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Infographic. Physical activity for children and young people

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Abstract

Physical activity (PA) levels amongst children and young people in the UK fall short of the Chief Medical Officers' (CMOs) guidelines and continue to decline.1 ,2 This trend is exaggerated in specific groups such as those of low socio-economic status and teenage girls.2 Childhood inactivity has huge implications for physical and psychological development …

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  • Department of Health
World Health Organization. Prevalence of insufficient physical activity among adults Data by country
World Health Organization. Prevalence of insufficient physical activity among adults Data by country. Glob. Heal. Obs. data Repos. 2016. http://www.who.int/ gho/tobacco/en/index.html.