Article

Aneurysmal hemorrhage in a pregnant patient with coarctation of aorta: An anesthetic challenge

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Abstract

A 25 years old female patient with pregnancy of 16 weeks (G2 P1), diagnosed to have distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm (DACA) with Hunt & Hess grade I, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and coexisting atretic type of aortic coarctation posted for aneurysmal clipping under general anesthesia is a challenge to anesthesiologists in perioperative period. Hypertensive surges in a pregnant patient may result in rupture of aneurysms. Mortality in the mothers with CoA has been reported to be in the range of 0 to 9%. Anesthetic management of a pregnancy with CoA and SAH has never been reported.

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