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Adaptability Metric Analysis for Multi-Mission Design of Manufactured Products and Systems

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Abstract

Adaptability in manufacturing is becoming increasingly important, as it provides flexibility without requiring significant up-front investment. In this paper, we review the history of this concept, indicate issues with prior work and advance our knowledge of this topic. We provide an explanation and analysis on the concept of mission-based adaptability that adopts a similar definition as the adaptability in ecosystems, which describes a system's adaptive capability relative to on-going changes. Our analysis shows the mission-based adaptability's empirical mathematical properties and indicates this formulation is able to resolve previous approaches’ issues at an optimal level of abstraction. We employ extensive tools and analysis on an airplane engine design example case and demonstrate the importance and usefulness of the adaptability metric for decision makers in the manufacturing industry.2

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... Recognition of the need for adaptable IT solutions to operate effectively in the dynamic business environment has led to a growing interest among researchers and practitioners to highlight the importance of ES adaptability and to support the development of more adaptable ESs using emerging technologies [3], [23], [25], [58], [59]. ...
... It is less clear whether these managers consider the potential adaptability of the ES they choose to implement. Several studies have made a case for designing systems for adaptability [23], [25], [58], [59]. Kasarda et al. [80], for example, called for the adoption of a new methodology, 'design for adaptability' (DFAD), to influence the development of sustainable technology. ...
... Fayad et al. [81] recommended the development of more adaptable and scalable architectures that can accommodate the evolving nature of technological development and reduce costs associated with software development. Zhu [58] argued that good system design must be adaptable and offered a design method that takes adaptability into account. ...
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