Article

Condom-Use by Students in a Higher Educational Institution in South Eastern Nigeria

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Abstract

Objective: To examines the prevalence and pattern of condom-use among Nigerian university undergraduates. Methods: This is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 276 undergraduate students from Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria, selected using simple random sampling method. Data analysis employed SPSS version 17.0. Results: There were 168 (60.9%) males and 108 (39.1%) females’ respondents. Their age ranged from 16 to 35 years. Majority, 242 (87.7%) were single and most, 266 (96.4%) were Christians. Up to 266 (96.4%) and 172 (62.3%) were aware of male and female condoms respectively, while 198 (68.8%) respondents and 14 (5.1%) have ever used male and female condoms respectively. Eighty (42.1%) respondents were consistent with condom-use, while 150 (54.3%) and 78 (28.3%) of the respondents respectively, knew condoms could help prevent STIs, and pregnancy. Religion-belief 26 (33.3%) constituted the commonest inhibitor to condom-use. The most commonly known pitfall on condom-use by the respondents is ‘’condom-burst’’ 102 (37.0%). The most common source of information on condom-use by the respondents is media 88(31.9%). Conclusion: Awareness of condom among the respondents was high, but usage was low. Religion constitute a major inhibitor to condom-use. Re-invigorating sexual and reproductive health enlightenment including condom-use, employing various media platforms is recommended.

