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Abstract

Calophyllum inophyllum Linn. (Clusiaceae) is a medicinal plant, distributed in many countries of the tropics and subtropics. It has an otablenumber of medicinal properties with high curative value. C. inophyllum is very important for its medicinal value. Various parts of this plant such as the leaves, bark, flowers, fruits and seeds were used for the treatment of different ailments in the indigenous system of medicine such as skin diseases, wounds, ulsers, vaginal discharge and the passing of blood after child birth, gonorrhoea, chronic bronchitis, phthisis, sore eyes, heatstroke, migraine and vertigo, and are being employed as antiseptics, astringents, expectorants, diuretics and purgatives particularly in South Asia. Hence, this review focuses on the detailed medicinal uses, phytochemical composition, along with pharmacological properties of this multipurpose C. Inophyllum tree.

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... The bark possesses diuretic, antiseptic, disinfectant, ant neuralgic properties and can act as expectorant when taken internally which is useful in chronic bronchitis and phthisis. It is widely used for treating skin diseases (Shanmugapriya et al. 2016). ...
... Other information: the seeds yield an oil known as Pinnay or Domba oil, used for burning and lubrication. It is widely known as an ornamental plant species as its seeds, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits used for traditional purposes (Shanmugapriya et al. 2016). ...
Thesis
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Morphology of Coastal area shows the natural structure which acts as a shield or defense system by absorbing energy from wave, wind and tide action. These play a key role in protecting the coastal environment from erosion and flooding. Coastal dune flora helps in dune stabilization and restoration as well as act as a natural purifier at coastline. The sand dune comprises of many types of floras with different habits. These floras have a great stress tolerance capabilities and more or less soil binding capacity. However the coastal dunes is degraded or destructed due to lack of exploration of their medicinal values to most of the peoples. Due to development and constant anthropogenic activities along the coastal areas these Coastal Sand Dune floras and its associated vegetation are rapidly eliminated. With this the traditional knowledge is also gradually vanishing. A survey was made during November, 2019 and total 54 plant species were recorded from 33 different families. The experimental plant species (Hydrophylax maritima) was collected and dried to make powder. The plant extract was obtained by the soxhlet method. Then phytochemical screening, TLC and antibacterial activities were carried out against a gram positive bacteria (Streptococcus mutans). The phytochemical assay and TLC were carried out to identify the the bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites present in the plant extract. The phytochemical screening reveal the presence of saponin, tannins and flavonoids in aqueous extrract. The phytochemical and antibacterial activities showed its pharmacological potential.
... The kamani trees grow in tropical areas, counting Pacific islands and Hawaii (Friday et al., 2006). It is a very famous plant, and its leaves, flowers, bark, seeds, and fruits are utilizing as a medication for skin diseases, wounds, ulcers, etc. (Craker et al., 2009;Shanmugapriya, 2016). Kamani seeds usually are produced twice a year, and a tree can produce about 100 kg of fruit containing 18 kg of oil in a year (Dweck & Meadows, 2002). ...
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Many tropical islands, including Aruba, Seychelles, Mauritius, and Pacific Island countries, are entirely dependent on importing fossil fuels to meet their energy demands. Due to global warming, improving energy use efficiency and developing regionally available renewable energy resources are necessary to reduce carbon emissions. This review analyzed and identified biomass feedstocks to produce liquid biofuels targeting tropical islands, particularly focusing on Hawaii as a case study. Transportation and energy generation sectors consume 25.5% and 11.6%, respectively, of Hawaii's imported fossil fuels. Various nonedible feedstocks with information on their availability, production, and average yields of oils, fiber, sugars, and lipid content for liquid biofuels production are identified to add value to the total energy mix. The available biomass conversion technologies and production costs are summarized. In addition, a section on potentially using sewage sludge to produce biodiesel is also included. Based on a comparative analysis of kamani, croton, pongamia, jatropha, energycane, Leucaena hybrid, gliricidia, and eucalyptus feedstock resources, this study proposes that Hawaii and other similar tropical regions can potentially benefit from growing and producing economical liquid biofuels locally, especially for the transportation and electricity generation sectors
... The kamani trees grow in tropical areas, counting Pacific islands and Hawaii (Friday et al., 2006). It is a very famous plant, and its leaves, flowers, bark, seeds, and fruits are utilizing as a medication for skin diseases, wounds, ulcers, etc. (Craker et al., 2009;Shanmugapriya, 2016). Kamani seeds usually are produced twice a year, and a tree can produce about 100 kg of fruit containing 18 kg of oil in a year (Dweck & Meadows, 2002). ...
