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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish rethinking project management (RPM) initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the RPM research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire each other in research and practice. Design/methodology/approach This is an empirical paper based on collaborative research between industry and researchers. PHD has developed principles and practices driven by industry consisting of ten leading stars and the impact, leadership and flow (ILF) method. The ten leading stars and ILF method are compared to RPM research. The comparative analysis is then used in a broader discussion about how the research-driven RPM initiative can enrich the industry-driven PHD initiative and vice versa depicted in a theoretical understanding of translations between global ideas and local implementations. Findings RPM and PHD share a focus on value creation, social processes, learning and complexity while PHD also focusses on lean thinking, agile thinking, front-end loading and leadership, which are largely topics beyond the RPM research stream. Originality/value The paper presents how stakeholders from Danish industry interpret the actuality in projects and how they want to move forward with a radically different project paradigm. This is expressed in the ten leading stars and ILF method, which is compared and contrasted to the existing RPM literature providing a foundation for further development of both RPM and PHD.
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... Project Half Double (PHD) is a Danish project management initiative intended at enhancing performance in projects, experimenting with methods in real-world projects (Svejvig et al., 2016). PHD explicitly emphasizes the necessity of engaging the project owner as an active and committed participant. ...
... Half Double is a project management methodology intended to enhance performance in project organizations. It aspires to reform project leadership in ways of less bureaucracy, less formal steering committee meetings and less contractual focus (Svejvig, et al., 2016). A core element of this methodology is the emphasis on "an active ownership approach". ...
... The project owner should remove organizational obstacles and invest time with the project -three hours biweekly as a rule of thumb -to ask questions, challenge decisions and becomes an active and engaged partner in the project work all around. It is argued that taking part in meetings will ensure continuous focus on impact and guide the overall project to stakeholder satisfaction (Svejvig, et al., 2016). This means that the active project owner and the project manager complement each other and are supposed to work in close collaboration to develop an informal and trusting relationship (Svejvig & Grex, 2016). ...
Chapter
Top management support and the involvement of project owners in projects has been high on the agenda for a long time. Research suggests that this is more critical for project success than any other success factor. Studies show that the relationship between project owner and project manager is complex characterized by information asymmetry and potential mistrust. Studies also show that top managers may actually be reluctant to play an active role during the project life cycle. In this paper, we examine how the involvement of project owners unfolds in the project process, when given explicit attention in six projects in six different companies. We use data from Project Half Double, which is a Danish project management initiative intended at enhancing performance in projects. The paper shows that three of the organizations seem to develop efficient collaboration between project owner and project, while three other projects struggle to make this happen due to the project owners' lack of time and focus.
... Svejvig [20] The Danish agenda for rethinking project management 9 ...
... Lean construction is good for dealing with static or predictable environments [11]. Agile project management is more focused on managing dynamic and uncertain environments [20,21]. ...
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This research aims to contribute to the development of knowledge in project management, by searching for management approaches that can be useful in construction projects. A bibliometric approach based on quantitative analysis methods was applied to investigate the synergy between Traditional, Agile, and Lean management approaches. This study also evaluates the status of the three different approaches using a visualization analysis of journal articles. The bibliometric study was developed with a portfolio of 200 papers around "synergy between Traditional, Agile and Lean approaches" collected at the Web of Science database, covering the evolution of this topic over the last ten years (from 2011 to 2020). The retrieved records were analyzed in terms of year of publication, country, subject, and keywords. The analysis of the original articles revealed that the total number of publications has continuously increased over the last few years. The country producing more papers on this theme was the United States followed by England and Germany. Few studies in the literature have discussed this theme in the construction industry, which means that the concept of combining Traditional, Agile, and Lean approaches is a new concept in construction projects.
... First, moving from "being ontology" to "becoming ontology," and second, by moving from "external from cognition" to "fruit of cognition," and based on these two dimensions, they determined the position of four schools of thought in project management, including premodern, modern, postmodern, and hypermodern (Gauthier and Ika, 2012). Svejvig and Grex (2016) illustrated unique aspects of Danish Rethinking Project Management. This rethinking movement has some unique characteristics compared to well-known re-thinking project management. ...
