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VESA Display Stream Compression for Television and Cinema Applications

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Abstract

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) Display Stream Compression (DSC) standard is widely accepted as a low-cost, visually lossless codec for use in display links. However, as high dynamic range (HDR) and wide color gamut (WCG) technologies become more prevalent, several new features are needed to address television and cinema applications, including support for greater bit depths and 4:2:2/4:2:0 pixel formats. This paper overviews the DSC standard and outlines some new features that have been standardized in the recent VESA DSC 1.2 standard.

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... VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) is a lightweight video codec designed for low-impairment, low-latency compression and decompression over display links between computational devices and displays, or internal interfaces [1]. The codec is designed for a variety of display applications but in all cases the goal is to provide modest bandwidth reduction while maintaining sufficient fidelity so that a viewer cannot distinguish the compressed images or image sequences from the uncompressed source (visually lossless) [2]. ...
... In the DSC algorithm slices are independently decodable rectangular regions that can be processed independently. DSC 1.2 is reportedly less prone to horizontal slice boundary artifacts than previous versions of the codec, therefore, slice width in these trials was always at least 2 slices per line to make it more likely that horizontal slice boundaries would be visible [1]. The slice height varied by either 108 lines or 32 lines per slice to test coding quality with respect to slice height due to uneven bit budget allocation in the first line. ...
Conference Paper
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VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) is a light-weight codec designed for visually lossless compression over display links. Such high-performance algorithms must be evaluated subjectively to assess whether the codec meets visually lossless criteria. Here we present the first large-scale evaluation of DSC1.2 according to ISO/IEC 29170-2.
... VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) is a lightweight video codec designed for low-impairment, low-latency compression and decompression over display links between computational devices and displays, or internal interfaces [1]. The codec is designed for a variety of display applications but in all cases the goal is to provide modest bandwidth reduction while maintaining sufficient fidelity so that a viewer cannot distinguish the compressed images or image sequences from the uncompressed source (visually lossless) [2]. ...
... In the DSC algorithm slices are independently decodable rectangular regions that can be processed independently. DSC 1.2 is reportedly less prone to horizontal slice boundary artifacts than previous versions of the codec, therefore, slice width in these trials was always at least 2 slices per line to make it more likely that horizontal slice boundaries would be visible [1]. The slice height varied by either 108 lines or 32 lines per slice to test coding quality with respect to slice height due to uneven bit budget allocation in the first line. ...
Article
Full-text available
VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) is a light-weight codec designed for visually lossless compression over display links. Such high-performance algorithms must be evaluated subjectively to assess whether the codec meets visually lossless criteria. Here we present the first large-scale evaluation of DSC1.2 according to ISO/IEC 29170-2.
... VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) is a lightweight video codec designed for low-impairment, low-latency compression and decompression over display links between computational devices and displays, or internal interfaces [1]. The codec is designed for a variety of display applications but in all cases the goal is to provide modest bandwidth reduction while maintaining sufficient fidelity so that a viewer cannot distinguish the compressed images or image sequences from the uncompressed source (visually lossless) [2]. ...
... In the DSC algorithm slices are independently decodable rectangular regions that can be processed independently. DSC 1.2 is reportedly less prone to horizontal slice boundary artifacts than previous versions of the codec, therefore, slice width in these trials was always at least 2 slices per line to make it more likely that horizontal slice boundaries would be visible [1]. The slice height varied by either 108 lines or 32 lines per slice to test coding quality with respect to slice height due to uneven bit budget allocation in the first line. ...
... The Video Electronics Standard Association (VESA) has proposed a new standard of low-cost, visually lossless video codec for compressing video streams on the host sides and decompressing them on the display sides, thereby resolving the bandwidth limitation; namely, Display Stream Compression (DSC) [9]. The VESA DSC has focused on the environment that the host sides generally have abundant computing resources, such as powerful CPUs and GPUs with ample memory space and enough power resources. ...
... The DSC standard also applies MPP and BP as optional prediction schemes; pixel values are predicted using the neighboring pixels by the algorithms. More details of these prediction modes are explained by Walls and MacInnis [9]. ...
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... Therefore, many studies have been conducted to reduce power consumption by decreasing the size of image data with simple compression method before transmission to use computing processes and memory as small as possible [6][7][8]. Accordingly, low-memory compression methods have been adopted in mobile devices, especially in those that require high-power consumption and bandwidth for high-resolution display [9] and in vehicle safety systems that require very low delays for real-time image transmission [10]. ...
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... The complexity of SfM is high, because it requires a separate matrix for each camera view. This problem can be solved by applying a technique called redundant view mining 1 We consider 162°×135°fields of view (FoV), 60 pixels per degree, 96 bits per pixel, 1800 fps refresh rate, and display stream compression [39]. [42], which is able to reduce the processing time by about 36%. ...
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... Two lightweight algorithms have been developed recently to address this growing requirement. VESA Display Stream Compression standard (DSC) 1.2a is a released, lightweight video codec designed to provide low-impairment, low-latency compression for display applications with greater dynamic range [1]. The recently introduced VESA Display Compression-M Standard v1.0 (VDC-M) is a higher-complexity codec targeting higher rates of compression for use where higher pixel bandwidth is required (e.g. ...
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VC-2 Video Compression
  • Smpte St
VC-2 Video Compression, SMPTE ST.2042-1, 2012.