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Nutritional supplementation for hip fracture aftercare in older people: Reviews

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Nutritional supplementation for hip fracture aftercare in older people: Reviews

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Background: Older people with hip fractures are often malnourished at the time of fracture, and subsequently have poor food intake. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2000, and previously updated in 2010. Objectives: To review the effects (benefits and harms) of nutritional interventions in older people recovering from hip fracture. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, trial registers and reference lists. The search was last run in November 2015. Selection criteria: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of nutritional interventions for people aged over 65 years with hip fracture where the interventions were started within the first month after hip fracture. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible, we pooled data for primary outcomes which were: all cause mortality; morbidity; postoperative complications (e.g. wound infections, pressure sores, deep venous thromboses, respiratory and urinary infections, cardiovascular events); and 'unfavourable outcome' defined as the number of trial participants who died plus the number of survivors with complications. We also pooled data for adverse events such as diarrhoea. Main results: We included 41 trials involving 3881 participants. Outcome data were limited and risk of bias assessment showed that trials were often methodologically flawed, with less than half of trials at low risk of bias for allocation concealment, incomplete outcome data, or selective reporting of outcomes. The available evidence was judged of either low or very low quality indicating that we were uncertain or very uncertain about the estimates.Eighteen trials evaluated oral multinutrient feeds that provided non-protein energy, protein, vitamins and minerals. There was low-quality evidence that oral feeds had little effect on mortality (24/486 versus 31/481; risk ratio (RR) 0.81 favouring supplementation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 1.32; 15 trials). Thirteen trials evaluated the effect of oral multinutrient feeds on complications (e.g. pressure sore, infection, venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, confusion). There was low-quality evidence that the number of participants with complications may be reduced with oral multinutrient feeds (123/370 versus 157/367; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.86; 11 trials). Based on very low-quality evidence from six studies (334 participants), oral supplements may result in lower numbers with 'unfavourable outcome' (death or complications): RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.89. There was very low-quality evidence for six studies (442 participants) that oral supplementation did not result in an increased incidence of vomiting and diarrhoea (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.47 to 2.05).Only very low-quality evidence was available from the four trials examining nasogastric multinutrient feeding. Pooled data from three heterogeneous trials showed no evidence of an effect of supplementation on mortality (14/142 versus 14/138; RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.97). One trial (18 participants) found no difference in complications. None reported on unfavourable outcome. Nasogastric feeding was poorly tolerated. One study reported no cases of aspiration pneumonia.There is very low-quality evidence from one trial (57 participants, mainly men) of no evidence for an effect of tube feeding followed by oral supplementation on mortality or complications. Tube feeding, however, was poorly tolerated.There is very low-quality evidence from one trial (80 participants) that a combination of intravenous feeding and oral supplements may not affect mortality but could reduce complications. However, this expensive intervention is usually reserved for people with non-functioning gastrointestinal tracts, which is unlikely in this trial.Four trials tested increasing protein intake in an oral feed. These provided low-quality evidence for no clear effect of increased protein intake on mortality (30/181 versus 21/180; RR 1.42, 95% CI 0.85 to 2.37; 4 trials) or number of participants with complications but very low-quality and contradictory evidence of a reduction in unfavourable outcomes (66/113 versus 82/110; RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.95; 2 trials). There was no evidence of an effect on adverse events such as diarrhoea.Trials testing intravenous vitamin B1 and other water soluble vitamins, oral 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (vitamin D), high dose bolus vitamin D, different oral doses or sources of vitamin D, intravenous or oral iron, ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate versus an isonitrogenous peptide supplement, taurine versus placebo, and a supplement with vitamins, minerals and amino acids, provided low- or very low-quality evidence of no clear effect on mortality or complications, where reported.Based on low-quality evidence, one trial evaluating the use of dietetic assistants to help with feeding indicated that this intervention may reduce mortality (19/145 versus 36/157; RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.95) but not the number of participants with complications (79/130 versus 84/125). Authors' conclusions: There is low-quality evidence that oral multinutrient supplements started before or soon after surgery may prevent complications within the first 12 months after hip fracture, but that they have no clear effect on mortality. There is very low-quality evidence that oral supplements may reduce 'unfavourable outcome' (death or complications) and that they do not result in an increased incidence of vomiting and diarrhoea. Adequately sized randomised trials with robust methodology are required. In particular, the role of dietetic assistants, and peripheral venous feeding or nasogastric feeding in very malnourished people require further evaluation.
