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Using Personality Questionnaires for Selection

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Abstract

We begin by setting the scene of personality test use in selection before defining personality, considering why it should be of value in selection, and briefly considering how we arrived at the current state of knowledge in personality research generally. We then examine the predictive validity evidence for personality in selection, considering personality as a single predictor of job performance and as a part of a broader selection programme. We then explore debates regarding what level of the personality hierarchy (broad factors vs. narrow traits) is most useful during selection, whether universal job performance exists or whether different jobs require different behaviours and thus nuanced personality assessment, and we consider the potential utility of ‘other-ratings’ of personality. We then move on from predictive validity and discuss how and when personality measures might be used within a selection programme, and finally, we suggest areas of research that offer great promise for improving our understanding, and subsequently, evidence-based practice within selection.
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... Personality refers to the relatively stable traits that influence a person's typical pattern of thinking, feeling, and behaving (Hughes and Batey, 2017). Given this, trait EI should refer exclusively to typical affective tendencies and not self-perceived abilities, which are distinct from personality (Chamorro-Premuzic and Furnham, 2004). ...
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This second edition provides managers and students the nuts and bolts of assessment processes and selection techniques. With this knowledge, managers learn to make informed personnel decisions based on the results of tests and assessments. The book emphasizes that employee performance predictions require well-formed hypotheses about personal characteristics that may be related to valued behavior at work. It also stresses the need for developing a theory of the attribute one hypothesizes as a predictor—a thought process too often missing from work on selection procedures. Topics such as team-member selection, situational judgment tests, nontraditional tests, individual assessment, and testing for diversity are explored. The book covers both basic and advanced concepts in personnel selection in a straightforward, readable style intended to be used in both undergraduate and graduate courses in Personnel Selection and Assessment.
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“This is a very important book. It is an essential text for any graduate program in applied industrial and organizational psychology. The First Edition is the best text on the market today, and the Second Edition is a huge improvement. Nice work!” – Bill Attenweiler, Northern Kentucky University Thoroughly updated and revised, this Second Edition is the only book currently on the market to present the most important and commonly used methods in human resource management in such detail. The authors clearly outline how organizations can create programs to improve hiring and training, make jobs safer, provide a satisfying work environment, and help employees to work smarter. Throughout, they provide practical tips on how to conduct a job analysis, often offering anecdotes from their own experiences. New to the Second Edition: New co-author Frederick P. Morgeson's background in business management brings a valuable new perspective and balance to the presentation of material.; Expanded coverage is offered on O*NET, strategic job analysis, competencies and competency modeling, and inaccuracy in job analysis ratings.; New text boxes provide bio sketches of famous names in job analysis to put a personal face on research.; Additional examples and cases illustrate the “how-to” of job analysis in real-life settings. Companion Website! A companion website, offers instructors and students supplemental materials such as course syllabi, examples of data collected as part of a job analysis, task inventory data, the opportunity to practice data analysis, and much more!