ArticlePDF Available

Generische Revision der amerikanischen Zygaenidae (Insecta, Lepidoptera) mit Beschreibung neuer Genera und Arten (Insecta: Lepidoptera) (Text)

Authors:

Abstract

This is the first volume(text volume) of two of a generic revision of the American Zyganidae Lattreille, 1809. Most of the availbale type material was checked. 5 new genera and 24 new seocies are described and 137 taxonomical and nomenclatorical changes have been done.The main characters and their variability and value for taxonomical, systematical and phylogenetical studies are discussed. A checklist for all described taxa and a key to the genera is given. Moreover, new information on the biology, genitalia morphology and wingscale ultrastrucutre is provided.
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
A survey on the taxa of the statices-group in the genus Procris F. (Lepidoptera, Zygaenidae) is given in the present paper. It is shown that the present classification of this group is unsatisfactory since it does not agree with the known facts of the evolution of the group. New data on the taxonomy, the variability of some characteristics in genital structures and the morphology of the antenna and other features, on hybrid populations, the larval biology and breeding experiments are given. The importance of these characters in the evolution of the statices-group is discussed in detail. One species and 6 subspecies are considered to be synonyms.
Article
Full-text available
The biology and the early stages of Jordanita (Solaniterna) subsolana (Staudinger, 1862) is summarised in ths paper. Cirsium eriophorum is reported for the first time as a larval host-plant from the Alps in Südtirol (Alto Adige) in Italy. The feeding marks of the larva of J. subsolana are compared with the feeding marks of the larvae of Depressaria carduella and Calicyphora nephelodactyla that use the same larval host-plant.
Article
The western grape leaf skeletonizer, native to the southwestern states and northern Mexico, was first found in San Diego County in 1941 and very soon thereafter demonstrated a capacity to cause serious crop losses in the vineyards of that county. A biological control program was started in 1950 as a part of a comprehensive plan to control existing infestations and to prevent their spread to the more important commercial grape-growing areas to the north. Exploration for natural enemies was conducted during 1950 to 1952 and covered the known area of distribution of the pest in the Southwest and Mexico, as well as that of related species in the Atlantic Coast States from New York to Florida. Two insect parasites of the larvae and a virus disease were established in San Diego County as a result of importations from Arizona. These have been highly effective in reducing existing infestations to a low level, with only occasional short-lived outbreaks in semicommercial and back-yard plantings. They have also aided in preventing spread of the pest.