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The Decline of Arab Unity: The Rise and Fall of the United Arab Republic

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Abstract

The union between Egypt and Syria - known as the United Arab Republic, 1958-1961 - was a seminal episode in Arab politics. This is the first book that analyzes the reasons for the establishment of this union and its failure. It deals with the political, social and economic reasons that led Gamal 'Abd al-Nasser, the legendary Arab leader, to merge with Syria and the impact of pan-Arabism on the setting up and dissolution of this entity.
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... Accordingly, the incidents of the year prompted all parties to re-evaluate their attitudes towards each other. Nasser understood that any drastic action in Syria to eliminate communist influence would not succeed on its own but required the American support or at least its blessing (Podeh 1999). From the Syrian side, Ba'ath Party and other nationalist elements realized the dangers represented by the Communist Party's members, who became more active in Syrian political arena and gained more prestige at their own expense (Seale 1965). ...
... 193). The US's apathetic reaction to the union was so disappointed to the conservative Arab leaders, particularly to Iraq (Podeh 1999). ...
... 35 See p.115 for more on PKK leader Abdullah Öcalan, who speaks very little Kurdish. leaders (Podeh, 1999). The Arab-Israeli wars, particularly '48 and '67, were Cold War-fueled and crippled by the absence of coordination between the nations' commanders (see Louis and Shlaim, 2012). ...
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... In fact, between 1952 and 1960, one half of Umm Kulthum's songs were 'national in style' (Danielson, 1997, p. 164). When Egypt and Syria united and formed the United Arab Republic (UAR) in 1958, at the heyday of the pan-Arab movement under Nasser's charismatic leadership (Podeh, 1999), the new political entity designated a flag and anthem. Because of the popularity of both the singer and the Egyptian anthem, it was also adopted as the anthem of the UAR. ...
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... He had sent in his deputy, Vice President Abdel Hakim Amer, who frequently clashed with his Syrian counterparts and was expelled from Damascus as the UAR crumbled in 1961. 37 Indeed, the ultimate test of subversive power is the ability to remotely govern other countries effectively. Second, the level of great-power support that he received was far from sufficient. ...
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Chapter
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