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Introduction: Vitamin D deficiency has shown a broad array of non skeletal diseases in recent years. It is supposed to be a key player in the pathogenesis of these metabolic diseases. Its deficiency has also been shown to be assorted with hypothyroidism with indecisive results. We therefore under took the present study to evaluate the association between vitamin D deficiencies in Hypothyroidism in a population of central Nepal. Materials and methods: A total of 100 healthy individuals including 42 females and 58 males, where 100 hypothyroid patients including 20 males and 80 females were included in the study. Levels of Vitamin D, Thyroid function test (FT3, FT4, and TSH), Thyroperoxidase Antibody (Anti-TPO) was tested by electrochemiluminescence method and Calcium level was determined in accent 200 (PZ Cormay S.A, Poland), in Department of Immune serology and Biochemistry of United Reference Laboratory, Pokhara, Nepal. Statistical Analysis was done by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 20.0. Results: The mean age of the study subjects was 43 ±15 years (range 18-83) and 43 ±14(range 20-87) years for control group with no statistical significant difference, P= 0.933. The results of mean comparison of thyroid function tests and Vit.D between the two groups were found statistically significant different. The percentage of abnormal results comparison within study group for male and female was found to be statistically significant in only for TSH (80% and 80%, P=0.026). Correlations between VitD and thyroid function test indicate that; for male there was a negative correlation of VitD with all thyroid functions tests, which was not statistically significant. For female the results indicate there was only a positive correlationbetween (Vit. D level and FT4) which was statistically significant (r =0.226, n = 80, P = 0.044). Conclusion: The study indicates the Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in hypothyroid patients, which suggests that they need routine testing and supplementation for the same.
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Objective: Vitamin D is an important component of calcium and phosphate metabolism, ensuring, with PTH and FGF23, adequate serum concentrations of these two analytes for optimal cell function and bone mineralisation. Despite a surge of interest in vitamin D physiology over the last decade, a single threshold for deficiency remains uncertain in functional terms, and it is clear that correlation between serum concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D and disease outcomes is very poor at the level of the individual. In this review, we describe the physiology of vitamin D, its potential associations with disease, and relate, in detail, the epidemiology of vitamin D status across populations worldwide. Design: Through a comprehensive literature review, we identified relevant studies from Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, North America, Latin America, and Oceania. Results: Although rickets and osteomalacia are established potential consequences of vitamin D deficiency, evidence for low levels of vitamin D as a cause of the multitude of other health outcomes with which they have been linked is lacking. We observed geographical differences in serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations, which may be partly, but not wholly, explained by factors such as sunlight exposure, skin pigmentation, skin coverage, dietary choices, supplements, adiposity, malabsorption, disease, demographics and lifestyle. Conclusion: We conclude that low serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D appear common across the globe; the relevance of this observation to human health remains to be elucidated.