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Success and Failure of Innovation: A Literature Review.

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... AHP proves to be a practical approach for assessing the models with complex interdependent factors and provides a rigorous basis for addressing the problems involving both quantitative and qualitative factors [17] . AHP is a simple yet powerful tool that was first developed within the management science field over 20 years ago [18] . ...
... Categorizing into the TOE framework is very helpful in many simplified factors presented from the previous study. As the ground theory, Project SAPPHO [24] is probably the first study to analyze successful commercial innovation by comparing between successful and unsuccessful innovations; after the study, the dyadic comparisons between project successes and failures have become popular to discover principal discriminating factors of innovation commercialization [17,25] . The SAPPHO study found five main factors of commercially successful innovations, i.e., a better understanding of user needs, more marketing and publicity, work efficiently, use technology and scientific advice, and responsible individual. ...
... Lastly, Pan and Jang (2008) considered the TOE framework to examine the effect of the decision to adopt enterprise resource planning (ERP) in Taiwan's communications industry by identifying factors that distinguish adopters from non-adopters. To construct the TOE framework, the considering factors concerning the successful innovation commercialization were deliberately drawn from a set of related theories and prior research [17,23,35] . Those factors are described in the following sections. ...
... Based on the prior literature, the factors related to innovation failure are manifold, including the productbased, developer-based, consumer-based, management-based and the personal factors (Cozijnsen et al., 2000;van der Panne et al., 2003;Välikangas et al., 2009;Heidenreich & Spieth, 2013;Mueller & Shepherd, 2016;Guzzini et al., 2018;Ferreira et al., 2020). However, according to literature review, timing, collaboration, capabilities, and financial resources have received considerable attention in seeking the factors for failure. ...
... Timing: The timing-related factors have focused primarily on the development and finance of high-risk innovations. The studies report that in the idea conception stage, the lack of adequate market research, overconfidence, limited information for decision making, and internal financial constraints accompanied by explorative research and development increase the likelihood of innovation failure (van der Panne et al., 2003;Markovitch et al., 2015;D'Este et al., 2018;Garcia-Quevedo et al., 2018). ...
... Whereas overconfidence, inadequate market research and weak customer acceptance were common failure factors in the micro and small-sized firms, the lack of senior management support was a common factor in the medium-sized firms. Consistent with prior studies, some narrators argued that after an enthusiastic kick-off, the senior managers did not provide any practical support nor authority to innovation activities (Pinto & Mantel, 1990;van der Panne et al., 2003). ...
Article
While innovation is an attractive path, it is also a rocky path made up of numerous challenges, even failures. This study provides new knowledge for understanding innovation failure. It seeks answers to the question: What are the perceived factors of innovation failure in SMEs? Every individual who has experienced an innovation failure has a story to tell. Therefore, the research question of this study is answered based on these stories. The main data are collected through narratives produced by individuals who have been involved in the development of completely failed innovation initiatives. In addition, four expert interviews are conducted. The results demonstrate that the most common factor for innovation failure is the occurrence of several incidents during the innovation process that slowly contribute to complete failure. In addition, the results reveal three SME-typical narratives of failed innovations as narrators the Passionate Innovator, the Solo Innovator, and the Developer Innovator.
... For this purpose, various studies can be found in the academic literature which identify and empirically prove relevant factors for the successful development of innovations (Ernst, 2002;van der Panne et al., 2003). Many of the success factors identified can be traced back to fundamental concepts such as continuity, competence, and cooperation (3C). ...
... This study examines the influence of continuity, competence, and cooperation on the short-, mid-, and long-term innovation performance of a corporation. This approach is appropriate since several organizational, procedural, and cultural factors which impact innovation performance have been identified in the academic literature (Ernst, 2002;van der Panne et al., 2003), but the dependencies and interactions between these factors have often not been analyzed. For this reason, we have chosen a configurational and longitudinal approach to analyze a data panel that covers the innovation behavior of 220 ...
... Although the generation of innovation is requires momentous effort and is a very complex task, the literature reviews of Ernst (2002) and van der Panne et al. (2003) reveal numerous scientific studies have identified success factors driving the process, analyzed them, and empirically scrutinized their effectiveness. Those success factors examined often involve concepts such as continuity, competence, and/or cooperation. ...
Thesis
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Innovations have always been an essential factor for the long-term success of corporations. This is all the more true at times like the present, which is becoming increasingly dynamic and fast due to such effects as digitalization and globalization. However, as important as innovations are for the success of corporations, their systematic development is just as challenging. This fact can be demonstrated not least by numerous practical examples in which formerly successful corporations were unable to react appropriately to changing market and competitive conditions and consequently had to give up their market position. The challenges in the development of innovations can be traced back to different organizational conditions, which are necessary for the efficient exploitation of existing products on the one hand and the exploration of new innovations on the other. The scientific literature recommends, among other things, the separation of exploration and exploitation into different organizational units to meet the challenges mentioned above. In addition to the operational business units, which are usually responsible for the exploitation of existing products, it is advisable to establish innovation units, such as corporate incubators or corporate venture capital units, and to entrust them with the exploration of innovations. For a detailed examination of the current state of research on corporate incubators and corporate venture capital, two systematic literature analyses were carried out within the scope of this thesis. As a result, it was discovered that further research is needed, particularly concerning the organizational integration of such innovation units into the overall organization and the associated conflicts of objectives. To make an initial contribution to closing the research gap mentioned above, a further study of this work is devoted to the organizational integration of different innovation programs in an established corporation. This study differs from previous studies in that it takes an overarching perspective and considers the entire organization, including the innovation units, as a holistic innovation system. Such a corporate innovation system consists of at least three different types of innovation units in addition to the operational business units: exploration-oriented innovation units for the generation of disruptive innovations, exploitation-oriented innovation units for the further development of existing products and transformation-oriented innovation units for the transformation of the corporate culture. Such a system can ensure the systematic and sustainable generation of innovations, especially in the interaction of the various innovation units. In addition to the basic establishment of the innovation units mentioned above, however, appropriate organizational framework conditions are required to ensure that innovations can be developed successfully. The fourth study in this thesis is dedicated to the question of how continuity, competence and cooperation affect the innovation performance of corporations. It could be analyzed that the continuous implementation of innovation activities has the greatest positive effect on the innovation performance of enterprises. While cooperation, in combination with continuity, has a short- to medium-term impact on innovation performance, competence and continuity have a long-term effect on innovation performance. Cooperation and competence are complementary concepts in that cooperation should be used for short-term innovation activities, while competence should be used for the long-term sustainable development of innovations within the enterprise. As a result, this work addresses existing research gaps with regard to the integration of innovation units and the organizational structures of corporations and provides valuable insights and approaches for further research. For this purpose, it was necessary to link findings from the field of innovation management and corporate venturing with concepts of organizational theory. Through this connection, we have succeeded in gaining new scientific insights that previously could not be gained independently within the individual research streams. We are convinced that our findings on Corporate Innovation Systems and the effects of continuity, competence and cooperation on innovation performance have made an important scientific contribution. That is all the more true at a time when successful innovation is becoming increasingly important for corporations and a growing number of newly emerging innovation units can be observed in practice.
... It is widely acknowledged that innovation is critical to a company's economic success. Innovative businesses grow more quickly and profitably (see for example the econometric studies by Geroski et al., 1993; or Kleinknecht et al., 1997) [1]. If many businesses still refuse to innovate, it is due to a variety of risks and uncertainties that result in high failure rates. ...
... Previous involvement in innovative projects is beneficial to the firm's technological capabilities since it improves skills that are critical to the success of creative projects. As a result, businesses should seek out adventures that are similar to the firm's specific experiences in terms of technology, manufacturing, and marketing (Stuart & Abetti, 1987;Bessant, 1993) [1]. Furthermore, participation in initiatives that are similar to previous experi-ences provides for a significant reduction in time-to-market (Wind & Mahajan, 1988). ...