... First, as the authors explained, this rethinking movement has emerged from industry; therefore, it reflects ontological and epistemological changes that occurred in project practice. Furthermore, there is more emphasize on lean thinking, agile thinking, and leadership (Svejvig and Grex, 2016), these are critical components in dealing with uncertainty and the complexity of projects in the new world Geraldi and Söderlund, 2016). Finally, it is important to refer to the Biedenbach and Müller (2011) study, as they examined research that was published by the IRNOP conferences, from a paradigmatic perspective. ...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the philosophical changes which underpin research and practices in project management. This study is an attempt to challenge previous studies that have tried to explain this change in order to provide a better explanation. Design/methodology/approach The authors adopt a critical review research method to challenge previous explanations of the paradigm change and definition of communication. For this purpose, philosophical and social theories and concepts have been used. Findings This paper proposed changing the paradigm from modernism to postmodernism and the paradigm shift, which happens from postmodernism to participation, as a better explanation for the paradigmatic change in project management. Furthermore, the important role of communication has been illustrated in the participation paradigm. Originality/value For the first time in project management, the authors attempt to clarify the role of power in this paradigmatic shift, especially because this concept is an axial concept in postmodern philosophy and a neglected concept in project management literature. In addition, communicative action theory has been used with the aim of pursuing the influence of informal power in the participation paradigm and paving the way for confronting its emerging challenges in future studies.
... There are around 50 articles published in IJMPB related to various aspects of project management. This is an important category of articles that discusses various topics such as project management standards (H€ allgren et al., 2012), project management contributions (Aubry et al., 2009), flexibility of project management (Jalali Sohi et al., 2019), ethics in project management (M€ uller and Bredillet, 2014), political and social dimensions of project management (Hodgson and Cicmil, 2008), changes in project management (Blomquist and Lundin, 2010), maturity in project management (Pasian et al., 2012), rethinking project management (Svejvig and Grex, 2016) and future of project management (Morris, 2010). ...
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This study examines scholarly communications in the International Journal of Managing Projects in Business (IJMPB) and identifies the journal’s leading trends from 2008 to 2019. This study analyzed a sample of 522 articles published in the IJMPB since its inception in 2008 until 2019. A set of bibliometric measures was used in the study to identify publication trends, citation structures, leading authors, institutions, and countries. Additionally, analysis of research methodologies, industrial sectors, and research themes of the articles was carried out through a rigorous content analysis. To examine the changes in journal expansion over time, the duration of publications (from 2008 to 2019) was divided into three sub-periods. The study findings show that 793 authors from 370 institutions and 58 countries contributed to the journal during this period. In terms of contributions, Australia and the Scandinavian countries are at the top, while Asian and African countries occupy a lower position. Moreover, among authors, Derek H.T. Walker was found to be the most prolific with the highest weighting score and number of articles. Similarly, RMIT University of Australia emerged as the most productive institution. The articles were predominantly case studies followed by mixed methods (i.e., both surveys and interviews are used for data collection). Most of the articles in the sample were related to project management in general. However, several articles reported on construction, information technology (IT), and manufacturing projects. This study is useful for the researcher community to understand the journal’s scientific productivity. Further, it will also help identify dominant topics in the field of project management. This is the first comprehensive review article presenting a general overview of the journal’s leading trends and researchers since its inception in 2008.
... The study is based on an initiative called Project Half Double, which has the purpose to build up a new and radical project paradigm to increase the competitiveness of the Danish industry. Project Half Double is a cooperation between Implement Consulting Group, manufacturing companies and universities Svejvig & Grex, 2016). Project Half Double has created the Half Double Methodology (HDM) (methodology artifact). ...
