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As the gastritis is becoming a major health issue in now days. It is the common most condition and symptom associated with any kind of disease. Even though we have many allopathic drugs to treat the condition but it is not up to the mark. Whereas the condition is repetitive even though it is treated with different kinds of drugs with different drugs in different doses based on the patient condition. Inspite of the available treatment there are many adverse effects of those conventional drugs available for treating the condition based on its root of cause. To overcome those adverse effects treatment with herbal medicine is suggested and that too people are choosing the home remedies including small and available herbs in their day to day life. In such a case the treatment for the condition with a non-adverse drugs or medications including plant extracts which has been practised in earlier days is most preferable.The present review focus on the list of conventional drugs available in the market along with their serious adverse effects and also the list of medicinal plants which can be used as an alternative of synthetic drugs without any adverse effects.
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ISSN: 2319-6505
REVIEW: LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR GASTRITIS
Poojitha M*., Swarnalatha G and MeenakshiSundaram R
Sri Venkateswara College of Pharmacy, RVS Nagar, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh, 517127
A R T I C L E I N F O A B S T R A C T
As the gastritis is becoming a major health issue in now days. It is the common most
condition and symptom associated with any kind of disease. Even though we have many
allopathic drugs to treat the condition but it is not up to the mark. Whereas the condition is
repetitive even though it is treated with different kinds of drugs with different drugs in
different doses based on the patient condition. Inspite of the available treatment there are
many adverse effects of those conventional drugs available for treating the condition based
on its root of cause. To overcome those adverse effects treatment with herbal medicine is
suggested and that too people are choosing the home remedies including small and
available herbs in their day to day life. In such a case the treatment for the condition with a
non-adverse drugs or medications including plant extracts which has been practised in
earlier days is most preferable.Thepresent review focus on the list of conventional drugs
available in the market along with their serious adverse effects and also the list of
medicinal plants which can be used as an alternative of synthetic drugs without any adverse
effects.
INTRODUCTION
Gastritis is considered as the most common digestive system
disorder. This is defined as the discomfort of the digestive
system occurred due to the eruption of stomach mucosa.
Peptic ulcer affects approximately 10 % of the world’s
population [1].
The evidenced causes of gastritis are
Imbalance between protective and aggressive
mechanisms of stomach (acid-pepsin, leukotriene
and reactive oxygen species).
Excessiveadministration of NSAIDs (non-steroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs) and alcohol.
Infectionof Helicobacter pylori and
Emotionalstress.
The available therapy for treating gastric ulcers includes
either control of the Helicobacter pylori or the control of the
H+/K+-ATPase pump that can decrease the acid secretion, as
well as the damage to mucosa. Many medications used for the
treatment of this disease are not completely effective butin
turn produces many adverse effects. However the prolonged
usage of the available drugs may lead to series of adverse
effects like thrombocytopenia, Hepato toxicity,
Nephrotoxocity and impotency [2].
Conventional drugs used for the treatment of ulcer and their
ADR’s
To overcome these adverse effects the alternative treatment
method that can be chosen is usage of natural treatment with
the help of medicinal plants that can reduce or overcome the
adverse effects caused by the available allopathic medicine.
Hence the extracts of medicinal plants are considered as
important sources of new molecules that have shown
promising results in treating gastritis[27,28].
It is evident that the extract of Medicinal plants shows
significant reduction in ulcer scores and index caused by the
inducing agents, where as It is also proven that antioxidant
potential of the medicinal plants also helps for exhibiting the
antiulcer activity which is due to the presence of flavonoids,
gums, tannins, Saponins and oleoresins in different parts of
plants[29, 30].
Such medicinal plants that have antiulcer and Gastro
protective activity that are reported till now are listed
below.(Table2,3)
Summary
The present review has demonstrated the plants that have the
efficacy to treat gastric ulcer that is caused due to different
causative factors like H.Pylori, proton pump inhibitors,
aspirin, indomethacin, alcohol etc. Manyplants have been
screened in both invitro and invivo conditions to check the
efficacy of medicinal plants on gastric ulcer as an alternative
for the available marketed medicines. Further research has to
be carried out to separate the active Phyto chemical
constituent that is responsible for the activity in order to valid
the scientific and medicinal uses of plants.
Available Online at http://journalijcar.org
International Journal
of Current Advanced
Research
Article History:
Received 15th September, 2016
Received in revised form 7thOctober, 2016
Accepted 16th November, 2016
Published online 28th December, 2016
© Copy Right, Research Alert, 2016, Academic Journals. All rights reserved.
