Conference Paper

Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainable Business Practices: A Study of the Impact of Relationship between CSR & Sustainability

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to show that there exists a positive correlation between Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives and adoption of sustainable business solutions. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper surveyed top level managers and business experts of a sample of companies, representing a wide array of sectors and industries. Findings: The study finds that there is a positive correlation between CSR policies and adoption of sustainable business practices. Managerial Implications: As CSR improves the organizations performance, this study will be beneficial in terms of building professional image as well as enhance its societal roles & responsibilities. Scope for future work/research limitations: The study focuses on the roles and duties performed by the top notch companies thereby, restricting CSR practices of lower and middlelevel bodies. Future research should expand its area of study and include all the levels.

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... In other words, CSR can ensure that stakeholders' perceptions are not influenced negatively by activities that they might deem unsustainable (Palazzo and Richter, 2005;Yoon et al., 2006). Saha and Dahiya (2015) show that there is a positive correlation between CSR policies and the adoption of sustainable business practices. In addition, Watson (2015) tends to assume organizations that have good SP are likely to have high levels of CSR disclosure. ...
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  • D S Siegel
  • P M Wright
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