... d Raynor (2003) also argued that these three types of capabilities were subject to migration and change as organisations matured. The capabilities might be developed, out-sourced or acquired through M&A processes. The choice of approach might be flexible as long as it ensured the strongest match of the resources, processes and values with the task.Van der Panne et al. (2003) carried out an extensive literature review in which they explored 43 academic papers that were available by that time, pertaining to the success and failure of innovations.Van der Panne et al. (2003) noted that, despite broad consensus on the benefits of innovations, many organisations were reluctant to innovate owing to the high risks ...
... &A processes. The choice of approach might be flexible as long as it ensured the strongest match of the resources, processes and values with the task.Van der Panne et al. (2003) carried out an extensive literature review in which they explored 43 academic papers that were available by that time, pertaining to the success and failure of innovations.Van der Panne et al. (2003) noted that, despite broad consensus on the benefits of innovations, many organisations were reluctant to innovate owing to the high risks and uncertainties associated with this management process. Therefore, there was a strong need to systematise the factors and pre-conditions "behind success and (more often) failure of innovation". Van ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Innovations have become essential for all organisations in all industries because the organisational environment is undergoing extremely fast changes within the digital economy. The COVID-19 crisis accelerated these developments in the business environment, requiring organisations to adapt their internal processes to manage the VUCA demands of modern economy. This thesis was dedicated to exploring key factors and pre-conditions for successful development and implementation of process innovations through which organisations in the construction industry in Eastern Europe can improve their efficiency, effectiveness and competitiveness in order to preserve their long-term viability. In this inductive research, based on a social constructivist philosophical stance, a number of key success factors and pre-conditions were identified from various sources of literature relevant to the digital age. These factors and pre-conditions were grouped into fifteen broader categories based on a brief content analysis. The research proved that the factors and pre-conditions displayed significant differences in the degree to which they influenced the successful implementation of process innovations. Based on the qualitative research undertaken in the course of this study, application of the key success factors and pre-conditions identified during the meta-analysis was observed in the given economic sector. Based on data collected using in-depth, semi-structured interviews with top-ranking industry professionals, the importance of various success factors and pre-conditions that affect process innovations within the construction industry sector were described in the research. Three mediating success factors for implementing process innovations are addressed in this thesis. Managing practitioners are advised to use the findings of this study to ensure successful implementation of process innovations in the context of their own businesses.
... Indeed, pursuing innovation is risky, uncertain, and consumes resources with expected M. H. G. Schneider, J. Hofmeister & D. K. Kanbach 2250042-2 financial returns far from being guaranteed. Whilst innovation success increases organisational performance and growth (e.g., Panne et al., 2003), innovation failure can offer benefits for organisations when managed appropriately. Cannon and Edmondson (2005) argue that organisations should fail intelligently to improve their innovativeness (i.e., learning from innovation failures (e.g., Rhaiem and Amara, 2021). ...
... Recent research (e.g., Singh et al., 2020) calls for more research that combines qualitatively derived and quantitatively verified methods to build on richer datasets. Finally, research often highlights the roles of frontline employees (e.g., Cadwallader et al., 2010) and top management (e.g., Choi and Chang, 2009;Panne et al., 2003) in innovation implementation. This research fails to consider the role of middle managers, even though it falls to middle managers to turn top management's strategic vision into operative execution for employees (Hofmeister et al., 2022;Nonaka, 1988;Wooldridge et al., 2008). ...
Article
Ensuring that innovations are implemented organisation-wide remains a critical business challenge for organisations. This study identifies how organisations can improve the effectiveness of innovations and specifies the effects of innovation implementation antecedents and capabilities. By applying a mixed method approach, using data from 42 semi-structured interviews and 125 questionnaire participants, we develop a new framework for understanding the mechanisms that underlie and enhance effective innovation implementation. The results emphasise that achieving high and consistent use of innovations requires organisations to focus on organisational members and their individual characteristics, rather than on organisational design. Additionally, implementation leadership serves as a central mediator to explain the framework’s relationships. Furthermore, a middle management-driven approach that combines implementation leadership and dialogue facilitates effective implementation of innovation. In conclusion, our study contributes to innovation implementation research by presenting a framework to guide future research, while helping practitioners to implement innovations more effectively.
... co-creation) [6][7][8]. Despite the broad range of theoretical contributions [9][10][11] as well as consultancy groups reports (e.g. McKinsey) [12], showing how having a greater customer focus could lead firms to new advantages in terms of increased sales, customer retention rates, business performance, and higher return on investments [12]; firms in practice still struggle with many deficiencies when it comes to design and develop services. ...
... McKinsey) [12], showing how having a greater customer focus could lead firms to new advantages in terms of increased sales, customer retention rates, business performance, and higher return on investments [12]; firms in practice still struggle with many deficiencies when it comes to design and develop services. For instance, [11] argue that 60 percent of service innovations fail due to a lack of an appropriate human-centered strategy towards innovation. Similarly, authors such as [5,13] argue that services are generally underdesigned and inefficiently developed because companies limit themselves to simply identify and meet customers' needs rather than on design services with and by the customers. ...
Conference Paper
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A lack of measurement tools as well as a strategic and systematic approach for companies to achieve a high degree of human-centeredness is unknown in business and research discussions. This becomes an obstacle for companies when designing services, which are geared to improve humans’ lives. Based on the guidelines of Design Science Research (DSR), we address this gap by developing a human-centeredness Maturity Model (MM). The design of the MM is grounded in extant literature, semi-structured interviews as well as a focus group involving company representatives from the field of services, service design, and human-centered design. Results reveal a series of dimensions, capabilities, and stages indicating an evolutionary path towards maturity for companies to become truly human-centered. Becoming truly human-centered will allow firms to develop specific and targeted improvements initiatives, which could optimize resources deployment and thus, resulting in designing better services for the customers.
... Today, with an average life cycle of 3 years, one third of the business is up for auction every year. With a failure rate of innovations of at least 75% (Evanschinsky, Eisend, Calantone & Jiang, 2012;Van der Panne, van Beers & Kleinknecht, 2003), and a needed 10% yearly growth, it is clear that managers of highly successful companies do not necessarily know if the firm will exist at the end of the year! Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! ...
... Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! ( Van der Panne et al., 2003). Table 1 shows the percentage of a firm's turnover that has to be renewed each year and the consequences in the form of the size of the product development portfolio that is needed. ...
Article
Full-text available
This conceptual paper explores the phenomena of changing cost-structures and the implications for the volatility of capitalism and the possibility to manage firms in such a hostile environment and proposes future research. It also provides an explanation of why the relevance of accounting is lost, the so-called "relevance lost" debate (see among others Francis & Schipper, 1999). The changing cost-structures raises fundamental questions concerning the resulting volatility of capitalism and the management of firms in such an increasingly more volatile environment. In Philipson, Johansson & Scheley (2016), we raised the question if it was possible to "...to ride the dragon." Considering the importance of these phenomena, it is astonishing that we have not found any empirical research concerning them. They rest research questions, based on the author's almost 25 years of experience as a senior executive in Scandinavian industry.
... Today, with an average life cycle of 3 years, one third of the business is up for auction every year. With a failure rate of innovations of at least 75% (Evanschinsky, Eisend, Calantone & Jiang, 2012;Van der Panne, van Beers & Kleinknecht, 2003), and a needed 10% yearly growth, it is clear that managers of highly successful companies do not necessarily know if the firm will exist at the end of the year! Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! ...
... Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! (Van der Panne et al., 2003). Table 1 shows the percentage of a firm's turnover that has to be renewed each year and the consequences in the form of the size of the product development portfolio that is needed. ...
... With a failure rate of innovations of at least 100. (Evanschinsky, Eisend, Calantone & Jiang, 2012;Van der Panne, van Beers & Kleinknecht, 2003), and a needed 10% yearly growth, it is clear that managers of highly successful companies do not necessarily know if the firm will exist at the end of the year! Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! ...
... Since innovation is risky, the firm might need a product development portfolio that is as large as the current turnover, or even more! ( Van der Panne et al., 2003). Table 1 shows the percentage of a firm's turnover that has to be renewed each year and the consequences in the form of the size of the product development portfolio that is needed. ...
