Article

Abacavir/lamivudina + atazanavir no potenciado en la práctica clínica diaria: doce años de experiencia

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Abstract

Objective: To describe the experience using the combination abacavir, lamivudine plus non-boosted atazanavir (ABC/3TC+ATV) in a group of pretreated patients. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective observational study to describe baseline characteristics and the evolution of patients who had received or were treating with ABC/3TC+ATV, from November 2004 and June 15th 2015, in the clinical setting. Results: Overall, 236 patients were included in the study. Median age (IQR) was 45 (42-50) years and 69% were male. The main reasons for using this combination were previous toxicity in 130 patients (56%), simplification in 60 (20%) and virologic failure in 29 (14%). Previous treatment was based in boosted protease inhibitor in 115 patients (48.7%), 3 analogs in 56 (28%) and non-analogous based in 19 (8.1%). Median treatment length was 2.2 years (IQR0.8-5.3). A total of 66 (28%) patients continue receiving ABC/3TC+ATV (median time 5.7, IQR2.2-8.3), treatment was changed in 170 patients (72%) (median time 1.6 years, IQR0.7-3.6), and 22 (9.3%) patients were lost. Virological failure was assessed in 30 patients. Conclusion: In selected patients, ABC/3TC+ATV is a durable and attractive therapeutic alternative.

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