Designing Games for Children with developmental disabilities in Ambient Intelligence Environments

ArticleinInternational Journal of Child-Computer Interaction 11:40-49 · January 2017with 72 Reads
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Abstract
This paper presents the design process and deployment of interactive games for children within an Ambient Intelligence (AmI) environment. Designing and creating games under the perspective of Ambient Intelligence has the potential to provide enhanced indoor playing experiences to children, as well as maintaining and expanding the applicability of each game as a tool in early intervention services such as preschool and special education. The developed games build on knowledge stemming from the processes and theories used in Occupational Therapy, are capable of monitoring and following the progress of each young player, adapt accordingly and provide important information regarding the abilities and skills of a child and his development over time. The design has been conducted in collaboration with occupational therapists so as to embed aspects of their work and therapeutic procedures.

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