Article
Full-text available
This conceptual paper explores the phenomena of changing cost-structures and the implications for the volatility of capitalism and the possibility to manage firms in such a hostile environment and proposes future research. It also provides an explanation of why the relevance of accounting is lost, the so-called “relevance lost” debate (see among others Francis & Schipper, 1999). The changing cost-structures raises fundamental questions concerning the resulting volatility of capitalism and the management of firms in such an increasingly more volatile environment. In Philipson, Johansson & Scheley (2016), we raised the question if it was possible to “...to ride the dragon.” Considering the importance of these phenomena, it is astonishing that we have not found any empirical research concerning them. They rest research questions, based on the author’s almost 25 years of experience as a senior executive in Scandinavian industry.
... When selecting the literature sources for the success factors, only sources that fullfil the following three criteria were considered: (1) the study deal with success factors; (2) the study must consider several success factors to ensure reliability (van der Panne, van Beers, and Kleinknecht, 2003) and (3) the study is located in the area of project management, innovation management or entrepreneurship/intrapreneurship. ...
... In the area of innovation management, it is further harder to investigate influencing factors of process or organizational innovation than of product innovation (Spender et al., 2017). It is possibly because of the different forms of innovation that literature does not provide a holistic picture of success or failure factors of innovation projects (van der Panne, van Beers, and Kleinknecht, 2003). "While innovation performance can be measured through an analysis of patents, firms survival and economic performance pose difficulties linked to the transient nature of startups" (Spender et al., 2017). ...
Article
In recent years, established companies have made increasing use of intrapreneurship programs – often in combination with innovation activities – in order to combine the advantages of large companies with the speed of start-ups. However, it remains unclear under what conditions such intrapreneurship endeavours work best. This paper therefore examines the meaning of success in this context and investigates what factors influence the success of such programs. By using a mixed-methods approach that includes a comprehensive literature analysis, an interview study with twelve intrapreneurs from the Fiducia & GAD IT AG, and developed guidelines, the paper outlines the success factors of intrapreneurship programs. Furthermore, the 5 P’s (People, Program, Product, Process, and Place) of successful intrapreneurship programs are classified in a model that builds on the 3-horizons-model of innovation. This model enables recommendations to be given for managers regarding how to contribute to the success of intrapreneurship programs.
... As almost nobody was expecting the COVID-19 crisis, we simply did not know what to expect in terms of organisations' responses to it, nor what innovation would look like for different organisations. Further, in general, the vast majority of innovations are incremental rather than radical (Kahn, 2018), and many fail (van der Panne, van Beers & Kleinknecht, 2003). Therefore, in the research and in this report, we take a broad view of innovation as any change undertaken by an organisation during COVID-19 that is intended to maintain, adapt or enhance service delivery and/or operations. ...
Technical Report
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This report outlines findings from a project within the Centre for Social Impact’s (CSI’s) Building Back Better research program. The project was undertaken by a research team from all three CSI centres: Swinburne University of Technology (SUT), University of New South Wales (UNSW), and the University of Western Australia (UWA). Acknowledging the significant impact of COVID-19 on community services, the researchers sought to understand the ways in which organisations in the aged care, disability and emergency relief sectors had innovated during COVID-19; the learnings, practices and activities that they wanted to carry on beyond the pandemic period; and the factors required in order to do so. Note: A national report and three state-based reports are also available for download.
... The emergent and developing agricultural sector is also constrained by the lack of available land, water, and quality technical support services (South Africa National Treasury, 2003). It has been noted that the lack of an adequate understanding of people's needs and preferences is a crucial factor in the failure of innovations (Cooper, 1999;Van Der Panne et al., 2003). Understanding the challenges and opportunities for significant technology adoption is important as a technology preferred in one setting may be most inappropriate and even rejected in another (Norman, 2004;Norman 2004). ...
Thesis
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Small-scale agriculture has a vital role to play in the broader issue of food security. Land and water are two critical requirements for any farming, and with climate change, access to water is becoming even more of a concern. There is an ever-growing need to address the sustainable use of water for these farmers, especially in water-constrained urban areas. This design study was aimed at mitigating the irrigation issues that the farmers face, as mentioned above. The lack of accessible, affordable, and contextually appropriate irrigation technology has been a barrier encountered by most small-scale farmers. Limitation of resources and the need for affordable tooling and manufacturing drive the demand for low-cost product development. The high cost of initial setup, maintenance, and training for correct equipment use often deters farmers from venturing out to seek solutions for their problems. This calls for contextually appropriate innovations that allow for adoption by farmers. Open-source forums and platforms were utilized to develop electrical and physical prototypes that monitored the farmers' water use patterns. The incorporation of new technological advancements enabled the development of appropriate technology that meets the intended users' requirements, in this case, the farmers. Through a Human-Centered Design lens, the developmental process looked to pragmatism theories, research through the design, and appropriate technology to guide the study. This documented study is sectioned into the three phases of the Human-Centered Design. The hear phase analyzed existing literature framing the landscape of farming in South Africa; small-scale farming, in particular, concluding in the possible areas of problem mitigation. It then moved onto the Create stage, where the insights gained from the Hear chapter were implemented through extensive interviews and observations through inputs and participation from urban farmers to understand deeper problems that might be overlooked through a process of secondary research. This section also narrates the design. iv The final phase is the Deliver phase which tackles the installation and review of the kit by farmers and documents the various iterative stages of the design process after initial feedback. The final solution was delivered in kit format, and further design refinements have been recommended for future research.
... There is not a simple linear relationship between enterprise technological innovation and firm performance, and there are differences across different market environments and different subjects, because both opportunities and risks are brought by innovation. Through a literature review, Gerben found that only 20% of project innovations are feasible and effective [15], and 39% of innovation projects end in failure [16]. This means that one-third of enterprises' investments in innovation do not bring better development opportunities but entail a large amount of capital and resource loss, resulting in a reduction in firm performance [17]. ...
Article
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Technological innovation can restructure the production factors of enterprises, and it is an important factor for enterprises to meet market demand, improve competitiveness, form long-term competitive advantages and obtain sustainable development. This study focuses on the practical issue of the impact of technology innovation on firm performance. Taking 1166 listed companies in China from 2012 to 2020 as research samples, this study systematically investigates and reveals the impact of technological innovation on firm performance and its internal impact mechanism. The research shows that technological innovation significantly reduces firm performance, and that conclusion holds after an endogeneity test and a robustness test. The analysis of the impact mechanism shows that risk-taking is an important transmission path of corporate technological innovation affecting corporate performance and that technological innovation reduces firm performance by improving the risk-taking capacity. Finally, a heterogeneity test regarding the firm ownership shows that technological innovation has a significantly stronger negative impact on the performance of non-state-owned enterprises than on that of state-owned enterprises. The relevant government departments and market subjects should fully understand and give attention to the impact of enterprise technological innovation on firm performance and its mechanism, which has important practical significance for standardizing and strengthening enterprise R&D management, reducing the market and technological risks of firm technological innovation and perfecting modern enterprise systems. It is helpful for firms to form a sustainable technology innovation cycle development mode.
... The development and introduction of new carefully selected features-benefits combinations is so vital for companies that it has been defined as "life blood of corporate survival and growth" (Zahra & Covin, 1994). As a result, new product development (NPD) has generated great interest among practitioners and researchers across different disciplines (Baregheh et al., 2009), focusing on how to make sure that the product innovation process is successful (Cooper & Kleinschmidt, 1987;D'Attoma & Ieva, 2020;Ernst, 2002;Frattini et al., 2012;Lins et al., 2019;Van der Panne et al., 2003). ...
... Since multiple factors contribute to the success of projects, innovation is an important element to keep the projects on track by coping with the changing and intricate technological advancements (Butt, 2019). In this digital era, the degree to which a project is innovative affects the success of the project ( Van der Panne et al., 2003). Project employees with innovative work behaviour (IWB) can solve technical and operational issues rapidly, thus Knowledge hiding and innovative work behavior accelerating the speed and the overall success of the project (Atuahene-Gima, 2003). ...
