Article

An evidence-based review of HR Analytics

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Abstract

We conduct an evidence-based review using an integrative synthesis of published peer-reviewed literature on Human Resource analytics (HR Analytics). Our search of several publication databases identified 60 articles on this topic, however only 14 articles were in quality peer-reviewed journals. Our review of these articles addresses the following 5 questions: (1) What is HR Analytics (how has the concept definition evolved)? (2) How does HR Analytics work (what are the processes)? (3) Why does HR Analytics work (what theories explain cause-effect relationships, antecedents, and consequences)? (4) What does HR Analytics produce (what are the outcomes)? (5) What is required for HR Analytics to succeed (what are the moderators of the analytics-outcome relationships)? We conclude that despite evidence linking the adoption of HR Analytics to organizational performance that adoption of HR Analytics is very low and academic research, and therefore, evidence on this topic is sparse. We offer potential explanations for this paradox and suggest avenues for future research.

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... Finally, this study has advanced existing research on training evaluation by investigating the mediating role of PWAs between DT and TEPs. The companies benefitting from the DT approach use a more sophisticated set of PWAs (Marler and Boudreau, 2017). Using DT, HR professionals may design a more sophisticated set of PWAs to forecast the impact of various HR interventions (Marler and Boudreau, 2017;Sahay, 2014). ...
... The companies benefitting from the DT approach use a more sophisticated set of PWAs (Marler and Boudreau, 2017). Using DT, HR professionals may design a more sophisticated set of PWAs to forecast the impact of various HR interventions (Marler and Boudreau, 2017;Sahay, 2014). They may also develop a more sophisticated set of TEPs using PWAs for predicting accurate outcomes of various training investments. ...
... Hence, this study views PWAs as a strategic organizational capability built on technological resources. In this view, PWAs also offer an opportunity to improve organizational performance for gaining competitive advantage as a unique and value-producing technical resource (Marler and Boudreau, 2017). This study's basic premise is that PWAs support HRM professionals in creating a more sophisticated set of TEPs. ...
Article
Purpose The firms use training evaluation practices (TEPs) to determine the return of billions of dollars spent on employee training and development activities. The firms need to modernize the set of TEPs for evidence-based workforce management decisions. This study aims to examine a mediation mechanism to explain how human resource (HR) professionals’ design thinking (DT) mindset strengthens the set of TEPs using predictive workforce analytics (PWAs). Design/methodology/approach The authors used SPSS computational named MLMED to test the proposed relationships by collecting data from 180 management professionals serving in subsidiaries of multinational corporations in Pakistan. Findings The statistical results demonstrated that DT is not directly related to firms’ TEPs. However, the statistical results supported the mediating role of firms’ use of PWAs between DT and TEPs. Originality/value The findings offer a new perspective for firms to use HR professionals’ DT mindset for modernizing the set of existing HR practices.
... Others question the construct and external validity of people analytics' methods. They claim there is little empirical evidence for the promised outcomes (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). It is suggested that the employees affected by people analytics suffer negative consequences due to discrimination through the underlying algorithms and data sources, which reproduce existing stereotypes and biases (Gal et al., 2017). ...
... Proponents of people analytics praise the datadriven and seemingly objective decisions that lead to more effective human resources management. Examples include improving retention rates and reducing employee attrition, stronger talent management, and lean human resources processes on the operational level (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Levenson (2018) claims that people analytics supports strategy execution, resulting in competitive advantage through long-term workforce planning. ...
... For people analytics, the nucleus is found in the human resources function, which progresses from basic controlling metrics and key performance indicators. It sees prospects in collecting and analyzing data about employees' behaviors to transform their decision-making from intuitive and experiential toward data-driven and evidence-based for informing traditional human resources processes (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Although people analytics originated in human resources, the topic is relevant for any business function concerned with people management (Fecheyr-Lippens et al., 2015). ...
Conference Paper
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People analytics depicts the algorithmization of human resources management characterized by the data-driven automation and support of people-related processes or tasks. On the one hand, people analytics promises productivity increases through optimizing workforce planning, hiring, or talent development. On the other hand, the extensive data collection and analysis of employees' behaviors can be perceived as invasive, raising privacy concerns. This debate cannot only be explained by diverging norms and values, for example, practitioners realizing commercial opportunities while being criticized by academic commentaries. Instead, an alternative explanation suggests that the opposing views can be reconciled by diving into the conceptual differences regarding what analytical methods and data sources people analytics entails. Hence, this paper proposes the conceptions of operational and strategic people analytics based on a literature review of academics' and practitioners' literature. Four propositions about these conceptions' privacy and performance implications are derived. Future research should empirically validate these propositions.
... internal HR research or partnership research in the context of social, behavioral and organizational sciences)" (Falletta and Combs 2021: 54). This goes in line with the evidence-based review by Marler and Boudreau (2017), which uses an integrative synthesis of published peerreviewed literature. Their findings emphasize that HR could soon be technically left behind and thus, hint at an issue that has already been discussed for some years: HR must create technological change in order to continue to play an equal role in the company in the future (Shrivastava and Shaw 2003;Snell et al. 2002;Ulrich 1997). ...
... On the other hand, it must be seen whether the existing data meet the qualitative requirements in order to be able to carry out valid analyses (Jeske and Calvard 2020;King 2016;Minbaeva 2018;Pape 2016). Previous research shows the need for the integration of additional data from different areas of the company into the analysis (Marler and Boudreau 2017;McIver et al. 2018;Rasmussen and Ulrich 2015). To do so, interface compatibility plays an important role (Andersen 2017;Boudreau and Cascio 2017;Douthitt and Mondore 2014;Levenson and Fink 2017). ...
