materials) are all design elements of a learning space that can maximize children's positive interactions with novel digital tools (Antle and Wise, 2013;Bers, 2012;Bers et al., 2018;Syvertsen and Pigozzi, 2010). Makerspaces have been identified as community spaces that can support apprentice-mentor relationships, promote democratization of knowledge, and foster community engagement (Blikstein and Worsley, 2014;Kafai, Peppler, and Chapman, 2009;Rajala 2016;Sheridan et al., 2014). This is because makerspaces are designed to allow a variety of experimental and learnerdriven approaches to design-oriented tasks with novel tools, so they welcome a diversity of learning styles while also supporting conventional engineering and technologist practices (Kafai et al., 2009;Syvertsen and Pigozzi, 2010). ...
... Makerspaces have been identified as community spaces that can support apprentice-mentor relationships, promote democratization of knowledge, and foster community engagement (Blikstein and Worsley, 2014;Kafai, Peppler, and Chapman, 2009;Rajala 2016;Sheridan et al., 2014). This is because makerspaces are designed to allow a variety of experimental and learnerdriven approaches to design-oriented tasks with novel tools, so they welcome a diversity of learning styles while also supporting conventional engineering and technologist practices (Kafai et al., 2009;Syvertsen and Pigozzi, 2010). This distributed expertise across all members of the group (rather than just one educator) can also address challenges of unconfident teachers who are uncertain about how to teach new technologies and skills Litts, 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
As education communities grow more interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), schools have integrated more technology and engineering opportunities into their curricula. Makerspaces for all ages have emerged as a way to support STEM learning through creativity, community building, and hands-on learning. However, little research has evaluated the learning that happens in these spaces, especially in young children. One framework that has been used successfully as an evaluative tool in informal and technology-rich learning spaces is Positive Technological Development (PTD). PTD is an educational framework that describes positive behaviors children exhibit while engaging in digital learning experiences. In this exploratory case study, researchers observed children in a makerspace to determine whether the environment (the space and teachers) contributed to children’s Positive Technological Development. N = 20 children and teachers from a Kindergarten classroom were observed over 6 hours as they engaged in makerspace activities. The children’s activity, teacher’s facilitation, and the physical space were evaluated for alignment with the PTD framework. Results reveal that children showed high overall PTD engagement, and that teachers and the space supported children’s learning in complementary aspects of PTD. Recommendations for practitioners hoping to design and implement a young children’s makerspace are discussed.
... The theory of constructionism "postulated that an individual learns best when making artifacts that can be shared with others and that computers offer privileged ways for children to do so" (Papert, 1980 as cited in Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). Undergirded by this philosophy, Global Kids, Inc. and the New York Public Library founded NYC Haunts, a STEM-based learning program in which youth designers create mobile, geo-locative alternate reality games that explore local history and contemporary issues facing a particular New York City neighborhood. ...
... Research done at the Computer Clubhouse centers around the world has suggested that there are multiple roles for adult facilitators and mentors to play in supporting students in "identifying and pursuing their interests" within the context of using technology to in production-centered activities (Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). ...
Conference Paper
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Résumé: Cette communication propose une réflexion sur l’emploi des récits de vie en contexte scolaire. Nous assistons, depuis plus de 30 ans, à une valorisation des récits de vie en éducation (Dominicé, 1990 ; Pineau, 1984). Or, leur utilisation ne va pas de soi. Elle suppose une conceptualisation du récit, un cadre interprétatif permettant d’en comprendre le sens, la prise en compte de certaines limites et la mise en œuvre de précautions. Sans réflexion préalable, sans balises conceptuelles, l’apport des récits de vie peut être banalisé et tomber dans la superficialité. La réflexion est donc de mise et des précautions d’usage s’imposent (Clapier-Valladon & Poirier, 1983 ; Lani-Bayle, 2014). Le cadre de l’interactionnisme symbolique, largement adopté dans l’approche biographique, est le cadre privilégié dans cette communication (Goodson, 2001 ; Vanini De Carlo, 2014
... The theory of constructionism "postulated that an individual learns best when making artifacts that can be shared with others and that computers offer privileged ways for children to do so" (Papert, 1980 as cited in Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). Undergirded by this philosophy, Global Kids, Inc. and the New York Public Library founded NYC Haunts, a STEM-based learning program in which youth designers create mobile, geo-locative alternate reality games that explore local history and contemporary issues facing a particular New York City neighborhood. ...