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Article
Background: Improving mobility outcomes after hip fracture is key to recovery. Possible strategies include gait training, exercise and muscle stimulation. This is an update of a Cochrane Review last published in 2011. Objectives: To evaluate the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions aimed at improving mobility and physical functioning after hip fracture surgery in adults. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, trial registers and reference lists, to March 2021. Selection criteria: All randomised or quasi-randomised trials assessing mobility strategies after hip fracture surgery. Eligible strategies aimed to improve mobility and included care programmes, exercise (gait, balance and functional training, resistance/strength training, endurance, flexibility, three-dimensional (3D) exercise and general physical activity) or muscle stimulation. Intervention was compared with usual care (in-hospital) or with usual care, no intervention, sham exercise or social visit (post-hospital). Data collection and analysis: Members of the review author team independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We used the assessment time point closest to four months for in-hospital studies, and the time point closest to the end of the intervention for post-hospital studies. Critical outcomes were mobility, walking speed, functioning, health-related quality of life, mortality, adverse effects and return to living at pre-fracture residence. Main results: We included 40 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with 4059 participants from 17 countries. On average, participants were 80 years old and 80% were women. The median number of study participants was 81 and all trials had unclear or high risk of bias for one or more domains. Most trials excluded people with cognitive impairment (70%), immobility and/or medical conditions affecting mobility (72%). In-hospital setting, mobility strategy versus control Eighteen trials (1433 participants) compared mobility strategies with control (usual care) in hospitals. Overall, such strategies may lead to a moderate, clinically-meaningful increase in mobility (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10 to 0.96; 7 studies, 507 participants; low-certainty evidence) and a small, clinically meaningful improvement in walking speed (CI crosses zero so does not rule out a lack of effect (SMD 0.16, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.37; 6 studies, 360 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Mobility strategies may make little or no difference to short-term (risk ratio (RR) 1.06, 95% CI 0.48 to 2.30; 6 studies, 489 participants; low-certainty evidence) or long-term mortality (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.48 to 3.12; 2 studies, 133 participants; low-certainty evidence), adverse events measured by hospital re-admission (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.11; 4 studies, 322 participants; low-certainty evidence), or return to pre-fracture residence (RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.56; 2 studies, 240 participants; low-certainty evidence). We are uncertain whether mobility strategies improve functioning or health-related quality of life as the certainty of evidence was very low. Gait, balance and functional training probably causes a moderate improvement in mobility (SMD 0.57, 95% CI 0.07 to 1.06; 6 studies, 463 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). There was little or no difference in effects on mobility for resistance training. No studies of other types of exercise or electrical stimulation reported mobility outcomes. Post-hospital setting, mobility strategy versus control Twenty-two trials (2626 participants) compared mobility strategies with control (usual care, no intervention, sham exercise or social visit) in the post-hospital setting. Mobility strategies lead to a small, clinically meaningful increase in mobility (SMD 0.32, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.54; 7 studies, 761 participants; high-certainty evidence) and a small, clinically meaningful improvement in walking speed compared to control (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.29; 14 studies, 1067 participants; high-certainty evidence). Mobility strategies lead to a small, non-clinically meaningful increase in functioning (SMD 0.23, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.36; 9 studies, 936 participants; high-certainty evidence), and probably lead to a slight increase in