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The market for 'Delebs' (dead celebrities): A revenue analysis

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Abstract

Dead celebrities ('Delebs') are a large and growing market. According to some estimates, this market generates US$2.25 billion in annual revenues (CBC, 2013; Kirsta, 2012). Delebs are now so commonplace that since 2001, Forbes have produced an annual ranking of the top earners among these dead celebrities. In this paper, we examine this market and do the following. First, we define some key terms that are used in this paper. Following this, we briefly look at how the marketing of Delebs is different from the marketing of Celebs. Next, we look at some typical uses that Delebs are put to and the revenue streams they generate for Deleb stakeholders. We conclude with some key principles learned, look at some limitations of this paper and suggest future directions for Deleb research.

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