... Research done at the Computer Clubhouse centers around the world has suggested that there are multiple roles for adult facilitators and mentors to play in supporting students in "identifying and pursuing their interests" within the context of using technology to in production-centered activities (Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). ...
... The theory of constructionism "postulated that an individual learns best when making artifacts that can be shared with others and that computers offer privileged ways for children to do so" (Papert, 1980 as cited in Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). Undergirded by this philosophy, Global Kids, Inc. and the New York Public Library founded NYC Haunts, a STEM-based learning program in which youth designers create mobile, geo-locative alternate reality games that explore local history and contemporary issues facing a particular New York City neighborhood. ...
... Research done at the Computer Clubhouse centers around the world has suggested that there are multiple roles for adult facilitators and mentors to play in supporting students in "identifying and pursuing their interests" within the context of using technology to in production-centered activities (Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). ...
... The theory of constructionism "postulated that an individual learns best when making artifacts that can be shared with others and that computers offer privileged ways for children to do so" (Papert, 1980 as cited in Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). Undergirded by this philosophy, Global Kids, Inc. and the New York Public Library founded NYC Haunts, a STEM-based learning program in which youth designers create mobile, geo-locative alternate reality games that explore local history and contemporary issues facing a particular New York City neighborhood. ...
... Research done at the Computer Clubhouse centers around the world has suggested that there are multiple roles for adult facilitators and mentors to play in supporting students in "identifying and pursuing their interests" within the context of using technology to in production-centered activities (Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). ...
... It is through the agency that the youth demonstrated in this evolution-the shifts they made in the roles they took on, and in the design of new roles for themselves-that we believe individual and cultural relevance within the program emerges. Other studies of informal urban education programs describe similar situations where youth create and embody leadership roles as they participate in the community (e.g., Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2010;Ching & Kafai, 2008;Heath, 2004;Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). Calabrese Barton and Tan (2010) focus on how these roles often involve imaginative, hybrid practices as marginalized youth create "expert" identities that are socially and culturally situated. ...
... Informal technology education programs are poised to support this kind of designing role for students: The flexible structure allows for more varied roles and ways of participating than in a traditional classroom, the tools allow for open-ended creative and collaborative production, and the widely diverse forms of technology available allows for expertise to be distributed (Kafai et al., 2009). A perspective rooted in culturally relevant digital pedagogy and studio design focuses on how students' diverse individual and cultural backgrounds can be assets in the development of technological tools and instruction. ...
Article
Collaboration (GDMC), an informal education program in 3D computer modeling and 2D interactive game design serving primarily African American youth aged 7 to 19 years in the Washington, D.C. metro area, transformed from a program designed and taught by adults to one designed and taught by youth. In Year 1, 8% of youth participants held a leadership role; by Year 4, 30% of youth participants did. Moreover, the nature of these roles transformed, with youth increasingly taking on responsibilities formerly held by adults. In this qualitative study, the authors describe and seek to understand this role shifting. Through the extensive collection and analysis of field observations over 4 years, the authors describe qualitative shifts in the agency involved in these roles—moving from a conception of youth as student to assistant to youth as designer and implementer of instruction. The authors analyze changes in youth agency that accompanied their implementation of the studio mentorship model where classrooms were transformed from traditional teacher-led classes to studios with a 1:3 ratio of peer mentors to students. The authors describe how, following this shift, youth initiated new instructional roles leading to the creation of a mentor-instructor pipeline. The authors pose the GDMC program as an example to discuss how culturally relevant computing practice emerges from a programmatic goal of viewing youth as assets and actively seeking ways to support youth’s initiatives and agency in digital technology education. The authors argue for the value of this asset building in technology education as a way to encourage youth from traditionally underserved groups to become technology leaders and innovators.