REVIEW ARTICLE
ISSN: 2319 - 6475
Key words:
Gastro protective, Synthetic drug list, Adverse
effects, Medicinal plants
International Journal of Current Advanced Research
Vol 5, Issue 12, pp 1570-1575, December 2016
International Journal of Current Advanced Research
S.No. Drug
01 Cimetidine
02 Ranitidine
03 Famotidine
04 Roxatidine
05 Omeprazole
Proton pump inhibitors
06 Lansoprazole
Proton pump inhibitors
07 Rabeprazole
Proton pump inhibitors
08 Esomeprazole
Proton pump inhibitors
09 Pirenzepine
10 Propantheline
11 Oxyphenonium
12 Misoprostol
Prostaglandin analogue
13 Sodium bicarbonate
14 Sodium citrate
15 Magnesium Hydroxide
Antacid (nonsystemic)
16 Magnesium trisilicate
Antacid (nonsystemic)
17 Aluminium hydroxide gel
Antacid
18 Magaldrate
Antacid (nonsystemic)
19 Sucralfate
20 Colloidalbismuthsubcitrate
21 Amoxicillin
22 Clarithromycin
23 Metronidazole
24 Tinidazole
25 Tetracycline
Table 2
Family of Plant Plant Name
Part & Extract
Acanthaceae Acanthus ilicifolius
Liliaceae Aloe vera
Combretaceae Anogeissuslatifolia
Acanthaceae
Andrographispaniculata
Convolvulaceae Argyreiaspeciosa
Leguminoseae
Bauhinia purpurea Linn
Cucurbitaceae Benincasahispida
Beriberidaceae Berberis vulgaris
Burseraceae Boswellia serrate
Apocynaceae Calotropisprocera
Lecythidaceae Careyaarborea
Leaf
Apiaceae Centellaasiatica
International Journal of Current Advanced Research
Vol 5, Issue 12, pp 1570-
1575
1571
Fig 1 Pathogenesis of peptic ulcer
Table 1
List of conventional drugs with adverse effects
Category Adverse Effects
H
2
antihistamines
Bradycardia, impotency
H
2
antihistamines
Constipation, Dizziness
H
2
antihistamines
Mood changes, Dry mouth, Head ache
H2 antihistamines
Constipation, visual disturbances, Fast heart rate, increased
liver enzyme activity
Proton pump inhibitors
Leucopenia, Hepatic dysfunction
Proton pump inhibitors
Difficulty in breathing, seizures
Proton pump inhibitors
Head ache, abdominal pain, Diarrhoea
Proton pump inhibitors
Muscle cramps, Muscle weakness, Nausea
Anticholinergics
Dry mouth, Blurred vision
Anticholinergics
Nervousness, Bloating, Decreased sense of taste
Anticholinergics
Urinary retention, abnormal heart rate
Prostaglandin analogue
Stomach cramps, Dehydration
Antacid (systemic)
Herat burn, Indigestion
Antacid (systemic) Muscle twitching, Shallow
breathing, Weight gain
Antacid (nonsystemic)
Tightness in chest, Slow reflexes, Loss of appetite
Antacid (nonsystemic)
Constipation , Diarrhoea
Antacid
(nonsystemic)
Constipation Loss of appetite (Adverse effects are very rare)
Antacid (nonsystemic)
Severe allergic reactions, tightness in chest, vomiting, tarry
stools, Slow reflexes
Ulcer protective Itching, Insomnia
[23, 24]
Ulcer protective
Skin rashes, Trouble in breathing
Anti-H-Pyloridrugs
Vaginal itching, stomach pain, hairy tongue
Anti-H-Pyloridrugs Insomnia, mild itching or rashes,
Unpleasant taste
Anti-H-Pyloridrugs
Skin rashes, Trouble in breathing
Anti-H-Pyloridrugs
Vaginal itching/discharge, bitter taste in mouth
Anti-H-Pyloridrugs
Sores or swelling in rectal
region, White patches on lips and
inside the mouth, mild nausea, Swollen tongue, difficulty in
swallowing[27]
List of plants with gastro protective and other beneficial effects
Part & Extract
Other beneficial effects
Leaf
$
Asthma, Rheumatism.
Leaf+
Anti
-
inflammatory, mucus stimulatory, antioxidant potential,
anti-ulcer.
