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Systemic change session: Instructions in preparation of the Nudge Global Leadership Challenge 2016

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Presentation given and systemic change session (based on causal loop modelling + value network analysis) held at the Nudge Global Leadership Challenge 2016: http://www.nudge-global-leadership-challenge.com http://www.nudge-global-leadership-challenge.com/keynote-speakers/#Domenico%20Dentoni http://www.nudge-global-leadership-challenge.com/report-2016/
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Systemic Change Session
Instructions in preparation of the session of 22 October
Nudge Global Leadership Challenge 2016
Systems interventions
for preventing climate change and developing world peace
Personal Introduction
Dear participants,
My name is Domenico Dentoni. I grew up in Italy and lived
in Africa, the US and Australia before becoming professor
in Strategic Change Management at Wageningen
University & Research, where I lead the Global Center
for Food Systems Innovation. This program builds
coherence across multiple partnerships to address global
issues of food security, poverty and climate change.
My travels and work inspired me to participate in the
Nudge Global Leadership Challenge. I’ll be your
instructor for the systemic change session, which will take
place on Saturday morning, October 22, part of the overall
assessment during the Challenge.
I am looking forward to meeting you soon!
Session Introduction
Goal: propose a systemic intervention that enhances peace development, reduction
of climate change and your company profitability.
Method: Participants will be divided in teams of 4 - 5 persons. You will practice a
number of individual and team skills and competencies.
You will undertake three specific actions:
ACTION 1 - Addressing the problems: your team will map problems (e.g. war,
climate change, limited profit) and seek interventions to address them effectively;
ACTION 2 - Building the networks: your team will design new networks that
will catalyze resources and actors needed to address these problems;
ACTION 3 - Presenting your intervention: your team will present your work to
explain both your problem and your network map.
The following slides brief you on these three ACTIONS.
Are you ready to trigger a systemic change?
Planning of the session
You will work under tight time constraint! The session will be organized as follows:
Introduction to the session
10 minutes
ACTION 1: Mapping and addressing the problems 25 minutes
ACTION 2: Mapping and building the networks 25 minutes
Prepare your presentation 5 minutes
ACTION 3: Presenting your systemic intervention 3 minutes
Finalists will present their systemic intervention twice!
Self-reflection on your learning 15 minutes
Nomination of best systemic intervention and feedback 10 minutes
Instructions on ACTION 1
Mapping & addressing the problems
Duration: 25 minutes
You will work as a team and each of you will act on behalf of your own - business, non-
governmental, private or public - organization!
ACTION 1: Mapping the problems
Drug%abuse
Example:
Suppose that, as a team of leaders, you want to reduce drug abuse and criminality in a
neighborhood without increasing public expenditure. Let’s start from a very basic
mapping of the problem:
Public%costs%for%
rehab%programs
Youth%
social%
exclusion
Cultural%
activities%in%
neigh-
borhood
Police%
cenforeme
nt
Criminality
Drug%
availability
-
+
+
+
-
Minus (-) indicates
that you agree that
there is a negative
relationship between
cultural activities and
youth social
exclusion (i.e., the
more cultural
activities, the less
youth social
exclusion)
Plus (+) indicates
that you agree that
there is a positive
relationship between
criminality and drug
availability (i.e., the
more criminality, the
more the drug
availability)
+
ACTION 1: Mapping the problems (cont’d.)
Tips for sketching an insightful map of your problems in a tight time constraint:
1. Prepare in advance: Sketch a map with your initial ideas by linking peace development,
climate change and company profitability;
2. Think broad: Draw many drivers and consequences of your problems. The more you
draw drivers and effects of your problems, the easier it is to find effective systemic
interventions later on;
3. Seek the dilemmas: The problems often involve difficult choices. For example, more
police enforcement reduces criminality but is also likely to increase public expenditure, to
sketch a realistic and sharp map, seek and represent these dilemmas!
Beware: We will use these as criteria to assess your work and give you feedback after the
session!
Want to know more? Read about causal loop modeling and participatory systems dynamics.
ACTION 1: Addressing the problems (cont’d.)
Drug%abuse
Brainstorm on a simple systemic intervention that may effectively reduce drug abuse and
criminality with no increase in public costs: what about a ‘time bank’ and a neighborhood
watch initiative?
Public%costs%for%
rehab%programs
Youth%
social%
exclusion
Cultural%
activities%in%
neigh-
borhood
Police%
enforceme
nt
Criminality
Drug%
Availability
Time%bank%in%
neighborhood
Trust%among%
neighbors
Neighborhood%
watch%
initiative
-
+
+
+
-
+
+
+
-
-
+
In red, add the
intervention(s) (i.e.
one or more) that
you agree that may
lead to an effective
systemic change.
For example,
creation of a time
bank in the
neighborhood may
increase cultural
activities in a
neighborhood,
and thus reduce
social exclusion
and drug abuse.
In red, also add the
expected effects of
your designed
interventions.
For example, the
creation of a time
bank may increase
the level of trust
among neighbors.
Moreover, increased
trust among
neighbors may lead
to create a
neighborhood watch
initiative that may
reduce criminality.
ACTION 1: Addressing the problems (cont’d.)
Tips for adding an effective systemic intervention that addresses your problems in a tight
time constraint:
1. Find the leverage points: Choose an intervention that (directly or indirectly) addresses
multiple drivers of the problems. For example, a time bank in the neighborhood addresses
both criminality and youth social exclusion: one intervention may address two key drivers of
drug abuse;
2. Be cost effective: Choose an intervention that requires a reasonable use of financial
resources or that, if expensive, leads to significant savings of other financial resources.