... This is also shown by the results of our descriptive study, in which we found that the available software solutions are perceived to be too complex. More precisely, software solutions for the application of HR analytics are not tailored to the competencies of the users and, thus, will need to be much more user-friendly (Marler and Boudreau 2017). The application of the technology, i.e., software solutions, therefore depends strongly on the respective competencies of the HR business partners or the users of HR analytics in a company. ...
Article
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Firms have recognized the opportunities presented by HR analytics; however, it is challenging for HR to convert their available data (sources) into meaningful strategical value. Moreover, research on the implementation and application of HR analytics is still in its infancy. Drawing on the socio-technical system perspective, we examine the implementation and application of HR analytics in firms. Based on a qualitative study with 17 HR analytics experts, we find that a shift to a more process-oriented perspective on HR analytics is needed. More precisely, besides the requirements for the analysis of data, the actual roles in the process of implementing and applying HR analytics need to be defined. In particular, this implies the interaction between the specialist department, the HR business partner and the HR analytics function. From a managerial perspective, we propose a process model for the future implementation and application of HR analytics.
... Despite the potential benefits of HRA, it has not received adequate attention from management researchers (Marler & Boudreau, 2016). This is because very little information is available about the process through which HRA influences organizations and their performance (Huselid, 2018;Schiemann, Seibert & Blankenship, 2017). ...
... Despite its low adoption rates, the fact that the concept of HRA is gaining popularity in academic circles is evident from the various programs and courses being offered on the topic, which may speed up the HRA adoption rate (Greasley & Thomas, 2020). Hence, more methodological studies are required on the adoption of HRA (Marler & Boudreau, 2016). However, existing organizational dynamics are not yet mature enough to provide space for HRA both within the HRM and the organization. ...
... More research should be carried out on information systems to illustrate the acceptance, usage, and success of information systems technologies in different management fields, although these technologies are yet to be adopted in HRA (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis & Davis, 2016). In addition, more scholarly research is needed on HRA, and its practice should be encouraged at the individual, process, and structural levels within organizations (Marler & Boudreau, 2016;Huselid, 2018;Minbaeva, 2017). It has been suggested that researchers from the management domain could provide significant support to the development of HRA as it can help build organizational competence and establish relevant infrastructure (Simón & Ferreiro, 2017). ...
... The ability of human resource (HR) professionals to convincingly demonstrate the value of competence development activities and initiatives increases the credibility and status of HR professionals (Amalou-Döpke & Süß, 2014). Thus, it is becoming increasingly important for HR professionals to sharpen their analytical abilities and be able to effectively employ metrics (i.e., measures of key outcomes) to demonstrate the value and effectiveness of competence development initiatives (Angrave et al., 2016;Huselid, 2018;Kryscynski et al., 2018;Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Yet the academic and practitioner literature is replete with the view that competence development activities and initiatives are seldom evaluated for their impact on job and organizational performance (e.g., Bennington & Laffoley, 2012). ...
... Another potential explanation draws on a more general understanding of, or interest in, the value added by HR professionals (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). For example, according to a study of the exchange relationship between the HR department and top management (Amalou-Döpke & Süß, 2014), the recognition from top managers that HR issues are important had symbolic value for the HR department's potential to work with HR measurements. ...
... The second category of factors relates to the HR professionals themselves, and especially to their competences and resources. Conducting assessments requires the knowledge and skills to design instruments, collect data, analyze data, and report the findings (Levenson, 2011;Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Rasmussen & Ulrich, 2015). When HR professionals lack knowledge and skills in these areas it impedes their work in the domain of assessment of outcomes of competence development activities (Kennedy et al., 2014). ...
Article
Purpose: This study aims to explore how human resource (HR) practitioners conceive of their practice, reveal challenges they grapple with in daily work and generate a conceptual framework of HR praxis. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on interviews with HR practitioners in Sweden and a review of articles that examine aspects of HR practitioners' work. Findings: The HR practitioners' work is fragmented and reactive, filled with meetings and affords few opportunities to work undisturbed. Operational tasks are prioritised over strategic work, and their work sometimes involves tasks that are not HR's responsibility. The nature of HR practitioners' daily work mimics the work of their main “customer”, i.e. managers within the organisations. Practical implications: The HR practitioners were working mainly in the service of managers, which suggests that they have an internal focus. Consistent with current, prescriptive HR discourse, HR practitioners should adopt a multi-stakeholder perspective of human resource management (HRM) and a more external focus that is necessary to contribute to wider, organisational effectiveness. The findings could enrich what is taught in higher education by providing students with an account of the reality of HR practitioners' daily work. Originality/value: The study provides a situated account of the daily work of HR practitioners, which is largely absent from the literature.
... Applying analytics in HR implies internal and external data integration related to human capital, as well as using technology solutions to collect, analyze, and report information to support workforce decisions connected to company results (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Investing in this practice is a fair way of adding value for a company's stakeholders. ...
... Periodic systematic reviews are necessary to consolidate the studies of a specific segment, which allows researchers to have access to the state of the art. Two important reviews were published in 2016 (Marler & Boudreau, 2017) and 2018 (Tursunbayeva, Di Lauro, & Pagliari, 2018). ...
... Both the reviews show increasing interest since the early 2000s in the theme of analytics in HR through the number of publications and the searches associated with the issue. Around the first decade of the 2000s, there were few publications per year, but after 2010, the number increased noticeably (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). ...
Article
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Surveys related to analytics in the area of human resources (HR) have increased in the last 10 years. They usually suggest frameworks, tools, and concepts. Although there is much useful information, there is still a lack of materials consolidating real case studies or quantitative experiments with HR data. This systematic review analyzes 42 papers with analytical experiments in terms of three different segments of HR: recruitment, talent management, and turnover. The goal is to offer an updated perspective of what is being applied in HR regarding the problems that can be solved with data analysis, the most used techniques, and what could be explored to promote more scientific research on data-oriented projects in HR. Some of the results include talent management as the segment with the most related papers and the use of companies' internal data as predominant in the studies.