quality of life that may not be clinically meaningful (SMD 0.14, 95% CI -0.00 to 0.29; 10 studies, 785 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Mobility strategies probably make little or no difference to short-term mortality (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.49 to 2.06; 8 studies, 737 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Mobility strategies may make little or no difference to long-term mortality (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.37; 4 studies, 588 participants; low-certainty evidence) or adverse events measured by hospital re-admission (95% CI includes a large reduction and large increase, RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.42; 2 studies, 206 participants; low-certainty evidence). Training involving gait, balance and functional exercise leads to a small, clinically meaningful increase in mobility (SMD 0.20, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.36; 5 studies, 621 participants; high-certainty evidence), while training classified as being primarily resistance or strength exercise may lead to a clinically meaningful increase in mobility measured using distance walked in six minutes (mean difference (MD) 55.65, 95% CI 28.58 to 82.72; 3 studies, 198 participants; low-certainty evidence). Training involving multiple intervention components probably leads to a substantial, clinically meaningful increase in mobility (SMD 0.94, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.34; 2 studies, 104 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). We are uncertain of the effect of aerobic training on mobility (very low-certainty evidence). No studies of other types of exercise or electrical stimulation reported mobility outcomes. Authors' conclusions: Interventions targeting improvement in mobility after hip fracture may cause clinically meaningful improvement in mobility and walking speed in hospital and post-hospital settings, compared with conventional care. Interventions that include training of gait, balance and functional tasks are particularly effective. There was little or no between-group difference in the number of adverse events reported. Future trials should include long-term follow-up and economic outcomes, determine the relative impact of different types of exercise and establish effectiveness in emerging economies.
Article
Objective: Malnutrition is prevalent in elderly with hip fracture and higher than in community-dwelling older adults. Scarce studies have examined the association between preoperative malnutrition and postoperative mortality in elderly Chinese individuals with hip fracture. This study was designed to explore the effect of preoperative malnutrition on the postoperative long-term mortality in elderly Chinese individuals undergoing hip surgery. Methods: As a single-center observational study, this study included 263 consecutive patients above 70 years old with hip fracture and elective surgery. Preoperative nutritional status was evaluated by prognostic nutritional index (PNI). Patients were divided into one group with malnutrition (26 patients with PNI ⩽ 38) and the other group without malnutrition (169 patients with PNI > 38), respectively. Results: The overall malnutrition rate was 13.3% (26 patients). The postoperative long-term mortality rates of patients with and without malnutrition had statistically significant difference [10 patients (38.5%) and 32 patients (18.9%), p < 0.05]. Cox regression analysis showed that malnutrition (hazard ratio: 0.269, 95% confidence interval: 0.085-0.859, p < 0.05) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (hazard ratio: 0.873, 95% confidence interval: 0.790-0.964, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for the postoperative long-term mortality. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that preoperative malnutrition was an independent risk factor for the postoperative long-term mortality and resulted in a more than 2.5-fold increase of the postoperative long-term mortality in elderly Chinese individuals undergoing hip surgery.
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Resumo Atualmente, a fratura intracapsular do colo femoral (FICF) ainda é um grande desafio para os ortopedistas. Apesar dos grandes avanços feitos, persiste uma grande taxa de mortalidade no primeiro ano, sobretudo no Brasil, onde não há uma conscientização de que tais fraturas nos pacientes idosos devem ser tratadas como uma urgência médica. O presente artigo busca fornecer uma atualização das condutas pré-operatórias, cirúrgicas e pós-operatórias.
