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... Un efecto de dicho modelo es la expansión de áreas sembradas en cultivos como caña de azúcar, palma africana, trigo, cacao, maíz, entre otros, a nivel mundial (Mintz 1996). Su materialidad evidencia conflictos ambientales (Martínez-Alier 2004), a partir de los cuales es posible demostrar relaciones asimétricas de poder (Castro 2013) a través de los modos de agenciamiento humano que se disputan, espacial y temporalmente, lugares, localizaciones, agua, suelo, entre otros elementos. ...
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Se analizan los conflictos espaciales de dos humedales del departamento del Valle del Cauca entre mediados del siglo XX y principios del siglo XXI, bajo un contexto de transformación producido por: 1) agentes sociales vinculados al agronegocio de la caña de azúcar, 2) el Estado y sus políticas neoliberales y, por último, 3) las comunidades locales que soportan el poder ejercido por los dos primeros. Se parte de la teoría de la producción social del espacio de Lefebvre para descubrir asimetrías en las relaciones de poder entre estos tres agentes. Los resultados muestran injusticias espaciales producto de ellas. De este modo, se aportan argumentos teóricos y empíricos como base de reflexión para las comunidades locales y la comunidad científica respecto a los estudios ambientales y conservación de humedales. Palabras clave: conflictos espaciales, relaciones de poder, producción social del espacio, humedales y agronegocio de la caña de azúcar We analyze spatial conflicts in two wetlands in the Department of Valle del Cauca between the mid-20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. These conflicts developed within a context of transformation produced by: 1) social agents linked to sugarcane agribusiness; 2) the State and its neoliberal policies and 3) the local communities that resist the power exercised by the first two. We use Lefebvre's theory of social production of space to reveal asymmetries in the power relations between these three agents, and show spatial injustices produced by these asymmetries. Theoretical and empirical arguments are provided as a basis for critical reflection by local communities and the scientific community regarding environmental studies and wetland conservation. Keywords: social production of space, power, spatial conflicts, wetlands, sugar.
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Revisión de las principales ideas en discusión sobre el Buen Vivir. No se pretende defender una única definición del Buen Vivir y como se verá en la revisión, no es posible ofrecer una que sea aplicable a todos los casos. El Buen Vivir en este momento está germinando en diversas posturas en distintos países y desde diferentes actores sociales, que es un concepto en construcción, y que necesariamente debe ajustarse a cada circunstancia social y ambiental.
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