... HR analytics has attracted increased attention so much so that a policy to adopt analytics appears almost compulsory for self-respecting HR functions (Angrave et al., 2016;Boudreau & Cascio, 2017;Greasley & Thomas, 2020;Margherita, 2022;Marler & Boudreau, 2017;McCartney & Fu, 2022a;Minbaeva, 2018;van der Togt & Rasmussen, 2017). HR analytics is also referred to as workforce analytics (McIver et al., 2018), people analytics (Ryan, 2020), and human capital analytics (Huselid, 2018;Schiemann et al., 2018). ...
... As the enactors of HR analytics, HR analysts' work is also shaped by the institutional expectations regarding developing effective policy and practice for HR analytics. Existing research suggests that HR departments benefit from several new opportunities provided by HR analytics via taking a data-driven and evidence-based approach to make decisions on strategic business issues (Bartel, 2000;Ben-Gal, 2019;Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Rousseau, 2006; van der Laken, Bakk, Giagkoulas, van Leeuwen, & Bongenaar, 2018). For example, in order to make an impact, and effectively perform HR analytics activities (i.e., running reports, co-designing visualisations and dashboards, and building predictive models), HR analysts need to develop analytical skills, many of which have been well described in the literature (Andersen, 2017;Angrave et al., 2016;Edwards & Edwards, 2019;Guenole et al., 2017;Margherita, 2022;Minbaeva, 2018;Rasmussen & Ulrich, 2015). ...
... More recently, Fernandez and Gallardo-Gallardo (2020) echo this sentiment stating that only 20% of 1200 HR executives indicated that organisations view analytics as a strategic HR practice over the next few years. As a result, HR analysts need to engage in institutional work to gain managerial buy-in from senior leaders (Davenport, 2013;Huselid, 2015;Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Minbaeva, 2018) and persuade companies to make decisions to support a policy to implement HR analytics (Vargas, Yurova, Ruppel, Cynthia, Tworoger, & Greenwood, 2018). ...
Article
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Given the increased popularity of HR analytics, a particular focus has been placed on its enactors ‐ HR analysts. Their capabilities are believed to entail analytical and storytelling skills. While we acknowledge the importance of analytical skills, this study utilises an exploratory and qualitative approach to extend our understanding on the storytelling of HR analysts, which remains less understood in the HR analytics research. Data from HR analysts shows they engage in storytelling as showcasing, incorporating a narrow approach to translating and selling. The latter is a broader form of institutional work to gain legitimacy for HR analytics on a general level. New insights are also offered on how HR analysts engage in storytelling as curbing, a form of institutional work linked with decoupling HR analytics policy from daily practices and projects. HR analysts engage with these two seemingly contradictory aspects of storytelling to develop sustainable and legitimate HR analytics.
... Existing studies have tended to examine the direct impact of digital HRM practices on organizations and individuals; we suggest that this focus on direct effect is faulty if intra-organizational context is not taken into account. In addition, existing studies exploring the requirements of digital HRM have focused on factors such as employee acceptance of the technology [25], HR professional analytical skills [26,27], or aiding managerial buy-in [28]. To date, very few empirical studies have been conducted on the maturity of HRM capability [1]. ...
... Specifically, we demonstrate the interplay relationship of digital HRM practices and HRM capability maturity with action changes in organizations. Acknowledging the limited theoretical perspectives in digital HRM-related research [27,31], we have suggested that AST facilitates scholars' better understanding of the "productivity paradox" in practicing digital HRM. Second, by exploring HRM capability maturity as a key boundary condition of the effects of digital HRM, we challenge the prevailing consensus regarding the universally positive effects of digital HRM, providing an answer to the question of when digital HRM practices promote versus inhibit HRM effectiveness. ...
... The spirit is the "official line" that "... the technology presents to people regarding how to act when using the system, how to interpret its features." In terms of digital HRM, the spirit may reflect features, including features based on data evidence, which provide insight through analysis [27]. Digital technology is meant to encompass the spirit of seamless work with colleagues across the organization, overcoming the limits of human rationality to provide a more objective, accurate, and professional service. ...
... A survey done by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) in the year 2014 also confirms that decisions related to all functions whether in marketing, finances, sales or human resource in organization are dependent on their personal experience and intuition. Still many organization are lagging behind to adopt human resource analytics (Fernandez, & Gallardo-Gallardo, 2020;Vargas et.al, 2018;Marler& Boudreau, 2017) despite of avaibility access of information. Human resource analytics is data driven (Mohammed, & Quddus ,2019) and when it comes to mind its related only to statistical analysis i.e. is incorrect (Anjani & Nithya, 2018;Vargas et.al , 2018) ;as according to Jac Fitz-Enz, (2010) said "Analytics is a mental framework, first a logical progression and second a set of statistical tools ." ...
... Human resource analytics is data driven (Mohammed, & Quddus ,2019) and when it comes to mind its related only to statistical analysis i.e. is incorrect (Anjani & Nithya, 2018;Vargas et.al , 2018) ;as according to Jac Fitz-Enz, (2010) said "Analytics is a mental framework, first a logical progression and second a set of statistical tools ." Implementing it to today"s business organization gives better result in various function like talent management, better ROI, decision making etc. (Wandhe, 2020 ;Mohammed, & Quddus ,2019;Marler and Boudreau, 2017).Nevertheless, the corporate world now recognizes the significance of talent-related information and is starting to fully adopt the information revolution in the field of human resource management. Analytics becoming involved in more and more organizations to the workforce as a way to better manage their human capital and shape future business strategy. ...