Article
Aims: The aim of this study was to explore current use of the Global Fragility Fracture Network (FFN) Minimum Common Dataset (MCD) within established national hip fracture registries, and to propose a revised MCD to enable international benchmarking for hip fracture care. Methods: We compared all ten established national hip fracture registries: England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; Scotland; Australia and New Zealand; Republic of Ireland; Germany; the Netherlands; Sweden; Norway; Denmark; and Spain. We tabulated all questions included in each registry, and cross-referenced them against the 32 questions of the MCD dataset. Having identified those questions consistently used in the majority of national audits, and which additional fields were used less commonly, we then used consensus methods to establish a revised MCD. Results: A total of 215 unique questions were used across the ten registries. Only 72 (34%) were used in more than one national audit, and only 32 (15%) by more than half of audits. Only one registry used all 32 questions from the 2014 MCD, and five questions were only collected by a single registry. Only 21 of the 32 questions in the MCD were used in the majority of national audits. Only three fields (anaesthetic grade, operation, and date/time of surgery) were used by all ten established audits. We presented these findings at the Asia-Pacific FFN meeting, and used an online questionnaire to capture feedback from expert clinicians from different countries. A draft revision of the MCD was then presented to all 95 nations represented at the Global FFN conference in September 2021, with online feedback again used to finalize the revised MCD. Conclusion: The revised MCD will help aspirant nations establish new registry programmes, facilitate the integration of novel analytic techniques and greater multinational collaboration, and serve as an internationally-accepted standard for monitoring and improving hip fracture services. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2022;104-B(6):721-728.
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Introduction: Malnutrition is considered a risk factor among geriatric individuals with hip fracture, affecting functional healing and recovery, increasing healthcare spending, and associated with high mortality. In this study, we sought to evaluate the clinical efficacy of oral nutritional supplements in geriatric patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 1625 consecutive patients who underwent fixation or arthroplasty for hip fracture in a tertiary medical center between 2017 and 2020. Patients who had no available albumin or body mass index levels were excluded. The study group is of patients who received an advanced formula in the form of an oral nutritional supplement (ONS), and the control group of patients that received no ONS. Peri- and postoperative complications, readmissions, short-term mortality, and albumin levels were compared between the 2 groups. Results: The final cohort included 1123 patients, 298 in the study group and 825 controls, with a follow-up of at least 1-year. Provision of the advanced enriched formula was not associated with 30-day, 90-day, or 1-year mortality (P = .62, P = .52, and P = .72, respectively) or any perioperative complications, such as 30-day or 90-day readmission (P = .37 and P = .1, respectively), revision surgery of any cause (P = .35), and postoperative infection rates (P = .73). Albumin levels on admission and the minimum albumin levels during hospitalization were similar between the groups, but they were significantly higher in the study group before discharge (33.42 g/L vs. 32.79 g/L, P = .01). Discussion: The use of an ONS was not associated with reduced perioperative complications or mortality, although it did affect nutritional status, as indicated by increased albumin levels, a known marker of nutritional status. Conclusions. While current findings do not support ONS use to minimize major postoperative complication after hip fracture surgery, further long-term study is warranted to evaluate subjective and functional outcomes associated with improved nutritional status.
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(1) Background: Hip fracture is a pathology with high mortality, but the lack of a universal adaptation of the factors associated with death makes it difficult to predict risk and implement prevention in this group. This study aimed to identify the factors that determine a higher mortality at six months following hip fracture. (2) Methods: A retrospective longitudinal study, whose study population consisted of patients over 65 years of age. The main variable was mortality at 6 months of fracture. Relevant data related to sociodemographic and clinical variables for subsequent bivariate (χ2) and multivariate analysis were obtained. (3) Results: In all, 665 people participated in the study, 128 of whom died within 6 months of the fracture. The multivariate adjusted analysis demonstrated significant relationships between the main variable and aspects such as institutionalization at discharge (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.501), a worse overall functional capacity (OR = 2.453) and cognitive capacity (OR = 3.040) at admission, and complications such as heart failure (OR = 5.767) or respiratory infection (OR = 5.308), in addition to the taking of certain drugs and the presence of a greater number of comorbidities. (4) Conclusions: There are certain factors related to higher mortality at six months in patients with hip fracture who are aged 65 years or older.
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Background Proximal femur fractures (PFFs) occur frequently among geriatric patients due to diverse risk factors, such as a lower bone mineral density and the increased risk of falls. Methods In this review, we focus on recent literature of patient-specific risk factors and their impact on common complications and outcome parameters in patients with PFF. Results Patient- and treatment related factors have a significant impact on outcome and are associated with an increased risk of mortality, impairments in functional rehabilitation and complicative courses. Conclusion Geriatric patients at high risk for complications are nursing home inhabitants suffering from severe osteoporosis, dementia and sarcopenia. The early and ongoing assessment for these individual risk factors is crucial. Strategies including interdisciplinary approaches, addressing comorbidities and facilitating an optimal risk factor evaluation result in a beneficial outcome. The ongoing ambulant assessment and therapy of complicating factors (e.g., malnutrition, sarcopenia, frailty or osteoporosis) have to be improved.
