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empowering global citizens

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Abstract

A discussion of the practice of global citizenship education with a comprehensive multidisciplinary K-12 global citizenship curriculum aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the World Economic Forum Risk Assessment Framework
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The chapter examines the difficult conditions under which states, and municipalities had to struggle to ensure learning continued during the social isolation demanded by the COVID-19 crisis in the country. Although it seemed reasonable to expect that the Federal government would respect the constitution and coordinate the educational response to the pandemic, that simply did not happen. The Minister of Education did not consider that such a responsibility should be carried out at the federal level. In the absence of leadership from the central government, the two organizations that congregate subnational secretaries decided to support their members and promote the exchange of practices, with some support from civil society organizations. Through the think tank established by the senior author of this chapter at a private university, CEIPE- Center for Excellence and Innovation in Education Policies, at the Getúlio Vargas Foundation, she participated in this effort, mentoring state and municipal level secretaries in their efforts to provide distance learning through a combination of media, such as TV, radio, and digital platforms. The chapter includes her own anecdotal observations of this national effort, drawing on interviews with secretaries and their teams as well as documents related to the experience as the evidence basis of the chapter. Unfortunately, this is not a story of triumph, since Brazil has been one of the countries with more months of schools being completely or partially closed. In addition to the ineffective approach to fighting the disease, which made Brazil’s rate of infection and deaths much worse than many countries in Latin America, the fact that mayoral elections coincided with COVID-19, introduced political reasons for schools to remain closed. The final part of the chapter draws lessons learned and discusses future possibilities for the future of education in Brazil.
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In this chapter, we identify the need for a curriculum that is intended to not only enable educators to teach about climate change, but to also foster leaders who can engage in policy analysis and civic action related to the issue of climate change. Unlike Chap. 3, which details a whole-school approach, we have specifically focused our attention on developing a curriculum with an associated implementation plan since the ability of teachers to build transferable leadership skills in younger generations are integral to any larger reform initiative. Ultimately, the efficacy of the curriculum is enhanced by a more holistic approach to the prioritization of climate change action in the context of schools and broader education systems, so a synthesis of approaches is recommended.
Conference Paper
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Universities and other centers of learning are joining with the United Nations and other international institutions to further the study of significant issues that are affecting the lives of people across the globe. Ministries of education in various countries want to have their students develop an understanding of the concept of global citizenship and the connections between the peoples of our increasingly intertwined world. In line with this, many educational institutions are including global issues education in their curricula. The English language is the predominant language of international business, globalization, medicine, international education, and politics. Billions of people are studying and using English daily. Can language teachers play a part in promoting global citizenship and creating a peaceful and sustainable world? This paper aims to answer that question and to address vital principles involved in the creation of activities and teaching materials that merge global issues content and language education. It will also provide examples of how teachers can combine content education and critical thinking skills in ways that develop grammatical knowledge and the traditional skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
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Unless schools effectively develop tolerance, cosmopolitanism, deep knowledge of global affairs and a commitment to peace, the likelihood of the civilizational clashes predicted by Samuel Huntington will increase."
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This paper discusses the findings of the 2012 PISA study for the United States in comparative perspective. It proposes that a limited approach to school improvement (standards based reform) accounts for the underperformance of US students relative to comparable education systems, and argues that greater attention is needed to teacher professional development and to school improvement.
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This article examines the relationship between global competence and second language learning motivation in critical language classrooms. Data were collected from 137 participants who were studying critical languages (Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian) at two universities on the East and West Coasts of the United States, using a 30-item Likert scale survey. There was a positive relationship between global competence and second language motivation, as well as between global competence and the components that are seen as constituting second language learning motivation.
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Educators and policymakers increasingly pursue programs that aim to strengthen democracy through civic education, service learning, and other pedagogies. Their underlying beliefs, however, differ. This article calls attention to the spectrum of ideas about what good citizenship is and what good citizens do that are embodied in democratic education programs. It offers analyses of a 2-year study of educational programs in the United States that aimed to promote democracy. Drawing on democratic theory and on findings from their study, the authors detail three conceptions of the “good” citizen—personally responsible, participatory, and justice oriented—that underscore political implications of education for democracy. The article demonstrates that the narrow and often ideologically conservative conception of citizenship embedded in many current efforts at teaching for democracy reflects not arbitrary choices but, rather, political choices with political consequences.
Article
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Fernando M. Reimers and Connie K. Chung discuss how violent conflict relates to education. They argue that the relationship between education and conflict need to be understood through a developmental perspective. Such a perspective would lead to appropriate programming during the evolution of the conflict. A key focus would be on teaching human rights as a way to educate for peace and thus restore peace and governance. They review some current practices in education in situations of violent conflict in order to illustrate how human rights education is an essential component of educating children and youth to resolve conflicts in non-violent ways and to accept a civil order ruled by law.
Article
Although student global competence has been recognized as an important learning outcome by more and more colleges and universities, campus internationalization efforts remain fragmented and largely ineffective. We proposed a pedagogical intervention that provided students from China and the U.S. with opportunities to establish virtual contact and to work collaboratively on international business related research papers. Then, we operationalized global competence as a three‐dimensional concept and designed an instrument to measure student global competence. The results provided some initial evidence on American students’ significantly lower performance in global knowledge and attitude, and confirmed the proposed pedagogical intervention as an easy‐to‐use and effective supplement to develop student global competence.
Article
The purpose of this research and report is to utilize a cosmopolitan pedagogical framework to qualitatively assess education for global competency in underserved communities. Using qualitative methods such as participant-observation and interviewing, a nine-month long participatory action research study is described that includes three educational programs facilitated through Hostelling International-Chicago and Chicago Public Schools. The results demonstrate that a cosmopolitanism pedagogical framework can teach global competencies that reflect hope, memory, and dialog as well as other cosmopolitan values to students who may not have the opportunity for more traditional international/intercultural education.