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The Digital Editions Catalogue App: A web application to browse, curate and analyze digital editions

Authors:

Abstract

Since 2012 Greta Franzini’s Catalogue of Digital Editions has been gathering digital editions in an attempt to survey and identify best practice in the field of digital scholarly editing. Other cataloguing initiatives did not, and do not, provide the granular analysis of features necessary to understand the rationale and methodology behind the creation of an edition. The Catalogue is useful as it provides an accessible record of standards (including TEI) and building tools used, and thus an insight into past and present projects. Originally published as an open Google Sheet, in 2015 the Catalogue moved to GitHub as a comma-separated-value file in order to take advantage of its stable versioning system. This format lends itself well to data download and contribution but not to efficient browsing. In 2016, a web application was developed to deliver the .csv Catalogue data to users in an interactive and user-friendly manner. This Django-based application allows users to browse, search, filter and order the Catalogue around their research interests, but also to curate existing data and create new entries through a custom mode web front-end. The application also provides statistics and visualisations derived from the data (e.g. map visualisations), as well as the possibility to download and query it via an API. With the Digital Editions Catalogue Web Application the authors wish to establish a solid and usable platform to collect homogeneous and structured information about digital scholarly editing. The 2016 TEI Conference would provide the perfect setting for an official launch of this collaboration.
Detailed overview of project features.
To enhance the usability of the Catalogue for
desktop and mobile devices.
https://dig-ed-cat.eos.arz.oeaw.ac.at/
To identify best practice in digital (scholarly) editing
and provide a record of extant digital (scholarly)
editions.
Peter Andorfer and Ksenia Zaytseva.
[Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities, Vienna;
Peter.Andorfer@oeaw.ac.at; Ksenia.Zaytseva@oeaw.ac.at]
Who?
Python web framework Django and a MySQL
database. Please consult the application’s code
repository on GitHub for the full technical
documentation at
https://github.com/acdh-oeaw/dig_ed_cat
User-friendly browsing, interactive visualisations of
the data, data enrichment and referencing (GND,
Geonames), and an API.
What?
Comma Separated Value (*.csv) file, openly available
via GitHub. A wiki provides information about how the
Catalogue is organised. Users may suggest editions
for inclusion and can correct inconsistencies.
Why?
2016-ongoing
2012-ongoing
Where?
Who?
Why?
How?
What?
https://github.com/gfranzini/digEds_cat
Franzini, G., Mahony, S., and Terras, M. (2016) ‘A Catalogue of Digital Editions’,
In: Pierazzo, E. and Driscoll, M. J. (eds.) Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories and Practices. Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, pp. 161-182.
TEI Conference, 26th-30th September 2016, Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna
Web Application
Data Collection
Greta Franzini - with occasional external contributions.
[UCL Centre for Digital Humanities & University of Göttingen;
g.franzini.11@ucl.ac.uk]
When?
Where?
When?
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Chapter
Full-text available
Since the earliest days of hypertext, textual scholars have produced, discussed and theorised upon critical digital editions of manuscripts, in order to investigate how digital technologies can provide another means to present and enable the interpretative study of text. This work has generally been done by looking at particular case studies or examples of critical digital editions, and, as a result, there is no overarching understanding of how digital technologies have been employed across the full range of textual interpretations. This chapter will describe the creation of a catalogue of digital editions that could collect information about extant digital editions and, in so doing, contribute to research in related disciplines. The resulting catalogue will provide a means of answering, in the form of a quantitative survey, the following research questions: What makes a good digital edition? What features do digital editions share? What is the state of the art in the field of digital editions? Why are there so few electronic editions of ancient texts, and so many of texts from other periods? By collecting data regarding existing digital editions, and corresponding directly with the projects in question, we provide a unique record of extant digital critical editions of text across a range of subject areas, and show how this collaboratively edited catalogue can benefit the Digital Humanities community.
Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna Web Application Data Collection Greta Franzini -with occasional external contributions
  • Tei Conference
TEI Conference, 26th-30th September 2016, Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna Web Application Data Collection Greta Franzini -with occasional external contributions.