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The Continuous House: A View from the Deep Past (2000)

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... There, fires were set to the tholoi reaching sufficiently high temperatures to partially transform the structures' calcareous structural components into quicklime, resulting in burnt lime covering the burnt skeletons. Destruction of domestic houses by fire during the Neolithic in Europe, Anatolia and the Levant is sometimes interpreted as a heightened perceptual drama, giving rise to personal memories and emotions in its former inhabitants as well as in the entire community (Akkermans et al., 2012;Brück, 1999;Burdo et al., 2013;Campbell, 2000;Chapman, 1999:114;Harrison, 2008;Mellart, 1964;Noble, 2006:57–58;Özdoğan and Özdoğan, 1998;Russell, 2002;Sheridan, 2013;Smyth, 2006;Stevanović, 1997Stevanović, , 2002Tringham, 2000Tringham, , 2005Tringham, , 2013Twiss et al., 2008;Verhoeven, 2010). Periodic closure rituals of domestic and mortuary structures sometimes followed by rebuilding were played out in order to ensure the creation and continuity of place, the construction of social memory and group identity (Borić, 2008:123–124, 129– 130; Bradley, 1998:51–80;Gerritsen, 1999Gerritsen, , 2008Jones, 2007:108– 121; RojoGuerra et al., 2010;Stevanović, 1997:385, 387–388, 2002:58–59;Thomas, 2000;Tringham, 2000Tringham, , 2013:102–103, 106– 108) and the transformation of the dead into ancestors and maintaining relationships with them (Chapman, 1999). ...
... Destruction of domestic houses by fire during the Neolithic in Europe, Anatolia and the Levant is sometimes interpreted as a heightened perceptual drama, giving rise to personal memories and emotions in its former inhabitants as well as in the entire community (Akkermans et al., 2012;Brück, 1999;Burdo et al., 2013;Campbell, 2000;Chapman, 1999:114;Harrison, 2008;Mellart, 1964;Noble, 2006:57–58;Özdoğan and Özdoğan, 1998;Russell, 2002;Sheridan, 2013;Smyth, 2006;Stevanović, 1997Stevanović, , 2002Tringham, 2000Tringham, , 2005Tringham, , 2013Twiss et al., 2008;Verhoeven, 2010). Periodic closure rituals of domestic and mortuary structures sometimes followed by rebuilding were played out in order to ensure the creation and continuity of place, the construction of social memory and group identity (Borić, 2008:123–124, 129– 130; Bradley, 1998:51–80;Gerritsen, 1999Gerritsen, , 2008Jones, 2007:108– 121; RojoGuerra et al., 2010;Stevanović, 1997:385, 387–388, 2002:58–59;Thomas, 2000;Tringham, 2000Tringham, , 2013:102–103, 106– 108) and the transformation of the dead into ancestors and maintaining relationships with them (Chapman, 1999). Various examples suggest that similar to fire, lime is also perceived as a transformative material, regenerating social memory and identity, and endowed with ambivalent qualities. ...
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... Kahn 2007;Kahn and Kirch 2013;Kuijt 2018;Kuijt et al. 2011;Schortman and Urban 2011), but most have rather emphasized its unity, continuity, and perpetuity over its potential for dispersal (e.g. Boric 2007;Chesson 2003Chesson , 2007Craig 2007;Gillespie 2000cGillespie , 2011Hendon 2010;Hodder 2007;Hodder and Cessford 2004;Joyce 2007Joyce , 2011King 2011;Kirch 2000;Marshall 2000;Tringham 2000;Watkins 2012). As Lévi-Strauss' definition implies, the notions of precedence, longevity, and perpetuity of the corporate body (personne morale) represent fundamental values of House societies (Gillespie 2000a(Gillespie :12-14, 2000b. ...
... Dlhodobý výskum tohto javu podporil myšlienku domácnosti, v rámci ktorej obydlia vystupovali ako samostatné jednotky sociálnej reprodukcie a pri ich zániku bol každý jeden oheň založený ako samostatný požiar Tringham 1994). Neskôr bola táto teória ešte rozvinutá, a to do takej podoby, že umiestnenie každého spáleného domu predstavovalo symbolickú pohrebnú hranicu domácnosti (Chapman 1999;Stefanović 2002;Tringham 2000;. Stretávame sa však aj s odlišnými názormi, ktoré považujú vyhorenie domov (resp. ...
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The domestic unit is inseparable from its homestead, and the 'house', at once a physical place and a social unit, is often also a unit of production and consumption, a cult group, and even a political faction. Inspired by Lévi-Strauss's suggestion that the multi-functional noble houses of medieval Europe were simply the best-known examples of a widespread social institution, the contributors to this collection analyse 'house' systems in Southeast Asia and South America, exploring the interrelationships between buildings, people, and ideas. They reveal some of the ways in which houses can stand for social groups and serve as images of process and order.
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[Book Review of]: Peter J. Wilson's "The Domestication of the Human Species". Yale University Press, 1989. xvi + 201 pp., references, index. From the review: "Wilson’s insightful and engaging volume poses the question: What are the social consequences of sedentary life? The trail of discussion down which this question leads him and down which he in turn leads the reader is both fascinating and productive. . . . Wilson’s study is both concise and far-reaching and will provide an important new stimulus to anthropologists interested in the origins and evolution of houses and house-life and their implications for the understanding of human society." —Michael Blake, Anthropologica
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