Conference Paper
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There are many theoretical and practical reasons for evaluating projects-including explorative arguments focusing on expanding descriptive knowledge on project work as well as normative arguments focusing on improving prescriptive models of project performance. Despite the need for project management methodologies that work and combat project failure, and research methods that can assess effective project management and methodologies, as well as empirical research on the actuality of projects as practice, evaluation research on projects including project management and methodologies is scarce. Each of the framework's four approaches provides a distinct evaluation that sheds light on some issues while leaving others unattended. Following these lines, the paper calls for more multi-faceted project evaluations. Introducing a framework that can help analyze existing evaluations and structure upcoming evaluations by highlighting beneficial aspects and/or revealing hidden issues, the aim of this paper is to contribute to the theoretical and practical field of project management. The paper contributes to project theory and practice by inspiring project researchers and aiding project workers in their efforts to open up the black box of projects and deliver relevant and valuable results. 2 NFF17 full paper 1.00.docx
... 3. After such motivational elements, assumed to be a concern on the research community towards the increase of value in governance roles, the same motivations are the drive to enlarge the search onto posterior works by research community with contribute proposal for the RPM direction's proposals [3,4,10,11], and accessing the scholar main finding in the last three years related with project, program and portfolio governance -Sect. 3.1. ...
Chapter
This work proposes a new motivation for a literature review on the concepts of roles in project, program and portfolio governance within organizational overall governance. Recent literature has been promoting a paradigm change in the way how the research and practitioner communities should approach project management. Under such change, it mattered to better understand in a first moment which drivers regarding project, program and portfolio governance roles motivated or, in part, enabled such change. In a second moment the focus was placed on the way how project, program and portfolio governance roles (whereas the concept of role demonstrates to need clarifications under the main standards and practitioners books) are addressed from that paradigm shift onwards. As a result, we concluded that current standards and practitioners books do not promote and effective integration with organizational governance, and although initiatives as Research Project Management promote a shift by addressing a required multidisciplinary approach on project management discipline, such governance alignment is yet to be achieved. The conclusion and final remarks on the future work, stresses onto the evidenced gaps in promoting a coherent set of theories, models and tools in project management discipline, and the apparent suitability of Enterprise Engineering discipline to address them.
... Työskentelyyn ja toimintaympäristöön liittyvä epävarmuus tunnustetaan, mutta hankesuunnitelmissa riskeihin valmistautuminen jätetään aiempaa väljemmäksi. (Lenfle & Loch 2010) Jotkut hankeosaajat ovat lähteneet toteuttamaan muun muassa lean-ajattelua (Svejvig 2012; Svejvig & Grex 2016). Silti tehtäväorientoitunut perinteinen hanketyöskentely on pitänyt pintansa ja yleensä hankkeille asetetaan yksiselitteinen päämäärä ja ajallinen rajaus sekä tietyt taloudelliset ja organisatoriset resurssit, joiden puitteissa sovitut, toisiinsa sidotut tehtävät suoritetaan (Wysocki 2014, 4-6). ...
... The field of project management/project organising (PM) has for decades been expanding rapidly in recognition of the scope and its range of perspectives (Dalcher, 2016;Hodgson and Cicmil, 2016;Svejvig and Grex, 2016;van der Hoorn, 2016;Walker and Lloyd-Walker, 2016). Projectification of work continues to proliferate. ...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore recent literature on the impact of changes in the workplace environment and projected trends through to the year 2030. This allows the authors to identify and discuss what key trends are changing the nature of project organising work. The authors aim to identify what knowledge and which skills, attributes and experiences will be most likely valued and needed in 2030. Design/methodology/approach This paper is essentially a reflective review and is explorative in nature. The authors focus on several recent reports published in the UK and Australia that discuss the way that the future workforce will adapt and prepare for radical changes in the workplace environment. The authors focus on project organising work and the changing workplace knowledge, skills, attributes and experience (KSAE) needs of those working in project teams in 2030 and beyond. The authors draw upon existing KSAE literature including findings from a study undertaken into the KSAEs of project alliance managers working in a highly collaborative form of project delivery. Findings The analysis suggests that there is good and bad news about project workers prospects in 2030. The good news is that for those working in non-routine roles their work will be more interesting and rewarding than is the case for today. The bad news is that for workers in routine work roles, they will be replaced by advanced digital technology. Research limitations/implications Few, if any, papers published in the project organising literature speculate about what this discipline may look like or what KSAEs will be valued and needed. Practical implications This paper opens up a debate about how project management/project organising work will be undertaken in future and what skills and expertise will be required. It also prompts project managers to think about how they will craft their careers in 2030 in response to expected work environment demands. This will have professional and learning implications. Social implications The issue of the future workplace environment is highly relevant to the social context. Originality/value This paper is about a projected future some 12 years onward from today. It bridges a gap in any future debate about how project organising jobs may change and how they will be delivered in the 2030s.