Article
Purpose Numerous studies have linked the role of knowledge sharing with project success, while limited attention has been given to the consequences of knowledge hiding. The unwillingness of leaders to share information may cause the failure of assigned tasks, thus affecting the success of any project. Withholding information by leaders can potentially result in incomplete ideas, thus causing poor innovative work behaviour (IWB) among employees. Despite such knowledge-hiding behaviour, most employees continue working positively towards IWB. Design/methodology/approach In order to test these proposed hypotheses, data were collected from active information technology (IT) projects using purposive sampling technique. The purposive sampling method was selected to specifically focus on projects that require innovation. A total of 324 responses were considered for final analyses, which were collected in time lag. Findings The study outcomes amplified the important issue of knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders that adversely affected the IT project industry and how such behaviour led to failure as a result of poor IWB. Apparently, IWB intervened between knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders and project success. However, high curiosity among employees seemed to reduce the negative effects of knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders. Originality/value This study substantially adds to the leadership literature and holds immense importance for project professionals by drawing their attention to the neglected area causing project failure.
... Borins (1998) The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available on Emerald Insight at: https://www.emerald.com/insight/0951-3558.htm after being nominated or awarded. Van der Panne et al. (2003) revealed that only 20% of innovations survived. Pollitt et al. (2007) pointed out that approximately 68% of innovations could not be contacted after more than two years of being awarded. ...
Article
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Purpose - This study examines the critical factors contributing to the different conditions of innovation sustainability after a change in local political leadership. Design/methodology/approach - This study used a multiple case study approach and applied the critical incident technique (CIT) to collect and analyze data from four innovation cases in the two local governments of Indonesia. Findings - The results highlight that the sustainability condition of each innovation after the political regime change is determined by multiple critical factors. Research limitations/implications - First, the data collected through interviews may contain a memory bias. Second, this study was limited to local governments and did not consider innovation taxonomies. Practical implications - The study implies that in order to sustain innovation, public leaders must support innovation legitimacy as a new organizational structure; thus, it can be more durable in the long term. In addition, public leaders need to minimize innovation politicization by authorizing bureaucrats to autonomously manage innovation operationalization. Social implications - Public leaders need to pay careful attention to their innovation sustainability because a non-sustained policy can disappoint the individuals working for it, losing their trust and enthusiasm. This dissatisfaction could become a barrier to mobilizing support for the following policies. Originality/value - Innovation sustainability is a new theme that is overlooked in the public sector innovation literature. Therefore, investigations using different methods and contexts are required, as this study offers. This study also demonstrated the value of CIT in identifying critical factors affecting innovation sustainability in the context of political leadership change.
... Specialised research has reached a common conclusion that various features have an influence on the organisational modes of innovation activity. With regards to the success factors for affecting innovation, some studies consider the factors independent from one another (Sharma et al., 2019;Smith et al., 2019;Van der Panne et al., 2003;Zheng, 2010). In this paper, we argue that the factors are interrelated and co-dependent; therefore, innovation needs to be studied in a holistic manner. ...
... Specialised research has reached a common conclusion that various features have an influence on the organisational modes of innovation activity. With regards to the success factors for affecting innovation, some studies consider the factors independent from one another (Sharma et al., 2019;Smith et al., 2019;Van der Panne et al., 2003;Zheng, 2010). In this paper, we argue that the factors are interrelated and co-dependent; therefore, innovation needs to be studied in a holistic manner. ...
... High formalization includes established work routines and limited decisionmaking autonomy (Agarwal, 1993), which can impede essential elements of an entrepreneurial culture, for example, experimentation, risk-taking or exploration (Burns & Stalker, 1961;Menguc & Auh, 2010). Van der Panne, van Beers, and Kleinknecht (2003) found that a formalized structure counteracts the trial-error-approach that is important for BMI. Also, formalization is associated with a high level of bureaucracy (Menguc & Auh, 2010), which fosters rigidity and impedes creativity (Hartline, Maxham, & McKee, 2000). ...
Article
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Although research has shown that business model innovation (BMI) is an effective means to remain competitive in the digital age, many firms do not respond appropriately and often fail to exploit new digital opportunities. In this study, we adopt a microfoundational approach to understand the role and effects of dynamic capabilities (DCs) on BMI in the context of digitalization. Furthermore, we test how this relationship is influenced by contextual factors. Our results from a survey of German manufacturing firms demonstrate the importance of building strong DCs for effective BMI in the context of digitalization. We also highlight the advantages of an entrepreneurial leadership and mindset in this context. The study further suggests that environmental turbulence in the digital context acts as an antecedent to DCs and BMI, rather than moderating their relationship. While strategic factors indirectly affect BMI as antecedents of DCs, we found no evidence of an influence of the organizational structure.
... Taking risks is a part of innovating. The idea that the riskiness of innovation increases with increasing technology newness is well accepted in the innovation management literature (Cooper and Kleinschmidt, 1995;Van der Panne et al., 2003;Duhamel and Santi, 2012). In addition, greater technology newness is associated with greater uncertainty (Tatikonda and Rosenthal, 2000). ...
... Taking risks is a part of innovating. The idea that the riskiness of innovation increases with increasing technology newness is well accepted in the innovation management literature (Cooper and Kleinschmidt, 1995;Van der Panne et al., 2003;Duhamel and Santi, 2012). In addition, greater technology newness is associated with greater uncertainty (Tatikonda and Rosenthal, 2000). ...
... Innovation is widely recognised as a critical factor for organisation survival (van der Panne et al., 2003). Innovative companies are confirmed to be better in terms of both financial performance and the resilience level (Carvalho et al., 2016). ...
Conference Paper
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While there are many innovation management standards published during the last decade, only a few pieces of literature discussed their practical implication. Digital innovation, on the contrary, is a very active field for both scholars and practitioners. There is no well-defined framework to guide the transformation journey. Empirical cases show many digital products, processes or services are created as a result of innovation projects. Therefore, the guide for innovation management should be able to navigate the digital transformation journey. This article confirms the idea above by mapping digital transformation (DX) literature into the framework provided by ISO-56002 innovation management standard. Practitioners would benefit from this paper by having a standard framework to guide their transformation journey.
... Technological innovation in general must go through a long and high-risk process [17]. In addition, the success of an innovation is influenced by many factors, some of which are innovation management and market introduction timing [18]. Therefore, not all innovations carried out can end succesfully. ...
Article
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This study aims to determine the effect of environmental innovation on companies’ financial performance. The total sample used in this research is 275 publicly listed companies operating in China, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines for the period of 2012-2019. In constructing the analysis, this study uses balanced panel data and robust fixed effect model. The result suggests insignificant relationship between environmental innovation and companies’ financial performance in the short-term. While in the longer term, this study shows a significant relationship between environmental innovation and companies’ financial performance. However, there are inconsistencies still found in the relationship between the two variables due to negative and positive associations in the regression result. This is mainly because the innovation success can be affected by other factors such as the innovation management and the market introduction timing as well. Thus, future research needs to take those factors into account when trying to identify the impact of innovation on financial performance.
... However, innovating firms often fail to capture diversity in the demographics of consumers who determine this unintended variation in product usage. This phenomenon underlines the apparent surge in post-market failure and withdrawals (Carpenter et al., 2012;Van der Panne et al., 2003) as products become inefficient under these unanticipated conditions. In this regard, we argue that regulatory agencies assume prime importance in booting innovating firms to incorporate market diversity into their NPI design and development. ...
Article
Regulatory review of new product innovation (NPI) has come to dominate contemporary discourse on innovation management. However, there continue to be a lack of clarity on how normative and scientific logics of evaluation combine to influence the regulatory review process. To bring some much-needed clarity, we draw on the diverse literature streams on regulatory reviews and NPI to unpack how the regulatory review process may play out in practice. We then explicate four varieties of regulatory review concerns that frequently affect regulatory decisions: speed and delays, safety and efficacy, cost and uncertainty, and routines. We go further to present eight propositions regarding these concerns to extend our understanding on how they may constitutively influence regulators decisions in articulating the value of NPIs and their potential to shaping innovation trajectories. We conclude by outlining and highlighting rich opportunities for future research.