Article
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In today‟s data driven world, HRM strategies are changing in terms of HR metrics and HR analytics being used in the organization for better decision making. This digitalization will help the organization to become more reliable towards data driven decision making rather than intuition. Which can assist organizations to take up present strategic and operational data and turn it into an effective approach to the HR problems of tomorrow. HR analytics has become a significant instrument for achieving success; taking advantage of present data to anticipate future ROI as a source of strategic advantage. The current study is an attempt to give an overview of developments in HR analytics at present by briefly focusing to identify the shift in the HR roles in different perspective. This paper also discusses the importance of understanding the implications of HRA. In addition, article also highlighted the future need for HR analytics, befitting for today‟s world of business industry.
... Second, in order to manage the skills in the digital workplace, it is recommended that companies analyze the current status quo of skills and make it transparent between departments (Marler and Boudreau 2017). This can be done by auditing the available resources of the employees (e.g., HR analytics). ...
... This can be done by auditing the available resources of the employees (e.g., HR analytics). Recording the existing conditions is a foundation for further improvements, and these insights can be used to re-or upskill the employees toward a digital workplace (Marler and Boudreau 2017). In sum, the recent implication can help businesses assess their current resources transparently. ...
Article
Full-text available
Businesses are confronted with digital challenges and require skilled employees to work effectively in the digital workplace. Drawing on the theoretical background of digital workplace transformation and the conceptual learning framework, we conducted a qualitative study. With the help of a cross-case analysis of nine multinational corporations, we provide a skillset for leaders on how to train the workforce in the digital workplace. The insights showed that an entrepreneurial mindset, digital responsible thinking, digital literacy, transformative skills, personal development skills, communication skills, community management skills, data analytic skills, and web development skills are critical in the digital workplace. These findings contribute to the literature by offering an exploratory understanding of essential skills for the digital workplace. Furthermore, we provide a theoretical foundation for future empirical investigations of cognitive and metacognitive, social-emotional, and practical skills. The study also offers practical implications for businesses and leaders on how to upskill the workforce and what kind of employees to recruit in the future workplace.
... The use of data and statistical analysis in HRM is central to the field of human resource analytics (HR analytics or HR-A) (Angrave et al., 2016;Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Through HR-A, managers of HR aim to collect, analyze, and process data relating to employees to provide a basis for decision-making on strategic business issues. ...
... In addition to this strategic orientation of HR, which is ultimately seen as a competitive advantage for the company (McIver et al., 2018), decisionmaking processes that have often been perceived as subjective or intuitive can be approached more objectively. This in turn affects HR in all its functional areas, from HR marketing and personnel deployment planning to people development and staff retention (Isson & Harriott, 2016;Marler & Boudreau, 2017). ...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of important topics in human resource management (HRM) that are affected by digitalization and automation. It is outlined how work in HRM is changing in areas such as mental health at work, work design, leadership, and personnel development. The last section shifts focus and introduces a new way of working in HRM, known as HR analytics or people analytics. The fact that the various topics are not independent of each other and indeed intersect with each other is illuminated in the individual sections.
... Thirty-five years have passed since Fitz-enz (considered the father of HRA) published his book How to measure human resources management (Jac & Fitz-enz, 1984). Since then, HRA has received little academic interest (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Yet, practitioners and consultants from all over the world urge their companies to invest more in sophisticated human resources information systems to collect and analyze employee data. ...
... Specifically, we define SUHRA as an actionresearch practice that uses meaningful company data and statistical analysis to enhance data-driven decisions that lead the firm to achieve economic, social, and environmental benefits. This definition takes other definitions into account (e.g., Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Tursunbayeva et al., 2018), adds the action-research method, and sets boundaries to limit the definition of HRA. ...
Article
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Human Resources Analytics (HRA) is drawing more attention every year, and will be crucial to human resource development. However, the literature around the topic would appear to be more promotional than descriptive. With this in mind, we conducted a systematic literature review and content analysis with the following objectives: first, to address the current state of HRA and second, to propose a framework for the development of HRA as a sustainable practice. We analyzed 79 articles from research databases and found 34 empirical studies for subsequent content analysis. While the main results reflect the relative newness of the field of HRA, with the majority of the empirical articles focusing on financial aspects, they also reveal the growing importance given to ethics. Finally, we propose a framework for the development of sustainable HRA based on the triple bottom line and discuss the implications of our findings for researchers and practitioners. La analítica de recursos humanos: una revisión sistemática desde la perspectiva de una gestión sostenible R E S U M E N La analítica de recursos humanos (ARH) atrae cada vez más atención en los últimos años y será crucial para el desarrollo del ámbito de los recursos humanos. No obstante, la literatura sobre el tema parece ser más promocional que descriptiva. Para comprobar esto, llevamos a cabo una revisión sistemática de la literatura y un análisis de contenido con los siguientes objetivos: primero, abordar el estado actual la ARH y segundo, proponer un marco para el desarrollo de la AHR como una práctica sostenible. Analizamos 79 artículos de investigación incluidos en las más prestigiosas bases de datos y encontramos 34 estudios empíricos para su posterior análisis de contenido. Los principales resultados reflejan la relativa novedad del campo de la ARH, estando centrados la mayoría de los artículos en los aspectos financieros. No obstante, también se observa la creciente importancia dada a la ética. Finalmente, proponemos un marco para el desarrollo de una ARH basada en la triple cuenta de resultados (económica, social y medioambiental, y se discuten las implicaciones prácticas y teóricas de nuestros hallazgos.
... Thirty-five years have passed since Fitz-enz (considered the father of HRA) published his book How to measure human resources management (Jac & Fitz-enz, 1984). Since then, HRA has received little academic interest (Marler & Boudreau, 2017). Yet, practitioners and consultants from all over the world urge their companies to invest more in sophisticated human resources information systems to collect and analyze employee data. ...
... Specifically, we define SUHRA as an actionresearch practice that uses meaningful company data and statistical analysis to enhance data-driven decisions that lead the firm to achieve economic, social, and environmental benefits. This definition takes other definitions into account (e.g., Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Tursunbayeva et al., 2018), adds the action-research method, and sets boundaries to limit the definition of HRA. ...
