Conference Paper

A framework for writing learning agreements

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Abstract

Active learning is a popular concept for motivating learning. Learning agreements are one strategy towards this goal. They can be used to aid the students to take ownership of their learning and in becoming more active in a course. Learning Agreements are especially useful tools for scaffolding learning in courses with a focus on developing the professional competencies of students, such as in Open Ended Group Projects, Work Integrated Learning or other authentic learning contexts. Such educational contexts are complex and we have found it necessary to scaffold student learning using agreements based on professional competencies. This has led to a pedagogical framework, which has found successful application in a number of contexts. This framework has been built based on discussions with students, and has involved the development of a supporting wiki which contains descriptions of the different professional competencies involved in the learning agreement. The IT based framework has been iteratively developed together with the students taking the course in the fall of 2015. The development and assessment of this framework is contrasted in the context of two courses using learning agreements, one (in Sweden) with a focus on development of professional competencies and the other (in New Zealand) addressing a mix of professional competencies and subject knowledge in a work integrated learning setting.

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... As a result of the insights we gained in this research we commenced a series of reforms in our degree programme curricula [11]- [14]. The implementation of these reforms included restructuring several courses to provide a clearer focus on developing skills that had previously been under emphasised. ...
... The elements of the design process are depicted in Figure 1. Our empirical data consists of a detailed case study and also analyses of reflections gathered during several instances of two global software engineering [11], [14], [18] courses that have been offered at our institution over the past decade. ...
... The archetype method is used in the subsequent course, 1DT012 -IT and Society 2 , and it utilises character sheets developed based on persona stereotypes [14], [20]. The IT and Society course is a collaboration between Uppsala University, Sweden and Gannon University and Rose Hulman Institute of Technology, both in the USA. ...
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... In the beginning of the course, students can be encouraged to write down an individual learning agreement [38], assign goals for technical skills, soft skills, or attitudes, and reflect during and after the course on their progression. It needs to be said that tracing the progression of technical skills is much easier than teamwork skills and attitudes like approaching conflict situations or failure, so students are likely to need the teacher's support with the latter [38]. ...
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... Throughout this report, we emphasize the importance of learning how to learn. For insight into this concept, see [11]. ...
... This is important work for those of us who proudly state the graduate attributes that our students are meant to possess on completion of their degrees. Often these attributes are expressed in terms of broad competences such as "learning how to learn" [8]. Competences have been expressed in Ref. [9] as comprising "knowledge + skills + dispositions". ...
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... Throughout this report, we emphasize the importance of learning how to learn. For insight into this concept, see [11]. ...
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... Throughout this report, we emphasize the importance of learning how to learn. For insight into this concept, see [11]. ...
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Focus groups are a somewhat informal technique that can help you assess user needs and feeling both before interface design and long after implementation. In a focus group, you bring together six to nine users to discuss issues and concerns about the features of a user interface. The group typically lasts about two hours and is run by a moderator who maintains the group's focus. Focus groups often bring out users' spontaneous reactions and ideas and let you observe some group dynamics and organizational issues. The paper discusses the use and misuse of focus groups
Lärande i praktiken [Learning in practice]
  • R Säljö
Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review
  • T Clear
  • S Beecham
  • J Barr
  • M Daniels
  • R Mcdermott
  • M Oudshoorn
  • N Ragonis
  • P Kinnunen
Situated Reflexive Change : User-Centred Design in (to) Practice
  • E Eriksson
E. Eriksson, Situated Reflexive Change : User-Centred Design in (to) Practice. (Doctoral thesis), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-116403, 2013
Cooperative and Work-Integrated Education in Information Technology
  • T Clear
  • G Claxton
  • S Thompson
  • S Fincher
T. Clear, G. Claxton, S. Thompson, and S. Fincher, "Cooperative and Work-Integrated Education in Information Technology," in International Handbook for Cooperative & Work-Integrated Education, R. Coll and K. Zegwaard, Eds., 2 ed Lowell, MA: World Association for Cooperative Education Inc, pp. 141-150, 2011.