... The following study uses this framework of organizing social futures to explore another area that has been a historical focus of the Learning Sciences -informal learning with technology, specifically within the context of informal out of school organizations (Santo, 2017a;Kafai et al., 2009). In doing so, we attempt to make more transparent the ways that such learning settings conceptualize their role and how technology plays a part in it. ...
... Come_IN is based on the computer clubhouse project in the United States [3] which has sparked a global network of such clubs which are all centered around collaborative learning via ICT. This is framed by constructionism as a learning theory which describes learning as the construction of individual cognitive structures (mental models) embedded in a situated context which is best facilitated by the construction of actual digital and physical artifacts [2]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Come_IN computer clubs are well established and long-running constructionist facilities in Germany and Palestine in which children and adults can learn, play and collaborate on projects using ICT. We are currently expanding the clubs into the realms of making, tinkering and digital fabrication. This paper outlines the clubs, their educational background and our previous and ongoing projects relating to making in the clubs which relate to Arduino and 3d-printing. We then expand on our aims for the future which comprise laser cutting / engraving. At the Teaching to Tinker workshop, we plan to assemble a DIY laser cutter and to discuss its application in educational settings on the living object, so to speak.
... Grounded in the fields of education, developmental and social psychology, and cognitive science, the Computer Clubhouse model has grown to a network of more than 100 active youth community learning centers across 20 countries around the world. Their impact and success is well documented in research [32,16,24]. ...
Conference Paper
The study explores the positive impact for girls and young women from engaging in computer clubs, with regard to their vocational preparation as well as to their social empowerment. Our comparative study focuses on gender related barriers in a Palestinian refugee camp as well as an intercultural neighborhood in Germany and discusses how the computer club can contribute to overcoming these. Findings indicate a positive impact of open and collaborative working and learning structures; in Palestine and Germany alike.
... Other studies of informal education programs in urban areas describe similar situations where youth create and embody leadership roles as they participate in the community (e.g.,Barton & Tan, 2010 ;Ching & Kafai, 2008;Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009;Heath, 2004). CalabreseBarton & Tan (2010)focus on how these roles often involve imaginative, hybrid practices as marginalized youth create " expert " identities that are socially and culturally situated. ...
Article
Full-text available
Collaboration (GDMC), an informal education program in 3D computer modeling and 2D interactive game design serving primarily African American youth aged 7 to 19 years in the Washington, D.C. metro area, transformed from a program designed and taught by adults to one designed and taught by youth. In Year 1, 8% of youth participants held a leadership role; by Year 4, 30% of youth participants did. Moreover, the nature of these roles transformed, with youth increasingly taking on responsibilities formerly held by adults. In this qualitative study, the authors describe and seek to understand this role shifting. Through the extensive collection and analysis of field observations over 4 years, the authors describe qualitative shifts in the agency involved in these roles—moving from a conception of youth as student to assistant to youth as designer and implementer of instruction. The authors analyze changes in youth agency that accompanied their implementation of the studio mentorship model where classrooms were transformed from traditional teacher-led classes to studios with a 1:3 ratio of peer mentors to students. The authors describe how, following this shift, youth initiated new instructional roles leading to the creation of a mentor-instructor pipeline. The authors pose the GDMC program as an example to discuss how culturally relevant computing practice emerges from a programmatic goal of viewing youth as assets and actively seeking ways to support youth’s initiatives and agency in digital technology education. The authors argue for the value of this asset building in technology education as a way to encourage youth from traditionally underserved groups to become technology leaders and innovators.
... Secondly, on the socio(-technical) level, we suggest two topical foci for contributions: Education and the common good, which are both interrelated. Educational aspects as well as cases of digital fabrication and community-oriented approaches in/for educational contexts have already been well-established and feature a corresponding body of theory and practice [2,5,10,21]. The common good is also a domain with substantial prior work in evidence -the existing literature often features undertones or explicit perspectives on values, power distribution, collaboration, international cooperation, humanitarianism and other facets of the common good [8,12,18,25]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
3D printing has become an area of intense interest in a variety of disciplines ranging from industry through education, humanitarian and innovation contexts on a research and practice level. At the same time, technologies, materials, usages and appropriation are in constant flux. 3D printing is, however just one of the many facet of digital fabrication, the digitalization of more and more sectors, " Industry 4.0 " as well as increasing community-based innovation and (open/commons-oriented) engineering practices. The proposed workshop is intended to illustrate and discuss cases, positions, concepts and experiences related to such developments in digital fabrication, especially in 3D printing. We specifically look for contributions highlighting the role of digital fabrication and 3D printing for the common good and the education sector. This is in line with C&T's socio-technical focus, research suggesting the immense potential in digital fabrication and education as well as growing practices in using digital fabrication/3D printing in humanitarian efforts.