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... The South-South region followed with an average awareness of 89.3% conducted among 900 respondents made up of both males and females 14 . The South-Eastern region reported lowest awareness rates in the three sets of studies; 76.7%, 62.3%, and 61.4% [23][24][25][26] , with an average of 66.8%. The three studies that reported awareness among women showed a wide variation of awareness: ranging from 40.6% to 93.1% in married women 20,27 and 65.5% among women of unspecified marital status 28. ...
... Seven studies, which were conducted among undergraduate students showed a wide range of frequency of FC use between 1.9% and 11.3% in the South-Western region 19,21,22 . A similar pattern was reported from the South-Eastern region where use ranged from 3.0% to 15.9% 23,25,26 . The trend is not different in the South-South region, with an 8.9% average FC use 14 . ...
... While most male respondents cited the prevention of STIs, including HIV as a reason for using the FC 26 , others cited unwanted pregnancy 21 . Slightly over half of the female respondents (55%) 14,20,22,31,32 used it because they wanted to prevent unwanted pregnancies (Fig. 3a), 31% used it to prevent STIs, including HIV 21,23,26 and 28.3% used it based on their male partner's acceptance 14,21,25 (Fig. 3a). Some (14%) used it for other reasons (Fig. 3); such as having sex with a non-regular partner (22.1%) 25 child spacing (56.9%) 32 , to meet the sexual needs of the partner irrespective of the woman's menstrual cycle 33 or for fun (17.7% and 28%, respectively) 22,23 . ...
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Background: The female condom (FC) is a critical component in a comprehensive and sustainable approach to prevent HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. Objectives: This review provides comprehensive information about Nigerian's knowledge and use of FC. Methods: We screened search output, evaluated study eligibility, and extracted data in duplicate. Data from similar studies were combined in a meta-analysis. Results: There was a significantly (p < 0.0001) high-level of awareness amongst the respondents. However, the use of the FC was very low at 5.5% among female respondents. There was a significant (p < 0.0001) difference between FC awareness and use. The main reasons for FC use were prevention of unintended pregnancy (55%) and STIs/HIV (31%). We observed a significant difference between reasons of non-use of the FC [F (5, 13) = 5.195, P = 0.0077]. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the sources of information on FC [F (3, 8) = 32.89, P < 0.0001]. Conclusion: Despite the high levels of awareness, especially among the female respondents, the use of the FC has remained extremely low even among the young, educated undergraduate students. There is aneed for robust and consistent advocacy to make the FC available and affordable.
... However, a significant percentage does not consistently use condom during sexual intercourse [9]. In south eastern Nigeria, 96.4% of undergraduate know how to use the male condom and only 68.8% undergraduates have ever used it before [20]. Another study reported that only 47.3% of undergraduates in southern Nigeria use male condom consistently [21]. ...
... A study among students in south-south Nigeria reported a low practice of condom use and is barely boarded about sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancies [9]. Studies have also reported that only 33.2% of students in Ethiopia [22] and 30% of students in China [17] sexual satisfaction and hinders sexual interest [11] Another study among undergraduates in south eastern Nigeria showed that religious belief (33.3%) was the commonest reason why most undergraduates don't use condom [20]. ...
... A study among undergraduates in south eastern Nigeria reported that 62% of the students were aware of female condom however only 5.1% of students have ever used a female condom [20]. Another study among undergraduates however reported that 64.3% of undergraduates had knowledge of female condom, however only 32.9% of respondents agreed that female condom can protect against STDs, HIV [23]. ...
... [1] Students 79,7% declared that they use condoms, results near percentage founded by Sobze Martin Sanou and coll. (76%), and higher than that of Mahamane Sanil LA/Niger (58%) [11]; almost half of investigated students (42,0%) use condoms on each occasional sexual relation: these results are less than those founded in France [4] on the third national investigation on student's health (78%) but less than those of Adinma JIB (22,1%) in Nigeria [12]; 18,5% use it systematically, this result is less than the Adinma JIB's who find 42,1% [12]; more than the half use it from a long time. They procure them from a pharmacy (39,1%), a hospital (17,4%), an authorized distributor (14,9%). ...
... [1] Students 79,7% declared that they use condoms, results near percentage founded by Sobze Martin Sanou and coll. (76%), and higher than that of Mahamane Sanil LA/Niger (58%) [11]; almost half of investigated students (42,0%) use condoms on each occasional sexual relation: these results are less than those founded in France [4] on the third national investigation on student's health (78%) but less than those of Adinma JIB (22,1%) in Nigeria [12]; 18,5% use it systematically, this result is less than the Adinma JIB's who find 42,1% [12]; more than the half use it from a long time. They procure them from a pharmacy (39,1%), a hospital (17,4%), an authorized distributor (14,9%). ...
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Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have high vulnerability among adolescents and youth. To determine the pattern of STIs among undergraduates in a Nigeria University. Cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 276 simple-randomly-selected Nigeria undergraduate students. Most respondents 164(59.4%) were aged between 20 and 24 years, and majority were single 242(87.7%). Many, 130(47.1%) could not remember their source of information on STIs, although the media was the source in 80(29.0%) respondents. Altogether 26(9.4%) respondents had had STI in the past one year, of which 18(69.2%) had more than one episode. Eight (30.8%) respondents apiece believed that they contracted the infection from regular and non-regular partners respectively, and 6(23.1%), from commercial sex worker. The commonest mode of presentation was painful micturition and genital discharge, occurring in 8(30.8%) cases apiece. Only 10(38.5%) of respondents with history of STIs received treatment from the doctor following a laboratory investigation; 10(38.5%) had self-medication while the remaining 6(23.1%) received treatment from quacks. The prevalence of STIs among tertiary-institution students is high, and many practices self-medication. Public health enlightenment of youths and adults alike, on the risks of STIs, the dangers of self-medication and the benefits of safe-sex practices is recommended.
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Aim: The study was conducted to assess level of awareness and use of female condoms among young Nigerian women. Methods: A total of 435 young and single Nigerian women (comprising 261 female undergraduate students and 174 rural resident women) were recruited for this study. A structured questionnaire was administered to all participating subjects. Results. Awareness of the female condom was significantly higher among female undergraduate students (93.7%) than rural resident women (5.2%) (OR=280.73, 95%CI =121.15, 650.52; P=0.0001). No significant difference was observed in level of use of the female condom between female undergraduate students (1.9%) and rural resident women (0%) P = 0.1624.The media and friends were the most effective sources of information of female condom among female undergraduate students and rural resident women respectively. Preference for male condoms was given as reason for non use of the female condoms among both groups studied. Rural women's perception of the function of female condoms was largely on the premise of prevention of pregnancy. Conclusion: Female condom use among young and sexually active Nigerian women is poor. Strong grassroot intervention, interpersonal communication and elimination of inhibiting cultural and social beliefs are key to promoting increased female condom use in Nigeria.
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Citation: Adinma JIB, Adinma ED, Eke NO, Umeononihu OS (2016) Condom-Use by Students in a Higher Educational Institution in South Eastern Nigeria. J Comm Pub Health Nurs 2: 127. doi:10.4172/jcphn.1000127