... Traditional innovation models are insufficient to explain innovation in small businesses, because most of them (e.g. Avlonitis, Kouremenos, & Tzokas, 1994;Crossan & Apaydin, 2010;Lawson & Samsom, 2001;Read, 2000;Smith M., Busi, Ball, & Van Der Meer, 2008;Tang, 1998;Van de Panne, Van Beers & Kleinknecht, 2003) are based on recursive theories which put more emphasis on the technological, financial, and recursive aspects of the innovation process (Glover, Champion, Daniels, & Boocock, 2016). ...
... The development and introduction of new carefully selected features-benefits combinations is so vital for companies that it has been defined as "life blood of corporate survival and growth" (Zahra and Covin, 1994). As a result, new product development (NPD) has generated great interest among practitioners and researchers across different disciplines (Baregheh et al., 2009), focusing on how to make sure that the product innovation process is successful (Cooper and Kleinschmidt, 1987;D'Attoma and Ieva, 2020;Ernst, 2002;Frattini et al., 2012;Lins et al., 2019;Van der Panne et al., 2003). ...
Article
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This paper replies to the call for more agile-stage-gate hybrid methods in the context of physical innovations. By showing how some of the characteristics of conventional linear stage-gate methods and of the agile approaches can be integrated, we propose and test a new form of hybrid method for the physical new product development process (NPD). Distinguishing itself from the conventional NPD methods and practices, biased towards alignments between companies and consumers as the key to market success, our method focuses on the innovation potential intrinsic to misalignments. Through a qualitative research applied in an existing European consortium of innovators, the present work guides companies in the systematic identification and exploration of misalignments between their designers and users. By identifying misalignments at specific level of the NPD process, our method provides companies with a deep analytical insight into how, where and why (mis)alignments between their designers' decisions and users’ demands might occur. Our method revealed to be a strategic learning and reflection tool to support companies in the proactive management of the identified misalignments, as informative, beneficial and inspirational aspects of the NPD process.
... Das Wissen der Akteure und dessen Veränderung und Anpassung rückt in den Mittelpunkt. Dies ist eine zentrale Voraussetzung für ein verbessertes Verständnis von Innovationsprozessen, vor allem, wenn man die Häufigkeit des Scheiterns von Innovationsprojekten und insbesondere von innovationsgetriebenen Unternehmensgründungen kennt (van der Panne et al. 2003). ...
Chapter
Die evolutorische Ökonomik setzt sich die Erklärung von dynamischen, überwiegend durch technologische und andere Innovationen verursachten Wirtschaftsprozessen zum Ziel. Theoretisch wurzelt sie in den Arbeiten von Joseph A. Schumpeter aus dem frühen 20. Jahrhundert, der den in der Volkswirtschaftslehre im Vordergrund stehenden Preiswettbewerb durch den Innovationswettbewerb ersetzt und dem passiven homo oeconomicus den umtriebigen Entrepreneur an die Seite gestellt hat. Durchsetzen konnte sich die moderne evolutorische Ökonomik seit den 1980er-Jahren und liefert heute mit dem Ansatz der Innovationssysteme, den Rahmen für die ökonomische Innovationsforschung und Innovationspolitik.
... Indeed, when ventures fail, founders often blame market timing, claiming their breakthrough products and services were simply "ahead of their time" or that the market took longer to grow than expected (Eisenhardt, 2013). Others point to lengthy delays in product development processes (Lester, 1998;Van der Panne et al., 2003) or the failure to secure appropriate levels of financing in a timely manner (Eniola & Entebang, 2015). In each of these cases, the perceived value of an entrepreneurial endeavor hinges on the timing of entrepreneurial action (or inaction) (Wood et al., 2021). ...
Article
In the field of entrepreneurship, the creation of future goods and services inextricably binds the fate of new ventures to the influence of time throughout the entrepreneurial process. In recent work, scholars have taken important steps to account for the unique role of time in theories of entrepreneurial action. Our research builds on these approaches by delving deeper into the interplay between entrepreneurs and the temporal contexts in which they act. Our primary contribution is to advance novel theory regarding the agentic practices enacted by entrepreneurs to address the constraining and enabling influences of temporal structures throughout the entrepreneurial process. Central to our approach is a re-conceptualization of time not simply as the medium of entrepreneurial agency, but its target. Extending and enhancing existing work, we posit six types of temporal manipulation: conversion, inversion, subversion, diversion, perversion, and reversion. We ground our framework in common business venturing practices, discussing the wide-ranging implications of how the manipulation of time provides novel means for entrepreneurs to mitigate uncertainty in their attempt to achieve desired outcomes.
... According to [8], with regards to the technologial viability of innovation in projects, there are four factors that might impact IT project success: organization culture, innovation experience, attributes of the R&D team and the organization's strategy towards innovation. A research article [9] describes how innovation can be used to drive IT projects mindfully. ...
Conference Paper
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The need for agile and agility mind-set has been established across various discussions around effective management of IT development projects. Software development teams continually express the constant pressure coming from the necessary adjustment to the ever-changing IT architecture and landscape; which in turn necessitates for innovation that can foster the evolution of approaches and methods to effectively manage and deliver successful IT projects. Existing literature suggest that the major aim of adopting Agile is to improve innovation across all functions of the business. Therefore, if innovation and agile mind-set are what can sustain the response into the ever-changing IT landscape, there should be some degree of interrelation between these concepts. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of innovation and presence of innovative efforts within organisations towards successful delivery of agile development projects. The study found that for agile projects to succeed there should be some degree of innovation that is consistent throughout the life of a project. In conclusion, organisations should look to adopt the open innovation model to seek and manage the undiscovered.
... When there are significant deviations, R&D activities becomes useless and could harm an organization in the long term (Brown & Svenson, 1988). Van der Panne et al. (2003) argued that heavy investment in R&D activities does not take into account any guarantee of successful innovation outcomes. In fact, they found evidence that organizations could experience a serious failure in their R&D investment, which could weaken their position in the marketplace in the future. ...
Article
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This is a conceptual paper discussing how to undertake innovation in an organization as a project, and the components of the structure and leadership style as factors that support the implementation of the project. It reviews previous research related to organizational, leadership and control theories. It focuses on introducing the role of leadership and control structures into innovation projects. The suggested structure to be adopted is a mixed combination of organic and mechanical structures. This article argues the importance of the existence of a control mechanism to regulate the project; this functions as a set of tools to control the dynamics of the organizational structure in the project. It also reveals transformational leadership as the most suitable leadership style to control and deliver a successful innovation project. At the end, this article proposes several propositions to be tested further in empirical work. Some discussions about optional research methods are also presented.
... There are many different factors that enable firms to innovate. Various literature reviews have attempted to categorize these determinants (e.g., Ahuja and Lampert 2001;Crossan and Apaydin 2010;Slater et al. 2014;van der Panne et al. 2003). Because we could not identify previous literature reviews on the determinants of innovation specifically in the pharmaceutical industry, we opted for the categorization approach of Crossan and Apaydin (2010) as our steppingstone, because theirs has been highly influential for subsequent research over the past decade and is not linked to one specific industry. ...
Article
Radical drug innovations are of great importance to pharmaceutical firms and public health. Understanding the determinants involved in successful radical drug innovations is key to increasing this type of output in the future. The objective of this review is to search the literature for key firm-level determinants of radical drug innovation. Following a systematic literature review approach, we considered more than 4100 peer-reviewed journal articles and PhD theses, of which we included 38 in the narrative synthesis. To guide the review, we use Crossan and Apaydin’s (J Manag Stud 47:1154–1191, 2010) model of firm-level determinants of innovation for the first time within the pharmaceutical industry, which is unique due to the risks, costs, and time frames associated with radical drug innovation. We focus on three groups of determinants: leadership, managerial levers, and business processes. We find the following to be particularly important for radical drug innovation: external knowledge sourcing (managerial lever); internal knowledge management (managerial lever); ability of top leaders to innovate, as determined by educational background and professional experience (leadership); and leaders’ focus on shaping innovation and performance cultures (leadership). We offer a conceptual framework of critical determinants of radical drug innovation and highlight managerial implications. We also discuss gaps in radical drug innovation research and provide suggestions for future study. Many of the findings discussed in this paper are contradictory because they rely on different definitions and measures, which inhibits our full and accurate understanding of radical drug innovation development. More research is needed to address untested measures of radical drug innovation.