... I considered this framework to be like a weather vane that would help me figure out which way the wind blew. Brown & Adler, 2008;Brown & Duguid, 2002;Burton, 2000Burton, , 2009Coole & Frost, 2010;Gee, 2004Gee, , 2007Gee, , 2010Gee, , 2013Gee & Hayes, 2011;Hetland et al., 2013;Ito, 2010;Ito et al., 2009Ito et al., , 2013Jenkins et al., 2009;Kafai, Peppler & Chapman, 2009;Lankshear & Knobel, 2011Lave & Wenger, 1991;Martinez & Stager, 2013;Papert, 1980aPapert, , 1980bPapert, , 1993Papert, , 2001Papert & Harel, 1991;Peppler, 2013;Resnick, 2002Resnick, , 2008Thomas & Brown, 2011. ( In addition to literature from the maker and digital media learning movements, I also drew from digital media theory, posthumanism and new materialism, thereby entangling 21 st century learning behaviors (Jenkins, et al., 2009;Twining et al., 2013) with constructionism (Papert & Harel, 1991); artistic development (Burton, 2000(Burton, , 2009; connected or interest-driven learning (Ito et al., 2013;Peppler, 2013); and a characteristic of digital materiality I came to call decentered embodiment. ...
... What do youth draw upon from their lived experiences in STEM-rich making? 2. How are these efforts by youth supported in the making space through pedagogical approaches that integrate community ethnography with STEM-rich making? These interests build on the work of scholars who have investigated youths' engagement as critical learners in afterschool STEM programs across a range of disciplines, including digital technologies, graphic design, and music making (Kafai, Peppler, & Chapman, 2009). ...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated how community ethnography as a pedagogy approach to STEM-rich making supported youth makers from two low-income urban communities engaged in sustained STEM-rich making towards making a difference in their communities. Data is drawn from two-year long ethnographic data across two community-based, youth making programs. We highlight two cases. Case # 1 focuses on one African American girl's making endeavors across one school year. Case # 2 looks at how two youth engaged in critical sense-making with regards to the currently available how-to making resources they could locate online. We discuss how these pedagogical moves supported the youth in making towards a more just future in ways that addressed intersecting scales of injustice.
... To address the underrepresentation of women and minorities in the tech industry [1], many efforts are underway to broaden participation in K-12 computer science (CS) education, motivate interest in computing and not only introduce but also deepen their understanding of computational ideas. Many outreach efforts such as Code Start, Girls Who Code, and Black Girls Code (for example, [2]) and community spaces such as Computer Clubhouses [3] have provided opportunities for underrepresented groups to learn computer programming. Programming tools such as Scratch [4], Alice [5] and others have been designed to provide a low threshold for exploring computational ideas and connect to a variety of interests. ...
Conference Paper
Just over a decade ago, various electronic textile construction kits have emerged with Arduino-based microcontrollers, sensors, and actuators that can be sewn together with conductive thread to create wearables augmented with new functionalities. These kits were designed to broaden participation in and perspectives about computing along with introducing learners to powerful ideas about circuitry and coding. In this paper, we synthesize 46 studies that have introduced crafts, circuitry, and coding concepts with e-textiles in K-16 education. We found that e-textiles have been successful in broadening participation and increasing interest in computing for many youth and adults, especially from underrepresented groups, inside and outside of school. While the e-textiles construction kits have been successful in deepening learning of circuitry concepts, learning of computer science, especially advanced concepts, has been far less attended to with the exception of projects designed by undergraduate students with already significant disciplinary expertise. In the discussion, we suggest directions for future research such as bringing more computing into e-textile designs, creating assessments to capture coding and circuitry learning, and developing models for more advanced projects to leverage the potential of e-textiles for computer science education.