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Purpose: To conduct a review of the current state of the evidence for rehabilitation strategies post-fragility fracture. Methods: Narrative review conducted by the Rehabilitation Working Group of the International Osteoporosis Foundation Committee of Scientific Advisors characterizing the range of rehabilitation modalities instrumental for the management of fragility fractures. Results: Multi-modal exercise post-fragility fracture to the spine and hip is strongly recommended to reduce pain, improve physical function, and improve quality of life. Outpatient physiotherapy post-hip fracture has a stronger evidence base than outpatient physiotherapy post-vertebral fracture. Appropriate nutritional care after fragility fracture provides a large range of improvement in morbidity and mortality. Education increases understanding of osteoporosis which in turn increases utilization of other rehabilitation services. Education may improve other health outcomes such as pain and increase a patient's ability for self-advocacy. Conclusion: Rehabilitation interventions are inter-reliant, and research investigating the interaction of exercise, nutrition, and other multi-modal therapies may increase the relevance of rehabilitation research to clinical care.
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Background: Geriatric hip fracture patients often present malnutrition during admission, which leads to higher morbidity and mortality. Protein-based oral nutrition supplements may improve nutritional status. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) according to the PRISMA guidelines to elucidate whether preoperative nutrition supplements can improve postoperative outcomes in geriatric hip fracture patients. Methods: Only RCTs conducted to compare postoperative outcomes between geriatric hip fracture patients (>60 years old) receiving preoperative oral protein-based nutrition supplement (ONS group) and those who receiving regular diet (Control group) were included. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception until August, 2021. Postoperative outcomes, including complications, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality, were assessed. Results: A total of 5 RCTs with 654 geriatric hip fracture patients (ONS group: 320 subjects; Control group 334 subjects) were included. Our data revealed that postoperative complications risk in the ONS group was significantly lower than in the Control group (odd's ratio: 0.48, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.26-0.89, P = .02, I2 = 64%). However, no significant differences in the length of hospital stay (standardized mean difference: -0.35 days, 95% CI: -1.68 to 0.98 days, P = .61, I2 = 0%) and the risk of having postoperative in-hospital mortality (odd's ratio: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.43-2.63, P = .89, I2 = 54%) between these 2 groups were observed. Quality assessment revealed high risk of bias and significant data heterogeneity (I2>50%) in most included RCTs. Conclusion: Preoperative protein-based oral nutrition supplements exert beneficial, but limited, effects on postoperative outcomes in geriatric patients with hip fracture undergoing surgery.
Article
PurposeDespite extensive research, a complete understanding of factors influencing mortality risk after hip fractures is lacking. Previous research has focused on static risk factors; however, to improve outcomes, attention should be directed towards risk factors that may be optimised. The present study aimed to investigate the association of 19 risk factors with mortality among patients with hip fracture treated according to a well-defined guideline.Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of a large prospective patient cohort with all consecutive patients surgically treated for a hip fracture from January 2011 to December 2017 included (n = 2800). Variables were obtained from patient records and the Holstebro Hip Fracture Database comprising prospectively registered data on demographics, comorbidity, malnutrition (low Body Mass Index (BMI) or albumin) and hospital stay (including fracture and surgical data, biochemistry, mobilisation and discharge). Outcomes were 30-day and one-year mortality.ResultsPatients were predominantly female (66%); median age 81.6 years. Overall mortality was 9% at 30 days and 24% at one year. Age ≥ 75 years, male gender, nursing home residence, cognitive impairment, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥ 3, BMI < 20 kg/m2, albumin < 35 g/l, creatinine ≥ 100 µmol/l, a low New Mobility Score and no mobilisation were all associated with increased mortality at 30 days and one year.Conclusion In addition to non-modifiable risk factors, comorbidities (expressed as high ASA score and creatinine), malnutrition, and failure to achieve early post-operative mobilisation were associated with increased short and long-term mortality among patients with hip fracture: these are potentially modifiable. The effect of optimisation interventions warrants further research.
