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Manufactured Nanomaterials by 2030 - Workplace health and safety consequences in small businesses in France

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The question of preventing occupational risks linked to manufactured nanomaterials, a perfect example of an innovative product, in very small businesses, be they geared to research or production or whether they use these products, is consistent with issues addressed by the France Stratégie report: innovation – particularly in very small businesses – and respect for the individual, at his or her work station in particular, along with the creation of products that are safe for the environment. This study, like those to follow, was conducted jointly by experts from different fields, as forward-looking research requires, in partnership with several organisations (Anses, CARSAT Alsace-Moselle, École des Ponts ParisTech, Institut Jean Lamour, InVS, ISSA, Suva, Université de Bretagne-Sud), in line with INRS’s role as a partner in the occupational risk prevention network at the French and European level. We would like to thank all of the experts and participants in this project, and the team which prepared this seminar over the last several months. We wish you an enjoyable and productive seminar.
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