... • K-12 schools (Hlubinka, M., et al. 2013;Blikstein, 2013;Kalil, 2013) • Universities (Kemp, 2013) • Libraries (Abram, 2013;Barniskis, 2014, Kroski, 2013 • Garages (Kemp, 2013) • Museums (Bevan, et al. 2015) • Mobile, touring (Barniskis, 2014) • Community centers (Maker Education Initiative, 2012;Kafai et al., 2009). ...
Thesis
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This Capstone paper considers current educational, professional development in United States public schools and proposes a disruptive innovation for improvement. This paper addresses how an educational, professional development experience can help characterize and document the learning that takes place in a Makerspace. This paper proposes that a Makerspace innovation would leverage best practices of Autonomy, Resources, Time, and Expert guidance that are necessary for effective educational, professional development. This paper coalesces the community resources of Private University, Community College, local hobby club, and school district administration in a mid-size city to produce the Maker Community Guild Option for educational, professional development. This innovation is supported by learning theories of experiential learning, constructivism, and constructionism. It is further supported by the instructional frameworks of Design Thinking and Technological Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (TPACK). A supportive peer network will include More Knowledgeable Others and System Conveners. The Maker Community Guild Option for professional development will follow a research-based approach producing a 4-phase initiative with a summer MakeCamp pilot for educators. Qualitative and quantitative research tools will assess the experiences of the participants. Together, these features comprise an integrative matrix to promote and support the learning that occurs in the Maker Community Guild Option for educational, professional development. Key Words: Makerspaces, Educational Professional Development, Experiential Learning, Constructivism, Constructionism, Tinkering, System Conveners, Sustaining Innovations
Article
The science of broadening participation explains how science thrives with appropriate frameworks for addressing complex issues. This article presents a developmental framework for equitable STEM scholar development, access, and opportunity. Few issues in academia are more complex than ensuring all scholars can thrive without unwarranted obstacles of intentional disruption or benign indifference. The Thrive Mosaic developmental framework coalesces the best elements of a scholar’s networks to support scholar development, advocacy, and self-care, while also working to forestall systemic marginalization and obstructionist practices. The framework uses a systems thinking approach where aspects of the “ecology of academia” important to scholar success are conceptualized as systems that can be adapted to benefit the scholar and support scholar activism. The goal is to mitigate environmental internal and external factors that impede scholar success. Thrive Mosaic is both a resource and a tool for realizing scholar thriving, particularly within privileged and noncollegial environments.
Conference Paper
In large part due to the highly prescribed nature of the typical school day for children, efforts to design new interactions with technology have often focused on less-structured after-school clubs and other out-of-school environments. We argue that while the school day imposes serious restrictions, school routines can and should be opportunistically leveraged by designers and by youth. Specifically, wearable activity tracking devices open some new avenues for opportunistic collection of and reflection on data from the school day. To demonstrate this, we present two cases from an elementary statistics classroom unit we designed that intentionally integrated wearable activity trackers and child-created data visualizations. The first case involves a group of students comparing favored recess activities to determine which was more physically demanding. The second case is of a student who took advantage of her knowledge of teachers' school day routines to test the reliability of a Fitbit activity tracker against a commercial mobile app.
Conference Paper
3D printing has 1 become an area of intense interest in many disciplines ranging from industry through education, humanitarian and innovation contexts to research. At the same time, technologies, materials, usages and appropriation are in constant flux. 3D printing is but one of the many facet of digital fabrication, the digitalization of more sectors, "Industry 4.0" and increasing community-based innovation and (open/commons-oriented) engineering practices. This workshop is intended to illustrate and discuss cases, positions, concepts and experiences related to such developments in digital fabrication, especially in 3D printing. We specifically look for contributions highlighting the role of digital fabrication and 3D printing for the common good and the education sector. This is in line with C&T's socio-technical focus, research suggesting the immense potential in digital fabrication and education as well as growing practices in using digital fabrication/3D printing in humanitarian efforts.
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