... The functionalities of workplace technologies, such as smart agents and analytics technologies, have expanded and they are no longer limited to discrete office applications (Baptista et al., 2020). Complex platform solutions, such as people analytics (PA), collect, store, and analyze data from the workforce to enable data-driven decision making (Marler and Boudreau, 2016). The appearance of workplace technologies is, therefore, not a new phenomenon, but the extent of their usage is ...
Conference Paper
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Workplace technologies lead to increasing levels of transparency for managers and employees. On the one hand, transparency facilitates novel styles of work, but on the other hand, it drives employee privacy concerns. Despite the technical possibilities to monitor employees, workforce demands empowerment leadership and challenges the assumptions from agency theory. Thus, following a design science research process and collaborating closely with the software provider SoftCo over three years, we aim to develop a suitable technical solution to the changing needs. We build on the knowledge base of stewardship theory, the concept of transparency, and existing market solutions. The design cycles are driven by literature search and empirical investigations, such as qualitative interviews at SoftCo. In this research-in-progress paper, we derive design requirements, design principles, and design features for digital leadership innovations that facilitate stewardship behavior and outline our further research agenda.
... We answer calls for more research on various ways in which managers integrate resources and create capabilities (Marler and Boudreau, 2017;Zeng and Glaister, 2017;McIver et al., 2018;Singh and Del Giudice, 2019) and calls for additional theory development and empirical testing to more fully identify and understand the actions managers take to manage a firm's resources (Sengupta et al., 2022;Sirmon et al., 2011). The capacity to integrate resources (Ferraris et al., 2019;Gupta and George, 2016), the need for particular skills (Angrave et al., 2016;Dahlbom et al., 2020;Vargas et al., 2018) and perceived usefulness of data analytics Lai et al., 2018;Park and Kim, 2021;Shet et al., 2021) have been argued to be key in the effective use of data analytics. ...
Article
Purpose This article aims to examine the factors that influence how managers approach data analytics. Design/methodology/approach The authors draw on content analysis of 34 in-depth interviews with managers in various sectors in France. Findings Using Resource Orchestration Theory as the theoretical lens, the findings show that an understanding of the importance of data analytics, having the skills to effectively use data analytics and the capability to integrate data analytics throughout organizations impact the approach adopted by managers. Based on these interrelated factors, a typology of four different approaches is identified: buyer-users, segmenters, promoters and implementers. Research limitations/implications The authors' study reflects results from multiple industries instead of one particular sector. Delving deeper into the practices of distinct sectors with respect to the authors' typology would be of interest. Practical implications The study points to the role of managers and more specifically managers' perception of the opportunities and challenges related to data analytics. These perceptions emerge in managers' skills and capacity to understand and integrate dimensions of data analytics that go beyond one's areas of expertise in order to create capabilities towards an organization's advantage. Originality/value The authors contribute by revealing three interrelated factors influencing how managers approach data analytics in managers' organizations. The authors address the need expressed by practitioners to better identify factors responsible for adoption and effective use of data analytics.
... To achieve O1, in the first step of Stage 1, the search used the keywords: "market performance, " "human capital performance, " "work performance, " "human capital, " "workforce, " "human resources, " and "talent management." In this step, 15 selected articles (Harel and Tzafrir, 1999;Beatty et al., 2003;Schneider et al., 2003;Combs et al., 2006;Crook et al., 2011;Kamya, 2012;Harpan and Draghici, 2014;Folds, 2015;Rasmussen and Ulrich, 2015;Hecklau et al., 2016;Marler and Boudreau, 2017;Huselid, 2018;Minbaeva, 2018;Whysall et al., 2019;Pagán-Castaño et al., 2020) were read in full to map the connection between market performance, organizational performance, and human capital performance. ...
Article
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The new managerial challenges are related to finding solutions for complex problems, inside some more and more complex management systems, in a continuously changing organizational context. Competitivity and progress imply a continuous positive change and the need to accept, respond, and adapt to the organization’s internal and external environments changes. This brief research report aims to point out the organizational ergonomics’ contribution to employees’ wellbeing through a systemic, emotional, and spiritual approach to man’s interaction with technology, systems, and organizational environment. The research methods used were the multidisciplinary bibliographic study and the interview. Three semi-structured interviews were taken to explore today’s challenges and new 4.0 technologies’ impact, especially robots, on the company and on employees’ wellbeing and spiritual fulfillment. The novelty comes from the analysis of new technologies’ impact on the human factor from the spiritual point of view. Our main results have to do with the shaping of a model for human capital’s valorization and with suggesting a list for monitoring human capital valorization in the company. This article’s main conclusion shows that the organizations’ management must be prepared to manage future challenges by improving the employee’s abilities, adaptability to change, and collaboration with robots.
... Sophisticated analysis includes, among other things, the use of predictive models. Marler and Boudreau (2017) point out there is some definitional ambiguity between these terms, but for the purpose of this chapter these definitions are useful. ...
Chapter
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Peodair Leihy and José M. Salazar describe how theories of academic capitalism, which arose during the 1980s and 1990s, have inspired commentary on expanding academic systems where transactional incentives have greatly informed academic behaviours. Often this transformation has seen not the monetization of academic values, but their squeezing out by more venal operators. In developing academic systems, such as the one they focus on – Chile – that have sought to mimic mature systems in academic career structures, academic capitalism low on real academic capital, which they dubbed academic careerism, can take root. Their chapter illustrates the differences between academic capitalism and academic careerism in a range of dimensions, with examples from the Chilean context, practices and events. A corollary is to dispel the common misconception in countries such as Chile that the troubled practice of academic capitalism in developed academic systems is just about money and power.