... Several studies indicate that bank performance increase after the adoption of innovation (Chipeta & Muthinja, 2018;Lotto, 2019). It is often maintained that financial innovation is usually accompanied with uncertainty and a high probability of failure (Faleye, Kovacs, & Venkateswaran, 2014; Van der Panne, Van Beers, & Kleinkecht, 2003). A radical (Keizer & Halman, 2009;Koberg, Detienne, & Heppard, 2003) or breakthrough innovation (McDermott & Handfield, 2000; is usually characterized with a high degree of uncertainty. ...
Article
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Several studies dealing with the direct relationship between financial innovation and bank performance have reported mixed results. The risk management incurred by the bank, as a mediating variable in this relationship, has not been investigated by researchers. In this context, the present work contribution consists in highlighting the important role of risk management to explain the interaction between financial innovation characteristics and bank performance. The present work is conducted concerning a sample involving seven privately owned Tunisian banks, relevant to the period ranging from 2009 to 2018. The hierarchical multiple regressions analysis turns out to indicate the noticeable effect of risk management on the relationships binding financial innovation characteristics (the risk level, innovations' horizon and specificity) and banking performance. In fact, private Tunisian banks appear to respond positively to the banking products and service‐associated technological developments, in a bid to effectively manage bank risks and promote banking performance.
... Studies have also shown some adverse outcomes of BMI such as customers can show resistance when a company overhauls its business model because customers prefer incremental innovations (van der Panne et al., 2003). This is in line with Christensen (1997), who noted that radical or disruptive innovation may face resistance from customers. ...
Article
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Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to systematically analyze the literature on business model innovation by identifying its triggers, enablers, barriers, dimensions, outcomes and highlight avenues for future research. Design/methodology/approach-A systematic literature review of papers on business model innovation was conducted based on the recommendations of Tranfield et al. (2003) from 2000-2019. A total of 70 conceptual and empirical studies on business model innovation research spanning from 2000 to 2019 were analyzed based on different classification schemes. Findings-The systematic review approach of this paper offers a new perspective in understanding business model innovation, bridges the gap in the extant literature by providing consolidation regarding the triggers, enablers, barriers, dimensions and outcomes of business model innovation and indicating avenues for future research. Research limitations/implications-A review of literature on business model innovation carried out in this paper is expected to open up new horizons for future researchers to develop and empirically test frameworks related to business model innovation. The five themes identified to shed light on important aspects of business model innovation. These themes are expected to not only strengthen the theoretical foundations of business model innovation but also help practitioners develop and implement business model innovations in their organizations. In particular, the themes related to the enablers, barriers, triggers and outcomes of business model innovation can provide useful insights for practitioners. Originality/value-This study is the first of its kind that has provided consolidation regarding the triggers, enablers, barriers, dimensions and outcomes of business model innovation.
... Una cuarta implicación derivada de estos resultados es que, de acuerdo con Chassagnon y Haned (2015), los gerentes de las empresas manufactureras que son innovadoras tienen una mayor capacidad de reaccionar ante la dinámica del medioambiente competitivo de los negocios, aprovechando las nuevas oportunidades que ofrece el mercado. En este sentido, esta capacidad permite a los gerentes implementar un balance para mejorar significativamente tanto su nivel de rendimiento sustentable como económico (Van der Panne et al., 2003;Carrillo-Hermosilla et al., 2010;Triguero et al., 2013), ya que comúnmente la adopción e implementación de las actividades de la eco-innovación requieren de gerentes innovadores. Al mismo tiempo, algunos estudios han demostrado que el éxito de la ecoinnovación sirve como una motivación para que otras empresas estén dispuestas a seguir el mismo camino (e.g. ...
Article
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La demanda de productos que sean más amigables con el medioambiente y lapresión de consumidores, ONG’s y grupos ambientalistas, están orillando a las empresas manufactureras a la realización de cambios importantes, entre los más trascendentales está el desarrollo de actividades de colaboración con otras organizaciones con la finalidad de mejorar la innovación de sus productos, procesos y gestión (innovación abierta). Sin embargo, poco se sabe de la relación entre la innovación abierta, ecoinnovación y rendimiento empresarial, ya que son relativamente pocos los estudios publicados en la actual literatura que se han orientado en su análisis y discusión. Por ello, esta investigación tiene como objetivo principal llenar este vacío existente en la literatura y explorar la relación existente entre la innovación abierta, la eco-innovación y el rendimiento empresarial a través de una extensa revisión de la literatura. Asimismo, se distribuyó un cuestionario autoadministrado a una muestra de 460 empresas manufactureras de México, analizando el conjunto de datos mediante el análisis factorial confirmatorio y modelos de ecuaciones estructurales. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que la innovación abierta tiene efectos positivos significativos tanto en la eco-innovación como en el rendimiento empresarial de las empresas que integran la industria manufacturera. Se concluye que la innovación abierta tiene efectos positivos significativos tanto en la eco-innovación como en el rendimiento empresarial de las empresas que integran la industria manufacturera
... When innovators believe that failure is a bad thing they avoid taking risks, pushing their own boundaries of learning and creativity, and may inadvertently make errors that lead to more failures [22]. The creation of a work culture that promotes creative risk-taking and values the sharing of learning experience is a critical factor associated with innovation [16,30]. Unfortunately, failure is often perceived so negatively that many avoid taking risks for fear of failing, thus preventing positive learning benefits and advancement for individuals and society [23]. ...
Preprint
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The role of design in K-12 education has increased in recent years. We argue that many of these design experiences do not help develop important habits of mind associated with Human Centered Design (HCD). In this paper, we present an approach for developing higher-order thinking processes associated with HCD as part of embedded design practice - an approach for teaching design thinking to younger children using principles of cognitive apprenticeship. First, we identify fundamental design habits of mind, discuss why it is difficult for young learners to develop such habits, and then draw upon cognitive apprenticeship principles to propose a concrete approach for design education. Finally, we present an illustration of embedded design practice to show how the situated context offers opportunities for designers to learn more about the needs of young learners while providing learners with opportunities to learn more about design practices.
... Organizational innovation is viewed as a fundamental constituent of organizational survival and the manner in which it competes in today's increasingly global markets (Suliman and al-Shaikh, 2007. As explained "the basis of innovation is ideas and the people who develop, carry, react to, and modify ideas" (Van de Van 1986).The organization that innovates tap the latent creative potential of employees and provides them the necessary support and infrastructure to introduce new products and services in the market or to improve the existing quality of products (Van der Panne et al, 2003).Organizations and their employees must be persistently innovative and adaptive in order to maintain their survival and be successful in the long run (Jimenez, J.D. & Sanz, V.R 2011). According to Agarwal (2014), "One option for organizations to become more innovative is to encourage their employees to be innovative. ...
... Employees must be trained in the new processes, procedures and mindset that they must follow to be successful and to contribute to the company's vision for incremental improvement or Kaizen. The foundation of Kaizen and innovation is ideascreative ways of looking at your job and your workspace, with an eye toward reducing waste, eliminating steps that do not add value and creating new value (Van der Panne et al., 2004). In contrast to CI (or Kaizen), which is characterized by incremental steps, process innovation is characterized by fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes (O'Neill and Sohal, 1999). ...
Article
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover the significance of green supply chain management (GSCM) to study the impact lean practices, namely, Kaizen and innovation management practices on organizational sustainability. Design/methodology/approach The subject of green supply chains attracts a growing interest in academic and professional literature since 1990. Questionnaire survey and structured interviews (set of questions) among the industrial professionals and academicians of northern India region have been performed to ascertain the significance of GSCM toward organizational sustainability. Structural equation modeling, Cronbach’s alpha, z -test, correlation and t -test have been used to ascertain the significance of lean practices toward sustaining organization by taking the mediating effect of GSCM. Findings The results signify the negative potential of combined Kaizen, innovation management and government policies on environmental thinking through supply chain. The innovation management strategies and Kaizen individually has positive influence on environment supply chain but government policies should be improved to improve the positive impact on environmental thinking through supply chain by decreasing pollution. Economic performance, environmental performance and competitive performance are significantly improved by implementing Kaizen and innovation management through GSCM. Research limitations/implications The research is limited to northern India. Moreover, selection of industry and academic organizations has been done on convenient sampling technique. Originality/value The paper demonstrates the application of lean techniques, namely, Kaizen and innovation management practices, showing how it can bring real breakthroughs in organizational sustainability through GSCM.