Similarly, be parsimonious in the use of other scarce resources. It will make your
intervention more realistic;
3. Think disruptively: Seek for innovative interventions that clearly traces a line of
disruption between the status quo and the future.
Beware, we will use these as criteria to assess your work and give you feedback after the session!
ACTION 1: More information? (optional)
The links below present a more complex description of how to map the same problems:
Mapping the problem of drug abuse
Mapping the problem of criminality
General literature on dealing with societal problems, mapping and addressing them through
systems thinking and purposive collaboration:
Tackling wicked problems in sustainability through collaboration
Introduction to systems thinking and causal loop diagrams
Guidelines to build causal loop diagrams
Nobody has all the answers, but together we can find them
Instructions on ACTION 2
Mapping and building the networks
Duration: 25 minutes
You will work as a team and each of you will act on behalf of your own - business, non-
governmental, private or public - organization!
ACTION 2: Mapping the networks
Next question: How can you effectively put a systemic intervention into practice?
In particular, what are the actors and resources needed to get it done? Let’s start from
mapping the existing networks:
Municipality
Families
Police
Youth
Drug%Gangs
Central%
Government
K, F
F C
F
C
H, F
H
H, F
K, F
Bubbles: the actors.
Arrows: direction of the
shared resources (e.g.
municipality gives resources to
police).
Bi-directional arrow: a
resource exchange (e.g. central
government and municipality
exchange knowledge and
funding through taxes and
public investments).
Key resources are indicated
with letters:
H = hierarchy, laws, rules
F = financial capital, i.e.
money
C = commodities (i.e.
products and services)
K = knowledge
ACTION 2: Building the networks
To finalize your systemic intervention, add the actors and resources needed to put your
systemic intervention into practice. E.g. a neighborhood association may need networks and
resource exchange with many actors to operate a time bank and/or a neighborhood watch
initiative!
Municipality
Families
Police
Youth
Drug%Gangs
Central%
Government
Neighborhood%
Association
K, F
F C
FC
H, F
H
H, F
K, F
K
Violence
Protection
K
K
K, F
K
F
You can add more new actors
that you would like to engage
with to put your systemic
intervention into practice.
Which resources would be
needed? Imagine both the
intended and unintended
resource exchange:
Drug gangs may exercise
violence on the new
association, therefore the
association may need
protection from police.
In exchange, the
association can give
knowledge to police.
Finally, to function effectively, the association may also
need a resource (e.g., knowledge and financial capital)
exchange with youth, families, municipality and police.
What other actor or resource would you add in this case?
ACTION 2: Building the networks (cont’d.)
Tips for mapping and building effective networks that address your problems in a tight
time constraint:
1. Think disruptively: Who are the new actors that could make your systemic intervention
effective - where “new” means “not in the map yet, but to be added”-? What are the new
resources: a new technology, new knowledge, or new ways of organizing and sharing
existing resources?;
2. Map strategically: Focus on mapping only actors and resources that you consider
critical and disruptive for your systemic intervention;
3. Shift power structures: When few actors share many resources (and the other actors
share few resources) this is a signal that there are power imbalances. Think of
interventions that shift resources, and thus power, towards actors that do not have them.
Beware: we will use these as criteria to assess your work and give you feedback after the session!
ACTION 2: More information? (cont’d.)
The link below present a very basic description of value network analysis as a tool for
mapping and building new networks to address systemic problems:
Applying value network analysis to address poverty and food insecurity in Africa
General literature on building networks and new organizational forms for sustainability from
a systems-thinking perspective:
Business models for sustainability from a systems perspective
Building value network analysis for mapping tangible and intangible resources
A participatory approach to value network analysis
Instructions on ACTION 3
Presenting your systemic intervention
During the session, you will present your team work performed in Action 1 and Action 2.
Duration: 3 minutes
If you will be nominated as one of the four finalist teams, then you will repeat your
presentation. Duration: 3 minutes
ACTION 3: Presenting your intervention (cont’d.)
Present your systemic intervention with the two maps that you drew for Action 1 and Action
2. It’s impossible to present all the info in the map in 3 minutes, so just focus on the most
remarkable and insightful points of your team work!
Click here to learn how to communicate complex messages effectively.
ACTION 3: Presenting your intervention (cont’d.)
Tips for presenting the insights from your problem and network maps in just three
minutes:
1. Be concise yet expressive: choose carefully what to say and how to say it. Underline with
your voice and nonverbal communication what are your most interesting insights: what your
audience should really keep in mind from your maps;
2. Be critical and reflexive: reflect and let your audience reflect: who would benefit and
who would lose from your systemic intervention? What are the aspects of your map that may
attract criticisms or may be difficult to implement? This will give a realistic, non-naive
picture;
3. Focus on ripple effects: highlight how your intervention will really make system change
happen. While your intervention will have some direct effects, make sure that you
communicate its indirect effects.
Beware: we will use these as criteria to assess your work and give you feedback after the session!
Conclusion
What have we learned during this session?
Individual competencies
Systems thinking?
Active listening?
Complex communication?
Others?
Team competencies
Synthesis?
Dialectics?
Dealing with dilemmas?
Others?
Best of luck with your preparation!
Questions on the content of this session?
Do not hesitate to contact me:
Dr. Domenico Dentoni
professor in Strategic Change Management, Wageningen University
domenico.dentoni@wur.nl| Website
... Empathy mapping (Gray, 2018) was used as a tool to do so.This initiated the boundary crossing process between the African students and the owner-manager. Based on this information, identified problems were mapped by groups of five to six students by using causal loop mapping as a method and to visualize their initial analysis (Dentoni, 2016;Kirkwood, 1998). Subsequently these problem maps, supported with a short video pitch by a representative of each student team, were posted on the Facebook group page created for this project. ...
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ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.