Leaf
@,*
Potent antioxidant activity.
Bark
@,*
Antioxidantactivity
Leaf
-
Nervous disorders, diabetes and ulcer
Leaf
$
Anti-inflammatory agent
Fruits #, $
Used to treat Liver disorders, pyrexia, kidney problems, and
nervous disorders.
Fruit, Seeds
@
Antioxidant
Bark
#,@
Antioxidant activity, antisecretory activity
Bark
$
Purgative, ulcer and stomachache
Leaf
* and stem bark * Antibacterialand free radical
scavenging potential
Leaf $ Psychiatricdisorders, melena and kidney
infections
1575
, December 2016
Bradycardia, impotency[3]
Constipation, Dizziness[4, 5]
Mood changes, Dry mouth, Head ache[6]
Constipation, visual disturbances, Fast heart rate, increased
liver enzyme activity
[7, 8]
Leucopenia, Hepatic dysfunction[9]
Difficulty in breathing, seizures[10]
Head ache, abdominal pain, Diarrhoea[11,12]
Muscle cramps, Muscle weakness, Nausea[13]
Dry mouth, Blurred vision[14, 15]
Nervousness, Bloating, Decreased sense of taste[16]
Urinary retention, abnormal heart rate[17]
Stomach cramps, Dehydration[18,19]
Herat burn, Indigestion[20]
breathing, Weight gain[20]
Tightness in chest, Slow reflexes, Loss of appetite[21]
Constipation , Diarrhoea[21, 22]
Constipation Loss of appetite (Adverse effects are very rare)[22]
Severe allergic reactions, tightness in chest, vomiting, tarry
stools, Slow reflexes
[23]
[23, 24]
Skin rashes, Trouble in breathing[24]
Vaginal itching, stomach pain, hairy tongue[24]
Unpleasant taste[24, 25]
Skin rashes, Trouble in breathing[25]
Vaginal itching/discharge, bitter taste in mouth[25, 26]
region, White patches on lips and
inside the mouth, mild nausea, Swollen tongue, difficulty in
List of plants with gastro protective and other beneficial effects
Reference
30,31
inflammatory, mucus stimulatory, antioxidant potential,
32
33
34
Nervous disorders, diabetes and ulcer
35,36
37
Used to treat Liver disorders, pyrexia, kidney problems, and
38
39
Antioxidant activity, antisecretory activity
40,41
41
42
infections
43
International Journal of Current Advanced Research Vol 5, Issue 12, pp 1570-1575, December 2016
1572
Acknowledgements
The authors thank Dr R Venkataswami, chairman and R.
Sreenivas, vice chairman of Sri Venkateswara College of
Pharmacy , Chittoor , and also we express our thanks to DST,
New Delhi, India for their encouragement and one of the
author express thanks to UGC, India for financial assistance.
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*
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Apocynaceae Cynanchumauriculatum Root
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Annonaceae Enantiachlorantha
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@
Malaria, Gastroprotective
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Cactus Ficusindica Leaf
*
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Euphorbiaceae Jatrophaisabelli Rhizome
*
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Calophyllaceae Kielmeyeracoriacea Roots
^
Gastroprotective
74
Verbenaceae Lippiasidoides Leaf
$
Antimicrobials, gastroprotective
75
Celastraceae Maytenusilicifolia
Leaf
@
Anticancer, gastroprotective
76
Rhizophoraceae Rhizophoramangle
Bark
@
Antioxidants, antiulcer 77
Lamiaceae Salvia officinalis
Leaf
*,^
Antispasmodic, Antiulcer
78
Solanaceae Solanumnigrum
Aerial parts
$
Antipyretic, antiulcer
79
Lamiaceae Stachyslavandulifolia Flower
@
Anxiolytic, antiulcer
80
Loganiaceae Strychnospseudoquina
Leaf
$
Hypoglycemic effect, antiulcer 81
Apocynaceae Tabernaemontanadivaricata
Flower
$
Anthelminthic, antiulcer 82
Combretaceae Terminaliaarjuna Bark
$
Heart diseases, Anti uclers,
83
Apocynaceae Voacangaafricana
Fruit
*
Anxiety, Gastroprotective
84
*indicates ethanolic extract, # indicates petroleum ether extract, @ indicates aq ueous extract, $ indicates methanolic extract, ^ indicates Hydro-ethanolic extract.
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