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The CONSORT statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomised controlled trials. Kenneth Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience. To encourage dissemination of the CONSORT 2010 Statement, this article is freely accessible on www.ijph.it.
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Background: The increasing incidence of osteoporotic hip fracture (HF) has raised the requirements of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, whereas this scarce resource may cause morbidity and mortality. Study design and methods: This study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial that aimed to assess efficacy of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) with or without erythropoietin (EPO) in reducing RBC transfusion in the perioperative period of HF. Participants (patients > 65 years admitted with HF and hemoglobin [Hb] levels of 90-120 g/L) were randomly assigned to receive a preoperative single dose of 1 g of FCM (short intravenous [IV] infusion over 15 min), plus 40,000 IU of subcutaneous EPO (EPOFE arm); versus 1 g of IV FCM plus subcutaneous placebo (FE arm); and versus IV and subcutaneous placebo (placebo arm). Primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who received RBC transfusion, and secondary endpoints were the number of RBC transfusions per patient, survival, hemoglobinemia, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL; by means of Short Form 36 Version 2 questionnaire). Results: A total of 306 patients (85% women, mean age 83 ± 6.5 years) were included. A total of 52, 51.5, and 54% of patients required RBC transfusion in the EPOFE, FE, and placebo arms, respectively, with no significant differences in the number of RBC transfusions per patient, survival, HRQoL, and adverse events among treatment groups. A significant increase in Hb levels was achieved at discharge (102 g/L vs. 97 g/L) and 60 days after discharge (125 g/L vs. 119 g/L) in the EPOFE arm with respect to placebo arm; in addition, a higher rate of patients recovered from anemia in the EPOFE arm with respect to the placebo arm (52% vs. 39%), 60 days after discharge. Conclusion: Preoperative treatment with FCM alone or in combination with EPO improved recovery from postoperative anemia, but did not reduce the needs of RBC transfusion in patients with HF.
Article
Elderly with osteoporotic hip fracture are often malnourished, particularly with respect to protein. This protein malnutrition could contribute to hip fracture and adversely influence the outcome. We investigated in a 6-month randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, with a 6 month post-treatment follow-up, the effect on bone metabolism and on clinical outcome of protein supplements in elderly patients with a recent hip fracture. Compared with controls, protein supplemented patients had a significantly greater increase in serum levels of IGF-I, a reduced loss of bone mineral density in proximal femur and a significantly shorter stay in rehabilitation hospitals. In conclusion, protein supplements favorably influence the outcome of elderly after hip fracture.
Article
Background: despite progress in surgical procedures and prosthetic materials, functional recovery after hip fracture is still unsatisfactory in elderly patients and varies greatly from person to person. Objective: to assess whether ten-week supplementation with a multicomponent compound based on energy-giving substances improves: 1) the Barthel Index score (BI); 2) the proportion of patients with combined BI and Activity of Daily Living scores > 25% compared to the beginning of the trial; 3) muscle capacity measured using an ergometer bicycle; 4) outdoor walking without aid; 5) albumin and haemoglobin levels, which are metabolic markers that are positively correlated with physical performance. Results: at the end of the trial, 51.8% of the supplemented patients reached the combined end point (BI+IADL > 25%) compared with 38.4% of the control patients (p<0.05). More modest improvement was seen for BI. Forty-four point four percent of the patients who received active supplementation passed the ergometer bicycle test, compared with 23.0% of the control patients (p<0.05). The patients in the active supplementation group also showed a favourable trend in their biochemical markers and the proportion of patients who walked outdoors without aid. Conclusions: administration of an energy-giving compound together with motor rehabilitation can improve functional recovery and physical performance in elderly hip fracture patients.