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THE GESNERIACEAE OF SULAWESI VI: THE SPECIES FROM MEKONGGA MTS. WITH A NEW SPECIES OF CYRTANDRA DESCRIBED

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Field exploration of the flora of the Mekongga Mountainous area of Southeast Sulawesi was conducted from 2009 to 2011. Herbarium specimens collected during this exploration and additional collections from Herbarium Bogoriense (BO) included 21 species in nine genera of the family Gesneriaceae. These comprise one species of Aeschynanthus, four species of Agalmyla, one species of Codonoboea, seven species of Cyrtandra, one species of Epithema, three species of Monophyllaea, two species of Rhynchoglossum, one species of Rhynchotechum and one species of Stauranthera. Twelve of these species are consider-ed endemic to Sulawesi while the rest are known to occur on neighbouring islands or are more widely distributed. Monophyllaea merrilliana, previously known only from the Philippine Islands and Borneo, is newly recorded for Sulawesi. A new species of Cyrtandra collected in the Mekongga area, C. widjajae, which resembles C. gorontaloensis from North Sulawesi but differs in having shorter pedicels and curved rather than straight fruits, is described.
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... Other than a recombination by Burtt (Burtt, 1990), no new names for Sulawesi Cyrtandra were then published for over 100 years (Mendum & Atkins, 2004). Fieldwork in North Sulawesi, Gorontalo, Central Sulawesi and Southeast Sulawesi in the early 2000s led to publication of a further 23 species (Atkins, 2004;Bone & Atkins, 2013;Kartonegoro & Potter, 2014;Kartonegoro et al., 2018). Four new species are described here, bringing the total for the island to 39. ...
... The others in the group are Cyrtandra balgooyi, C. gambutensis, C. gorontaloensis, C. parvicalyx and C. widjajae. Cyrtandra engleri is most similar to C. widjajae, a species originally described from Southeast Sulawesi (Kartonegoro & Potter, 2014) but that also extends into North Sulawesi. It can be distinguished from Cyrtandra widjajae most easily by the smaller number of lateral vein pairs (4 or 5 in C. engleri versus 8-10 in C. widjajae) and the short-acuminate leaf apices (2-5 mm long in C. engleri versus up to 20 mm long in C. widjajae). ...
... Etymology. This species is named after Elizabeth A. Widjaja (BO), bamboo taxonomist and one of the collectors of the type of this species (Kartonegoro & Potter, 2014). ...
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... Petiole 2-6 × ca. 1 mm, flattened, grooved above, laxly scaly. Flower buds Mekongga not include to conservation area like Nature conservation or National Park (Kartonegoro, 2014). The damage habitat is likely to be caused more by fire than from lightning. ...
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