... For example, to increase the attractiveness of an organization as an employer, it is important that the organization properly uses and combines different communication forms to communicate with potential employees. As a result of increasing reliance on social media and the Internet for information, online career opportunity advertising became a key recruitment tool, especially for Y-generation job seekers or highly skilled individuals (Marler and Boudreau, 2017). Organizations' socially responsible activities are essential for these two groups when choosing an employer. ...
... Industrial Revolution brought advances in Electronics and information technology [1], and today with the increased Internet bandwidth, there is a noticeable change in organisational structure leading to more hybrid and virtual models [1], [2]. Digitisation of HR has accelerated in the recent few years, and as new technology [3] areas like Big Data, Artificial Intelligence and Analytics emerge and mature HR for business excellence [4], [5]. With automation of most of the traditionally transactional activities [6]associated with HR Function, the roles of the HR team members are also evolving into more of a strategic partnership with business leading to Strategic Business Outcomes [2], [7]. ...
Article
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TITLE: Review on Digitalisation and Artificial Intelligence in Human Resource Function of Energy Sector ABSTRACT: This review paper identifies the linkages between digital human resource management and people’s performance in the Indian energy sector, ensuring competitive advantage, including information system strategising for sustainability, stability, and business excellence. This article presents the literature review results on keywords identified from interviews with experts from the energy sector. The experts' perspective highlights that the non-amalgamation of business performance and excellence in the human resource function leads to companies' opportunity costs. The inferences were made using the voyant tools. The findings suggest that the key themes of digitalisation change in the energy sector are- Digital HR and performance, Digital HR implementation and Digital HR and competitive advantage. This business problem, if explored, by mapping strategic activity with people performance by identifying keywords from managerial levels and their view on the role of digitalisation and Artificial Intelligence. The prerequisites for a successful digitalisation are continuously improving and exploring unexplored frontiers for managing HR Digitally for HR Excellence and Sustainable Business Performance. The HR experts seek a solution to the vital question of amalgamating digitalisation and people performance to achieve competitive advantage. KEYWORDS: Energy Sector, HR Digitalisation, Green HR, AI in HR, Blockchain, Sustainable Development Goals, DISCoMs, Power Sector. CITATION: Sharma A., Tyagi R., Verma A. and Paul A. (2022). Review on Digitalisation and Artificial Intelligence in Human Resource Function of Energy Sector. Water and Energy International. 65r (2):38-46.
... Some of the ways through which HR professionals display their analytics designer, and interpreter competencies are by -precise statistical interpretation, removal of bad data, drawing proper inferences when there is uncertainty or lack of clarity in data, use of thorough analysis during interpretation information, effective usage of HR analytics to produce value for organisation, and utilising data to channelise organisational decision-making. Marler and Boudreau (2017) reviewed 60 articles using integrative synthesis approach on HR analytics and found 14 of them to be of good quality for consideration to study. Through the review, they attempted to find the moderators for the success of HR analytics. ...
... O interesse pelo tema "Human Resources Analytics" (ou HR Analytics) parece estar ganhando espaço relevante dentro do campo de Gestão de Recursos Humanos (GRH): seja pelas referências que citam o tema (Marler & Boudreau, 2017;Angrave et alii, 2016;Pape, 2016;Rasmussen & Ulrich, 2015;Dulebohn & Johnson, 2013;Aral et alii, 2012;Davenport & Harris, 2010;Beatty et alii, 2003), seja pela evolução oito vezes mais acelerada do volume de publicação de trabalhos nos últimos 11 anos em comparação com o principal tema em que se aninha ("Gestão de Recursos Humanos"), conforme se pode observar no Gráfico 1. ...
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This study aims to improve the definition of HR Analytics as a way to direct a taxonomy linked to the managerial implications of the activity in organizations. HR Analytics has been a growing focus of works with objectives linked to (i) Human Resources Management subsystems and (ii) propositions of frameworks for structuring the theme. However, the literature indicates that there are difficulties in administering the activity and little distinction about resources and activities related to these objectives. Based on a bibliometric survey of publications on the subject in the Scopus database in the last 10 years, characteristics of interest were identified and an analysis was carried out under the perspective of Systems Theory. The analysis allowed to identify different objectives for HR Analytics, which, managerially, means the mobilization of different resources, components and forms of administration and, academically, distinct definitions and boundaries with adjacent themes. The application of Systems Theory to differentiate the objectives of HR Analytics seems to point out that the evolution of the understanding of the subject is linked to the differentiation of the administration of resources and components according to the intended objectives. Based on the results of this research, proposals for frameworks for HR Analytics can be better directed from the point of view of processes and human and technological resources to be mobilized.
... In addition, they stressed on the importance of linked resources and amount of infrastructure needed to carry out these processes. Marler and Boudreau (2017) suggests that the adoption of HR digitalization in organizations is not in a mature stage of development. "There is still much room for academic researchers to add to the HR Analytics literature and conversation". ...
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Digitalization has transformed business functions in the 21 st century. Human resource management is a critical component to manage to gain a competitive edge in a digitalized world. The role of human resource management in planning, recruitment, performance management and learning and development will be evaluated based on digitalized functions scale and its association to improving efficiency and quality output. The purpose of this paper is to understand the opportunities and challenges in digitalizing the human resource management in Middle East by evaluating the previous literature in a broader spectrum of digitalized HRM functions, that would illustrate a more balanced perspective of Digital HRM. The research method included analysis of secondary data that described the level of digitization implemented and adopted by various companies in middle east region and assessed the main opportunities and challenges associated with these functions. The finding shows that the digital transformation and automated processes will allow time reduction, and remove repetitive tasks and actions, maximize employee's engagement, and enhanced time management to benefit the organization. Digitalization will provide more simplicity and easy solutions when it comes to addressing. There is an increased challenges are associated to the level of digitalization implemented without a consideration to human, psychological factors. HR functions that relay on human factors such as recruitment, and performance evaluation were challenging due to the involvement of emotional aspects such as face to face meetings and personality assessments. While other HR function such as planning, and selection gained a positive outcome due to the involvement of digitalization and biasness that these technologies offer. Human resource management should be trained to manage change across the organization, where talent development and upskilling are key enabler of digitalization and long-term planning, and an accurate calculation of Return-on-Investment ROI are critical factor to the success on the investment in these technologies.