... Although efforts have been made to characterize features of particular successful innovation environments, attempts to reproduce these critical success factors in other settings have mostly failed to deliver, as outcomes are unpredictable and contingent on particular forms and contexts of innovation [25]. Our study provides a starting point for those wishing to navigate this challenging area, providing insights into stimulating innovation in high-risk health care environments. ...
Article
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Background: Digital health innovations are being prioritized on international policy agendas in the hope that they will help to address the existing health system challenges. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the setup, design, facilities, and strategic priorities of leading United Kingdom and United States health care innovation centers to identify transferable lessons for accelerating their creation and maximizing their impact. Methods: We conducted qualitative case studies consisting of semistructured, audio-recorded interviews with decision makers and center staff in 6 innovation centers. We also conducted nonparticipant observations of meetings and center tours, where we took field notes. Qualitative data were analyzed initially within and then across cases facilitated by QSR International’s NVivo software. Results: The centers had different institutional arrangements, including university-associated institutes or innovation laboratories, business accelerators or incubators, and academic health science partnership models. We conducted interviews with 34 individuals, 1 group interview with 3 participants, and observations of 4 meetings. Although the centers differed significantly in relation to their mission, structure, and governance, we observed key common characteristics. These included high-level leadership support and incentives to engage in innovation activities, a clear mission to address identified gaps within their respective organizational and health system settings, physical spaces that facilitated networking through open-door policies, flat managerial structures characterized by new organizational roles for which boundary spanning was key, and a wider innovation ecosystem that was strategically and proactively engaged with the center facilitating external partnerships. Conclusions: Although innovation in health care settings is unpredictable, we offer insights that may help those establishing innovation centers. The key in this respect is the ability to support different kinds of innovations at different stages through adequate support structures, including the development of new career pathways.
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The purpose of this research was to provide an appropriate academic and practical guideline for understanding open innovation (OI) in new product development (NPD) among Thai small and medium enterprises (SMEs). However, only a few studies have demonstrated that OI is used by Food SMEs. Their OI generative mechanism (GM) remains poorly understood. To understand the role of OI in this change, specifically OI logics and practices in food SME’s NPD, and the Food-Machinery framework by Bigliardi and Galati (2013a) have been chosen to analyze 109 NPDs of 2 Thai food machinery SMEs using a critical realistic (CR) perspective. Five rounds of semi-structured interview and document review methods were utilized for data collection. This research identified evidence that dynamic capabilities (DCs) mobilized in OI NPD is the OI GM. The results also demonstrated the Food-Machinery Flexibility Model and its six distinctive patterns within the same model, were successfully implemented by the integration of 3 OI logics (i.e., coupled OI logic with outbound dominance, coupled OI logic with inbound dominance, and no OI logic) and 8 OI practices (i.e., employee involvement, outward IP licensing, customer involvement, outsourcing R&D, inward IP licensing, insourcing R&D, supplier involvement, and regulatory body involvement) to reveal the OI knowledge in empirical domain, and consequence the analysis of 9 DCs (i.e., sensing, seizing, inventive capacity, transformative capacity, innovative capacity, absorptive capacity, connective capacity, desorptive capacity, and legally compliance capacity) revealed the underlying OI GM in the real domain. The knowledge flows have been analyzed by focusing on food recipe development at two levels of the NPD process, namely laboratory scale and industrial scale. Finally, the identification of OI GM demonstrated the relationship between OI and DCs. The development of DCs can strengthen OI practice within the organization. They are mutually reinforcing each other. Six distinctive patterns within the same model demonstrated the ability of investigated food SMEs to develop their 14 mechanisms (DC sequences) to ensure the efficacious implementation of OI logics and practices in food NPDs, and flexibility to the nature of the collaborative strategy associated with each NPD. The results exposed Thai SMEs switching their business from generic food machinery companies to the innovation intermediary. The contribution of this research supported both academic’s view on OI literature; understanding OI GM through the OI logics, OI practices and associated DCs mechanisms in the NPD process, and food practitioner’s view by providing an appropriate 6 OI guidelines for the food innovation intermediary. The research had a limitation due to a comparison between 2 SMEs’ NPDs. Future research could benefit from exploring additional food SMEs.
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In markets having innovation-based competition, one of the fundamental problems is the high risk of failure in new innovation projects that generates negative effects on organization performance and related competitive advantage. This study here seeks to provide a general theoretical framework to clarify the concept of failure and related properties in organizational setting. The failure here is a set of errors, which in turn includes a number of faults. Failure is caused by the impossibility of the system to make advances towards the principal goal of the design intent in order to take advantage of important opportunities or to cope with environmental threats. The theoretical framework is applied in two main study cases of aerospace missions, given by: spacecraft Soyuz 1 in 1967 and STS-10/ Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003. Theoretical framework here can guide, when a failure occurs in innovation processes, R&D managers, designers, analysts, etc. to strengthen strategic management and communication in order to maintain the goals of organization in the right direction in turbulent environment.
Article
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Engineers of the future must be capable of working successfully in multidisciplinary teams. Consequently, to advance innovative endeavours, engineering education and training should be considered in economic policies. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of differences in innovation capabilities between engineering and non-engineering students. The research design is quantitative, using a questionnaire as the research instrument. The population were undergraduate students at a Malaysian university. Only 223 out of 370 respondents provided feedback within two weeks of data collection. 117 were non-engineering students, and the other 106 were engineering students. To measure the differences between the two groups of students, an inferential t-test was used. The Rasch analysis approach was applied to analyse the profiles of the students. The results showed that the innovation level of engineering students was greater than that of non-engineering students. Nonengineering students demonstrate marginally more (n=105, 47.09%) than engineering students (n=99, 44.39%) in “Very High Levels” of innovation. As a result, engineering education has grown and increased demand to efficiently train a diverse group of engineers for these challenges. Keywords: innovation; independent sample t test; engineering students;nonengineering students; Rasch analysis; profile
