Article

Familialistische vs. individualistische Partnerwahl. Eine Untersuchung der Partnerschaftsqualität bei türkischstämmigen Personen.

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Abstract

Zusammenfassung Der Beitrag vergleicht die Partnerschaftsqualität von Personen, deren Familie an der Partnerwahl beteiligt war (familialistischer Modus), mit Personen, die ihre Partnerwahl allein entschieden haben (individualistischer Modus). Es werden Türkischstämmige in Berlin (n=218) untersucht. Die Befragung fand 2009 als Begleitstudie des deutschen Familien- und Beziehungspanels pairfam statt. Als Methode werden Strukturgleichungsmodelle eingesetzt, um vermittelte Effekte zwischen dem Partnerwahlmodus und der Partnerschaftsqualität testen zu können. Die Befunde zeigen ein ähnlich hohes Niveau der globalen Partnerschaftsqualität in beiden Partnerwahlmodi, weisen jedoch auf unterschiedliche Wirkpfade hin. Personen mit einer familialistischen Partnerwahl haben Zugang zu mehr familiären Ressourcen. Personen mit einer individualistischen Partnerwahl haben eine höhere Paarinteraktionsqualität. Familiäre Ressourcen und Paarinteraktionsqualität wirken sich positiv auf die Partnerschaftsqualität aus, so dass sich die darüber vermittelten Effekte beider Partnerwahlmodi gegenseitig ausgleichen.

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The article aims to present the results of a comparative analysis of cohabitation biographies (marital, non-marital and pre-marital cohabitation) between Germans without a migration background and Turkish nationals in Germany. To this end, the data of the Generations and Gender Surveys (GGS) from 2005 and 2006 (for Turkish citizens) are used. The results show a fundamentally different lifestyle of Turks in comparison to Germans, in particular within the younger age groups: Turks more seldom have more than one cohabitation, and have shorter pre-marital phases. Non-marital cohabitation is for Turks more seldom an alternative to marriage. All in all, a major change takes place among Germans from older to younger cohorts as to their experience of nonmarital cohabitation, the latter having become the norm among the latter in the course of a biography. This change is virtually unknown among Turks. The age and cohort, the level of education, religiosity and acceptance of non-marital cohabitation impact the experience of non-marital co-habitation.
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This study examines changes in leisure patterns across the transition to parenthood for dual-earner, working-class couples, as well as the relationship between leisure and marital quality. To this end, 147 heterosexual couples were interviewed across the transition to parenthood. Findings indicate that during the transition to parenthood, husbands and wives experience an initial decline in leisure, followed by a gradual incline after the wife's return to work. Overall, wives who reported more shared leisure prenatally also reported more marital love and less conflict 1 year later. Husbands with more independent leisure prenatally reported less love and more conflict 1 year later. Conclusions suggest leisure time is integral to well-functioning marriages, with effects lasting throughout the first year of parenthood.
Marital Happiness Marital Duration and the U - Shaped Curve Social van Zantvliet Parental Involvement in Partner Choice : The Case of Turks and Moroccans in the Netherlands
  • VanLaningham