... Pape (2016) added the use of visualization tools and predictive analytics to enhance data accessibility about employee attributes, behaviours and performances, making it more easier for HR to interpret and take actions. Moreover, people analytics applications in organizations provide additional insights about job applicants while keeping recruitment and retention processes automated (Baesens et al., 2017;Marler and Boudreau, 2017). People analytics related terms and concepts started appearing within academic articles and in online searches in 2004, of which people analytics and HR analytics being the most popular keywords (Tursunbayeva & Pagliari, 2018). ...
Chapter
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Chapter
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People analytics, the practice of collecting, analyzing and using data to improve the role of talent in strategy execution and value creation (Huselid, 2018), has received a lot of attention, yet little is known about the adoption, practice and impact of people analytics on firms operating in the Greek business environment. To answer this question, Deree – ACG and KPMG collaborated on a study to examine people’s analytics’ adoption in Greece, the underlying reasons, the challenges involved, the key enablers, and the impact of people analytics on organizational performance. The study draws from a sample of 107 companies in Greece. Depending on their maturity in the usage of people analytics, firms were classified into basic, emergent, advanced, and leading users.
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This study paper focuses on HR Analytics as a tool of HR Auditing andits influence on organizational performance and the competitiveness ofenterprises. Over the course of the last three to four years, businesseshave begun to implement analytics systems across a variety of theiroperational domains in response to the expanding impact of globalizationand technology. One of the divisions deals with the management ofthe available human resources. Therefore, it is obligatory to know yourmanpower, their competence, talents, capacity to conduct job usingHR Analytics. Reviewing and aligning the workforce is extremely vital toassess Return on Investment (ROI). As a result, HR Analytics is an essentialtool in the HR Audit system. This tool is highly important not only forthe organization as a whole but also for the development of individualsworking in the organization. HR Analytics has the potential to drive avariety of different HR tasks, including workforce planning, scheduling,incentive schemes, salary estimations, pay budgeting, employeerelations. It provides valuable insights for general managers and HRleaders, allowing them to make key talent decisions, compensationsystems, organizational design, allocation of HR analytics for trainingbudgets as a “must have” capability to ensure that HR analytics asa “must have” capability that will ensure HR’s future as a strategicmanagement function while simultaneously transforming organizationalperformance for the better levels.Keywords: HR Analytics, HR Practices, HR Audit, Recruitment andSelection, Succession Planning, Performance Management, EmployeeAttrition, Evaluate, Effectiveness
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Orcid: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9588-6120 ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT Purpose: The main objective of the study is to examine the relationship between Human Capital Management, Human resource analytics and Organizational performance through systematic literature survey Theoretical Framework: The authors developed a conceptual framework to examine the relationship between the components of the Human Capital Management (HCM) and its effect on organizational performance with the mediation of HR analytics Design/methodology/approaches: The study is based on extensive systematic literature review collected from previous studies Findings: The systematic review validated the proposed conceptual model and found that HR analytics help organizations track their human capital management and improves organizational performance Research practical social implication: This study makes significant contributions to the existing body of knowledge of Human capital management and application of innovative tool of HR analytics .There are several implications for practitioners based on the findings Originality/value: The study is more relevant and practically applied to the organization who are in the nurturing stage of implementing HR analytics towards Human Capital Management for increasing organizational performance Doi: https://doi. RESUMO Finalidade: O objetivo principal do estudo é examinar a relação entre Gestão de Capital Humano, Análise de Recursos Humanos e Desempenho Organizacional através de pesquisa sistemática de literatura Estrutura teórica: Os autores desenvolveram uma estrutura conceitual para examinar a relação entre os componentes da Gestão do Capital Humano (HCM) e seu efeito sobre o desempenho organizacional com a mediação da análise de RH. Design/metodologia/abordagens: O estudo é baseado em uma extensa revisão sistemática da literatura coletada de estudos anteriores Conclusões: A revisão sistemática validou o modelo conceitual proposto e constatou que a análise de RH ajuda as organizações a rastrear sua gestão de capital humano e melhora o desempenho organizacional Pesquisa de implicação social prática: Este estudo faz contribuições significativas para o corpo de conhecimento existente de gestão de capital humano e aplicação de ferramentas inovadoras de análise de RH. Originalidade/valor: O estudo é mais relevante e praticamente aplicado à organização que se encontra na fase de implementação da análise de RH para a Gestão do Capital Humano para aumentar o desempenho organizacional. Palavras-chave: Análise de RH, Desempenho Organizacional, Gestão do Capital Humano IMPACTO DE LA GESTIÓN DEL CAPITAL HUMANO EN EL RENDIMIENTO DE LA ORGANIZACIÓN CON EL EFECTO DE MEDIACIÓN DE HUMAN RESOURCE ANALYTIC RESUMEN Objetivo: El objetivo principal del estudio es examinar la relación entre la gestión del capital humano, el análisis de los recursos humanos y el rendimiento de la organización a través de un estudio bibliográfico sistemático. Marco teórico: Los autores desarrollaron un marco conceptual para examinar la relación entre los componentes de la Gestión del Capital Humano (GCH) y su efecto en el desempeño organizacional con la mediación de la analítica de recursos humanos Diseño/metodología/enfoques: El estudio se basa en una amplia revisión sistemática de la literatura recogida en estudios anteriores. Resultados: La revisión sistemática validó el modelo conceptual propuesto y descubrió que la analítica de RRHH ayuda a las organizaciones a hacer un seguimiento de su gestión del capital humano y mejora el rendimiento de la organización Implicación social práctica de la investigación: Este estudio contribuye de forma significativa al conjunto de conocimientos existentes sobre la gestión del capital humano y la aplicación de la innovadora herramienta de análisis de RRHH. Originalidad/valor: El estudio es más relevante y se aplica en la práctica a las organizaciones que se encuentran en la fase de implementación de la analítica de RRHH para la gestión del capital humano con el fin de aumentar el rendimiento de la organización.