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Increased complexity in projects has forced new project management initiatives. In software development several agile methods have emerged and are today highly implemented in practice. Observations of general project management practice show how it has been inspired by agile software development, but very little research addresses the issue of agile project management. In order to understand and to provide suggestions for future practice on how agility can be incorporated in general project management, this paper provides an analysis which compares ten characteristics of agile software development (identified in theory) and the Half Double Methodology developed by the Danish Project Half Double initiative; a Methodology developed with practitioners and tested in seven Danish case companies. The analysis shows how the general project management to a great extent has been inspired by agile methods, but also that general project management may be able to find more inspiration from agile methods.
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Accelerating time to impact is a serious and important challenge for today's organizations. This paper combines the literatures of project acceleration and benefit management to inquire into the possibilities of accelerating time to impact. Specifically, it explores a practitioner-driven Danish initiative targeted at increasing the speed at which project benefits are attained, and it analyzes why some projects were able to achieve benefits faster than others. The initiative functions as a major social experiment, where the same project methodology was implemented in several Danish project-based organizations. We analyze five of these organizations. We identified reasons for the differences and grouped them in a conceptual model: the ‘house of time to impact’ with three areas: valuing speed, owning speed and entraining speed in the organization. The paper's contribution is the bridge between the literatures on benefit and time management, bringing two pressing issues together. The contribution to practice lies in the considerations and stories of other organizations attempting to reconcile the increasing need for effectiveness
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Through an empirical study of two inter-organizational project networks in a cultural setting, this article explores how value is created in project networks. The article discusses recent theoretical developments that suggest linking value constellations and project networks. The findings focus on how value is created; this is done through identifying four key value creation activities: developing infrastructure, creating knowledge, changing minds, and managing for value capture. In light of this, two value constellations are suggested, and the service-dominant logic is applied for developing a conceptual model of value creation in project networks, including theoretical and practical implications.
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This article mainly focuses on projects-as-practice based in the social sciences, and it suggests that the situated practice side of a social phenomenon is also important as a basis of study for understanding what is done. While the study is empirical, it focuses on the actions and actors involved in building or organizing environments, rather than simply looking at aggregated social processes or structures. With this approach, projects are seen as the sum of the actions of the people involved, which emphasizes both how people involved in projects act and how their typical workdays are structured. This may shed light on areas such as the importance of project management practice for strategic organizational change or the improvisation that is necessary for project execution.
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Strategic Project Leadership® (SPL) is a new approach to project management that is focusing projects on creating competitive advantage and winning in the marketplace. This approach is particularly relevant to strategic projects that are initiated to create the company's future, including almost all R&D projects. In the traditional approach, project managers and teams were typically focused on getting the job done, and meeting time and budget goals. SPL, provides a modern view. It suggests that projects are initiated for business reasons, and that just 'getting the job done' is not enough. This paper presents a mindset, a framework, and a practical, step-by-step approach on how to connect project management to business results and how to turn projects into powerful competitive weapons. The paper is based on extensive case research, of which we present six cases - three successes and three disappointments - to demonstrate the value of the SPL approach to project management.
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The Agile project management methodology has been widely used in recent years as a means to counter the dangers of traditional, front-end planning methods that often lead to downstream development pathologies. Although numerous authors have pointed to the advantages of Agile, with its emphasis on individuals and interactions over processes, customer collaboration over contracts and formal negotiations, and responsiveness over rigid planning, there are, to date, very few large-scale, empirical studies to support the contention that Agile methods can improve the likelihood of project success. Developed originally for software development, it is still predominantly an IT phenomenon. But due to its success it has now spread to non-IT projects. Using a data sample of 1002 projects across multiple industries and countries, we tested the effect of Agile use in organizations on two dimensions of project success: efficiency and overall stakeholder satisfaction against organizational goals. We further examined the moderating effects of variables such as perceived quality of the vision/goals of the project, project complexity, and project team experience. Our findings suggest that Agile methods do have a positive impact on both dimensions of project success. Further, the quality of the vision/goals is a marginally significant moderator of this effect. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.
