BookPDF Available

How the Brahmins Won: From Alexander to the Guptas

Authors:
A preview of the PDF is not available
... It all depends on the use one wishes to make of the texts. 1 Dumont is not a good example of how sociology and Indology could collaborate. He adopted romantic notions from contemporary Indology to attribute individuality to the renouncers of ancient India (Bronkhorst 1997, 2016). This was not an enrichment of the sociology of early India, nor did it help Indologists step beyond their prejudices (or dreams). ...
... It all depends on the use one wishes to make of the texts. 1 Dumont is not a good example of how sociology and Indology could collaborate. He adopted romantic notions from contemporary Indology to attribute individuality to the renouncers of ancient India (Bronkhorst 1997, 2016). This was not an enrichment of the sociology of early India, nor did it help Indologists step beyond their prejudices (or dreams). ...
Article
The Udyoga parvan’s framing narrative about Indra, Viśvarūpa, Vṛtra, and Nahuṣa is crafted to facilitate the translation of the Vedic paradigm of sovereignty into a sāṃkhya-yoga idiom. This essay reads the ‘The Victory of Indra’ as a rhetorical device that introduces a correlation between a sovereign’s bigness and brilliance—key metrics of Vedic sovereignty—and his buddhi. Through the practice of sensory restraint and (or as a kind of) brahmacarya, the Udyoga’s sovereign swells his buddhi to a point of identification with the comprehensive greatness of his realm. He further wards off mental/consumptive afflictions like distraction, lust, or pride, sustaining his rule through the vigilant observance of a brahman-centred habit. As a result, his buddhi is like a well-fed fire whose light comprehends the realm that he thereby rules with the clear understanding of the stable, expansive, and dharma-aligned force of brahman.
Article
Studies on Indian communities which were denigrated as lower castes and untouchables are yet to fully unravel their cultural, religious, economic, and historical perceptions and practices in India. Scholarship that is sympathetic to the oppressed of caste-power have engaged with caste prejudice and bodily violence under the colonial and postcolonial states. But the questions of language, literature, philosophy, migration, knowledge traditions, and intrinsic cultural self-identity of these discriminated Indians have largely remained unanalysed. In contrast, based on ethnographic field study in Hubli, Karnataka and in northern Tamil Nadu, this article argues that the memory of the marginalized is key to unravelling their alternative cultural and religious history beyond caste. It shows that, on the one hand, the ancient Tamil Buddhist literary corpus forms the deep cultural memory of the marginalized Tamils, while on the other, the organic Buddhist intellectuals, writers, publishers, and practitioners, and their discursive and non-discursive practices have perpetuated the communicative memory of being the descendants of ancient Buddhism. This article further argues that this memory of marginalized Indians points to their sense of castelessness in modern South India.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.