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Abstract

Preservation of the forestry, particularly trees, is essential in managing global warming. However, excessive use of trees for cellulose-based products has continuously depleted world’s forest resources. Nowadays, around 14 % of deforestation is caused by logging for the production of wood cellulose-based products. Many scientists predicted that in 2030, only 10 % of the mature tropical forest will remain. In the era of declining forest resources and expansion of industrialization, it is a worthwhile effort to consider an alternative source of plant cellulose i.e. bacterial cellulose or biocellulose. Biocellulose produced by bacterial fermentation method using various substrates has been proven to be a remarkably versatile biomaterial for a variety of cellulose-based products. Interestingly, the highest cellulose worldwide demands are in the pharmaceutical sector with an annual demand of 30,000 tons. For Malaysia, as a country with vast agricultural areas, the use of generated agricultural wastes such as palm oil mill effluent, pineapple and sugarcane as a fermentation medium can not only avoid environmental pollution but also reduce the production cost. In fact, the use of agricultural wastes as a fermentation medium has proven to reduce 20 % of carbon sources supply for fermentation. In this respect, biocellulose production can play an important role in reducing global warming and preservation of nature.
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