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HR Analytics liefert die erforderlichen Informationen, um personalwirtschaftliche Entscheidungen möglichst datenbasiert und rational treffen zu können. Als Weiterentwicklung des Personalcontrollings umfasst HR Analytics die systematische Erhebung und Auswertung personalwirtschaftlicher Daten zur Unterstützung von Personalmanagemententscheidungen.
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Environmental management is considered an important parcel of Sustainable development set by the United Nations (UN). Accordingly, organizations today are looking for innovative ways to improve their environmental management. As part of environmental management practices is the Green HumanResource Management (Green HRM). The current paper is intended to respond to the challenge of achieving sustainable performance by organizations whereby Green HRM contributes to the development of circular economy (CR) business models. First, the current paper describes the environmental dimension of sustainable development. Then, it highlights the major role Green HRM plays in achieving sustainable and environmental performance; thus helping organizations to capture the potential interface between Green HRM and Circular Economy (CE). In the end, an explanation of how HR analytics and related HR matrices are utilized to improve strategic decisions related to Green HRM, thus improving the environmental organizational performance.
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The debate over eliminating performance ratings addresses many important theoretical and practical issues. However, the academic debate on the topic is disconnected from the concerns of practitioners. Knowledge gained from theory-driven research is not leading practice on the use of performance ratings, despite the large volume of potentially relevant research findings. Many organizations are charging ahead with performance management solutions that seem sensible to them. They may be interested in academic research, but they are not waiting for it. We will argue that academic researchers who hope to influence practice need to better understand the concerns of practitioners and the research opportunities that are presented by contemporary practice.
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The HR world is abuzz with talk of big data and the transformative potential of HR analytics. This article takes issue with optimistic accounts, which hail HR analytics as a ‘must have’ capability that will ensure HR's future as a strategic management function while transforming organisational performance for the better. It argues that unless the HR profession wises up to both the potential and drawbacks of this emerging field and engages operationally and strategically to develop better methods and approaches, it is unlikely that existing practices of HR analytics will deliver transformational change. Indeed, it is possible that current trends will seal the exclusion of HR from strategic, board-level influence while doing little to benefit organisations and actively damaging the interests of employees.
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Research dealing with various aspects of* the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985, 1987) is reviewed, and some unresolved issues are discussed. In broad terms, the theory is found to be well supported by empirical evidence. Intentions to perform behaviors of different kinds can be predicted with high accuracy from attitudes toward the behavior, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control; and these intentions, together with perceptions of behavioral control, account for considerable variance in actual behavior. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control are shown to be related to appropriate sets of salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs about the behavior, but the exact nature of these relations is still uncertain. Expectancy— value formulations are found to be only partly successful in dealing with these relations. Optimal rescaling of expectancy and value measures is offered as a means of dealing with measurement limitations. Finally, inclusion of past behavior in the prediction equation is shown to provide a means of testing the theory*s sufficiency, another issue that remains unresolved. The limited available evidence concerning this question shows that the theory is predicting behavior quite well in comparison to the ceiling imposed by behavioral reliability.
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This paper surveys the development of the American human resource management field from the late 19th century to the start of the 21st century. Important people, ideas and events are identified as are contributing fields of study and schools of thought. Interesting and sometimes revisionist insights emerge, partly because human resource management is defined broadly to include industrial relations and personnel economics. The historical analysis is also used to derive implications for improving the current-day HRM research program.
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Summary This article asserts that any theory or research on fads or fashions in science has to answer three questions clearly and unambiguously. What defines "science"? What defines a "scientific fad" or a "scientific fashion"? What might facilitate the occurrence of scientific fads or fashions so defined? To illustrate this argument, this article critically examines the answers to three questions suggested by Starbuck's article: [Starbuck, W. H. (2009). The constant causes of never-ending faddishness in the behavioral and social sciences. Scandinavian Journal of Management]. The article concludes by discussing the challenges that certain scholars can pose to other scholars who courageously raise the possibility that fads or fashions might hold sway in the behavioral or social sciences.
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We begin by juxtaposing the pervasive presence of technology in organizational work with its absence from the organization studies literature. Our analysis of four leading journals in the field confirms that over 95% of the articles published in top management research outlets do not take into account the role of technology in organizational life. We then examine the research that has been done on technology, and categorize this literature into two research streams according to their view of technology: discrete entities or mutually dependent ensembles. For each stream, we discuss three existing reviews spanning the last three decades of scholarship to highlight that while there have been many studies and approaches to studying organizational interactions and implications of technology, empirical research has produced mixed and often-conflicting results. Going forward, we suggest that further work is needed to theorize the fusion of technology and work in organizations, and that additional perspectives are needed to add to the palette of concepts in use. To this end, we identify a promising emerging genre of research that we refer to under the umbrella term: sociomateriality. Research framed according to the tenets of a sociomaterial approach challenges the deeply taken-for-granted assumption that technology, work, and organizations should be conceptualized separately, and advances the view that there is an inherent inseparability between the technical and the social. We discuss the intellectual motivation for proposing a sociomaterial research approach and point to some common themes evident in recent studies. We conclude by suggesting that a reconsideration of conventional views of technology may help us more effectively study and understand the multiple, emergent, and dynamic sociomaterial configurations that constitute contemporary organizational practices.