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Od dawna już nie jest przesadą powiedzieć, że gospodarka cyfrowa zmienia świat. Nie jest też przesadą twierdzić, że zmienia go w stopniu i tempie, w jakim nie miało to miejsca nigdy dotąd. Rozwój technologii teleinformatycznych jest nie tylko jednym z czynników o największym wpływie na sposób funkcjonowania biznesu, ale wywiera także istotny wpływ na globalne procesy ekonomiczne. Zarządzanie przedsiębiorstwem w gospodarce cyfrowej wymaga obecnie interdyscyplinarnego podejścia, które obok okresowego redefiniowania paradygmatów zarządzania, nakazuje monitorować i uwzględniać aktualny stan wiedzy w zakresie innowacyjności, technologii i zjawisk społecznych. Tym właśnie zagadnieniom poświęcona była, zorganizowana z inicjatywy Wydziału Zarządzania Politechniki Warszawskiej (WZ), konferencja DEMIST’16 – Digital Economy – Managing, Innovation, Society & Technology. Odbyła się ona 24 listopada 2016 r., w gościnnych salach Centrum Zarządzania Innowacjami i Transferem Technologii Politechniki Warszawskiej (CZIiTT), które było także współorganizatorem wydarzenia. Konferencja, której patronowało m. in. Ministerstwo Cyfryzacji oraz Prezes Urzędu Komunikacji Elektronicznej, zgromadziła ponad dwustu uczestników. Znaleźli się wśród nich przedstawiciele nauki (z 17 ośrodków naukowych), administracji, oraz biznesu. Efektem konferencji był szereg publikacji w czasopiśmie „Foundations of Management”, wydawanym przez WZ. Podczas rozmów pokonferencyjnych – obok wniosku o konieczności nadania konferencji cyklicznego charakteru – pojawiła się propozycja opracowania monografii, która zaprezentuje w spójny sposób najważniejsze – zdaniem autorów – zagadnienia dla gospodarki cyfrowej w 2016 r., w podziale na obszary tematyczne zbieżne z tematyką konferencji DEMIST’16. Na zaproszenie do publikacji odpowiedziało 19 autorów. Napisane przez nich rozdziały składają się na trzy podobszary tematyczne monografii: zarządzanie, społeczeństwo i technologie, oraz innowacje. Rozważania w zakresie zarządzania w gospodarce cyfrowej otwiera rozdział dra hab. Jacka Bendkowskiego, prof. Politechniki Śląskiej, poświęcony roli mediów społecznościowych w procesie uczenia się na stanowisku pracy. Jak zauważa autor – zmianom podlega obecnie paradygmat organizacyjnego uczenia się. W miejsce centralnie zaplanowanego staje się ono zdecentralizowane, charakteryzujące się samoorganizacją i dostosowane do indywidualnych potrzeb jednostek. Autor wskazuje znaczenie mediów społecznościowych dla procesu tej zmiany, także w kontekście efektywności działań indywidualnych i grupowych na stanowisku pracy. Kolejny rozdział, którego autorką jest prof. dr hab. Grażyna Gierszewska (WZ), dotyczy zagadnienia wspomagania zarządzania wiedzą we współczesnych organizacjach. W rozdziale autorka koncentruje się na takich metodach wspomagania zarządzania wiedzą, które określane są mianem miękkiego zarządzania. I chociaż nie wszystkie one wiążą się z wykorzystaniem technologii teleinformatycznych, to zaliczają się do dobrych praktyk gospodarczych, ważnych także z punktu widzenia przedsiębiorstw zdigitalizowanych. Omówione metody zostały zilustrowane interesującymi przykładami. W rozdziale trzecim – dr inż. Anna Rybak (Politechnika Częstochowska) prezentuje kolejne zagadnienie szczególnie istotne dla gospodarki cyfrowej z punktu widzenia zarządzania. Jest nim problem zaufania konsumenckiego do marki globalnej. Autorka wskazuje problemy, z jakimi muszą się zmierzyć osoby odpowiedzialne za kreowanie marki na rynku globalnym, a także trendy, które panują w tym obszarze (np. mass-customization). Interesujące zagadnienie stało się także przedmiotem rozważań w czwartym rodziale podobszaru tematycznego „Zarządzanie”. Autorki, którymi są dr inż. Olga Sobolewska (WZ) i dr inż. Małgorzata Waszkiewicz (WZ) zauważyły, że często poruszanym ostatnio tematem jest transfer wiedzy i innowacji z obszaru nauki do przedsiębiorstw. Partnerzy naukowi nierzadko stanowią część tymczasowych organizacji sieciowych. Żeby jednak móc spełniać swoje zadania, muszą adaptować się do nowych warunków współpracy sieciowej, co wymaga niejednokrotnie zmian dotychczasowych metod zarządzania. Podobszar tematyczny „Społeczeństwo i technologie” otwiera rozdział dr inż. Ewy Kempy (Politechnika Częstochowska). Autorka podjęła się omówienia sposobu wykorzystania technologii cyfrowych w innowacyjnych działaniach małych i średnich przedsiębiorstw. Co istotne – chodzi tu o takie działania, które uwzględniają także potrzeby i zachowania klientów (co jest obecnie jednym z kluczowych aspektów budowania wartości dla klienta w modelach biznesu). W rozdziale drugim dr inż. Anna Wallis (Politechnika Koszalińska) omówiła wpływ postępu w dziedzinie technologii cyfrowych na rynek usług. Dr inż. Katarzyna Lange-Sadzińska (Uniwersytet Łódzki), w rozdziale trzecim, przedstawiła wybrane aspekty podejmowania decyzji z zakresu informatyki w organizacji gospodarczej. Autorka podkreśla, że decyzje informatyczne powinny być podejmowane w kontekście celów firmy i jej potencjału. Treść rozdziału została wzbogacona o wyniki badań przeprowadzonych przez autorkę. Kolejny rozdział, którego autorem jest dr Radosław Wójtowicz (Uniwersytet Ekonomiczny we Wrocławiu), dotyczy zagadnienia zarządzania treścią i dokumentami związanymi z procesami realizowanymi przez organizację. Autor omawia wykorzystanie w tym celu systemów klasy Enterprise Content Management oraz omawia najistotniejsze aspekty prac wdrożeniowych, związanych z zastosowaniem tego typu systemów w przedsiębiorstwie. Istotnego i szeroko ostatnio dyskutowanego problemu bezpieczeństwa danych i usług w chmurze dotyczy piąty rozdział, którego autorem jest dr Artur Rot (Uniwersytet Ekonomiczny we Wrocławiu). W rozdziale przedstawione zostały modele chmur obliczeniowych oraz wskazane potencjalne korzyści i zagrożenia związane z ich użytkowaniem (w szczególności z perspektywy bezpieczeństwa danych i usług). Ostatni podobszar tematyczny – „Innowacje” – otwiera rozdział dra inż. Piotra Dzikowskiego (Uniwersytet Zielonogórski), w którym zaprezentowane są wyniki badań autora nad wpływem typu odbiorcy na aktywność innowacyjną przedsiębiorców działających w obszarze przemysłu średnio-wysokiej i wysokiej techniki. Zbliżonym tematem, ale w szerszym ujęciu, zajęła się autorka drugiego rozdziału – dr inż. Danuta Rojek (WZ). Zwraca ona uwagę, że rola innowacji urasta w warunkach współczesnej gospodarki cyfrowej do rangi czynnika o kluczowym znaczeniu rozwojowym i konkurencyjnym, tymczasem badania polskich przedsiębiorstw wskazują na ograniczoną aktywność w tym obszarze, co stanowi wyzwanie dla krajowej gospodarki. W tym kontekście bardzo interesujący jest kolejny rozdział autorstwa prof. dra hab. Vasyla Lypchuka oraz mgr Katarzyny Kiliańskiej (reprezentujących Politechnikę Świętokrzyską), mający charakter studium przypadku z rynku ukraińskiego i prezentujący innowacyjny model hurtowego rynku rolnego. Omówienia innego rodzaju innowacji technologicznej podjęli się zaś autorzy czwartego rozdziału: prof. dr hab. inż. Waldemar Izdebski (WZ), mgr inż. Piotr Kryś (WZ) oraz dr inż. Jacek Skudlarski (Szkoła Główna Gospodarstwa Wiejskiego). Przedmiotem ich rozważań było zastosowanie technologii RFID w systemach automatycznej identyfikacji. W rozdziale dokonano analizy literaturowej dotyczącej zasad funkcjonowania i skuteczności zastosowania technologii radiowej identyfikacji w logistycznych systemach automatycznej identyfikacji. Omówione zostały także zalety i wady technologii oraz przykładowe zastosowania w przemyśle. Ostatni, piąty rozdział napisany został przez grono autorów reprezentujących WZ: mgra inż. Michała Wiśniewskiego, dra inż. Cezarego Szweda oraz dr inż. Olgę Sobolewską. Rozdział ma charakter praktyczny, a omówiono w nim koncepcję metody zarządzania zgodnością procesów logistycznych w administracji publicznej z obowiązującymi aktami normatywnymi. Kluczem, wiążącym prezentowane zagadnienie z szeroko rozumianą gospodarką cyfrową, jest podejście procesowe, które stało się punktem wyjścia dla przypadku omówionego w rozdziale. Całość publikacji stanowi swoisty katalog powiązanych ze sobą zagadnień z zakresu gospodarki cyfrowej, o których często dyskutowano w 2016 roku. Wyrażam nadzieję, że Czytelnicy znajdą w tej publikacji inspirację i zachętę do dalszych badań, przede wszystkim zaś do wzięcia udziału w kolejnej edycji konferencji – tym razem pod nazwą DEMIST’17 (www.demist.eu), do czego – w imieniu komitetu organizacyjnego – serdecznie zapraszam.
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