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In traditional medicine most of the diseases have been treated by administration of plant or plant product. Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the neem compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of neem. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of the neem and some of their compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the neem extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of neem along with their safety evaluation.
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