Article
Full-text available
Many tropical islands, including Aruba, Seychelles, Mauritius, and Pacific Island countries, are entirely dependent on importing fossil fuels to meet their energy demands. Due to global warming, improving energy use efficiency and developing regionally available renewable energy resources are necessary to reduce carbon emissions. This review analyzed and identified biomass feedstocks to produce liquid biofuels targeting tropical islands, particularly focusing on Hawaii as a case study. Transportation and energy generation sectors consume 25.5% and 11.6%, respectively, of Hawaii's imported fossil fuels. Various nonedible feedstocks with information on their availability, production, and average yields of oils, fiber, sugars, and lipid content for liquid biofuels production are identified to add value to the total energy mix. The available biomass conversion technologies and production costs are summarized. In addition, a section on potentially using sewage sludge to produce biodiesel is also included. Based on a comparative analysis of kamani, croton, pongamia, jatropha, energycane, Leucaena hybrid, gliricidia, and eucalyptus feedstock resources, this study proposes that Hawaii and other similar tropical regions can potentially benefit from growing and producing economical liquid biofuels locally, especially for the transportation and electricity generation sectors
... 54,56 Kamani is a well-known ornamental plant species with medicinal properties. Leaves, bark, flowers, fruits, and seeds are used in traditional practices and for the treatment of skin diseases, wounds, ulcers, etc. 57,58 It is a moderately fast growing tree that can attain a height of 1 m tall within a year, can be grown in mixed cultures, and does not require weeding. Kamani is easy to propagate by seed. ...
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There is increasing interest in developing biobased alternative jet fuels to meet rising aviation demand and address environmental concerns. Uncertainty of oil prices, issues of energy security, and rising greenhouse gas concentrations have spurred the development and acceptance of alternative, economically viable, environmentally sustainable production pathways. The objectives of this study were to review alternative jet fuel feedstock candidates and relevant conversion data to provide a baseline of information to be accessed and built upon in developing production scenarios in Hawai'i and other tropical regions bounded by the Tropic of Cancer in the northern hemisphere and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. Seventeen plants that produce oil, fiber, and sugar feedstocks were identified, and information on cultural practices, yield ranges, invasiveness, and mechanization status was assembled. Available data on pretreatment requirements and conversion processes for the 17 feedstocks, including mass and energy balances, product and byproduct yield and quality, and scale requirements/unit sizes, were reviewed. This effort seeks to inform the development and design of alternative jet fuel production along regional supply chains in Hawai'i and other locations in the tropics.
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The inhibitory effects of 22 xanthones from three Guttiferae plants (Hypericum patulum, Calophyllum inophyllum and C. austroindium) on exogenous platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced hypotension were examined using a blood pressure monitoring in vivo assay method. Guanandin (2), caloxanthone E (3), 1,3,5,6-tetrahydroxy-2-isoprenylxanthone (8), 6-deoxyjacareubin (11) and patulone (18) showed strong inhibition of PAF-induced hypotension, with inhibitory effects of more than 60 %. Their ID50 values were greater than that of ginkgolide B (BN-52 021), a natural PAF-antagonist from the Ginkgo biloba.
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicological effects of feeding the oils of Calophyllum inophyllum, Pentaclethra macrophylla and Terminalia catappa to rats. The effects on physical appearance, feed intake, weight gain, plasma and tissue cholesterol and triacyglycerol levels in rats with 5% of the oils in normal rat feed were determined. Weekly monitoring of the rats showed good physical appearance and steady weight gain, with no mortality recorded for the period of the study. Haematological analysis of the rats indicated that they were not anaemic. Histopathotogical examination of the sections of the heart, liver, kidney and spleen revealed moderate (T. catappa oil) to severe fatty change and necrosis in the liver. Glomerulonephrotic changes in the kidneys of rats fed with T. catappa oil were moderate, while it was severe in the group fed with P. macrophylla oil. Severe myocardiac necrosis as well as atherosclerotic clefts in vasa vasori was observed in the vasa vasori of the hearts of rats fed with P. macrophylla oil. This change was moderate in the heart of rats fed with C. inophyllum, while no such observation was made in the group fed with T. catappa oil. There was a significant difference in the plasma cholesterol levels of the rats fed with C. inophyllum and T. catappa oils when compared with the control rats, while those fed with P. macrophylla oil had no significant difference. The oil of T. catappa appears more suitable for consumption than the oils from C. inophyllum and P. macrophylla. Fatty acid analysis of the oils showed that they have high amounts of unsaturated fatty acids with linoleic and oleic acids as the major ones.
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