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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to summarize a successfully defended doctoral dissertation and to place this research in context to emerging areas of international project management (PM), leadership, and cultural intelligence, and to encourage others to embark on further research related to this important topic. Design/methodology/approach – Results reported in this paper were based upon action learning, and were subsequently tested by utilizing a Delphi panel of international subject matter experts. Findings – The primary finding was that there are five dimensions of cross-cultural leadership intelligence (XLQ) that enable leaders to function effectively in any culture: societal, business, or group. Research limitations/implications – Research efforts point to the skills that project and business leaders must have to effectively lead cross-cultural teams, virtual or co-located. It suggests the areas of research that need to be undertaken to put metrics on each dimension, and so to provide a means of training and testing potential leaders. Originality/value – From academic perspective, the synthesis of anthropology, sociology, psychology, business, management, and leadership enhances the body of knowledge of PM. For practical applications, the dimensions identified can be employed and utilized to begin training of international leaders. The thesis may be downloaded from URL http://adt.lib.rmit.edu.au/adt/public/adt-VIT20061116.125205/
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This hugely informative and wide-ranging analysis on the management of projects, past, present and future, is written both for practitioners and scholars. Beginning with a history of the discipline's development, Reconstructing Project Management provides an extensive commentary on its practices and theoretical underpinnings, and concludes with proposals to improve its relevancy and value. Written not without a hint of attitude, this is by no means simply another project management textbook. The thesis of the book is that 'it all depends on how you define the subject'; that much of our present thinking about project management as traditionally defined is sometimes boring, conceptually weak, and of limited application, whereas in reality it can be exciting, challenging and enormously important. The book draws on leading scholarship and case studies to explore this thesis. The book is divided into three major parts. Following an Introduction setting the scene, Part 1 covers the origins of modern project management - how the discipline has come to be what it is typically said to be; how it has been constructed - and the limitations of this traditional model. Part 2 presents an enlarged view of the discipline and then deconstructs this into its principal elements. Part 3 then reconstructs these elements to address the challenges facing society, and the implications for the discipline, in the years ahead. A final section reprises the sweep of the discipline's development and summarises the principal insights from the book. This thoughtful commentary on project (and program, and portfolio) management as it has developed and has been practiced over the last 60-plus years, and as it may be over the next 20 to 40, draws on examples from many industry sectors around the world. It is a seminal work, required reading for everyone interested in projects and their management..
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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a leagile transformation model for product development that guides manufacturers in the construction of a road map and the management of its deployment in line with both lean and agile improvement objectives. Design/methodology/approach – An intervention qualitative and transformative research approach was adopted in order to develop required knowledge to theorise professional practice made from rigorous observations of facts. The research project took place over a period of two and a half years, in partnership with an international firm that develops and produces a wide range of luxury products. Findings – The application of the methodology proved that a lean transformation does not have to be generated only by the field needs but it can follow a mixed approach where a top-down transformation management linked with strategic objectives is deployed without compromising implication and needs from people on the field. The right balance can be found between the strategic aspect of transformation and the incremental aspect on the field of lean paradigms. Research limitations/implications – For complete validation and widespread scientific application, the model should be tested in other sectors and industries. Practical implications – The application case of the leagile model in several divisions of a luxury organisation proved that the proposed approach can be used as a guide for manufacturer in the construction of an improvement road map and in the management of its deployment. The application cases enabled a number of positive results to be generated and measured on quantitative indicators such as service ratio for new products for which, one of the divisions saw an increase of 30 per cent. The approach created a positive revolution among development team members by its potential in terms of communication, steering, benchmarking and knowledge system. Originality/value – The model supports the identification and prioritisation of improvement initiatives by focusing on the levers for improvement that meet the needs and objectives of transformation, as well as the organisation’s maturity level.
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This paper aims to take stock of what we know about project value creation and to present future directions for research and practice. We performed an explorative and unstructured literature review, which was subsequently paired with a structured literature review. We join several research areas by adopting the project value creation perspective on literature relating to benefits, value, performance, and success in projects. Our review includes 111 contributions analyzed through both an inductive and deductive approach. We find that relevant literature dates back to the early 1980s, and the still developing value-centric view has been the subject of many publications in recent years. We contribute to research on project value creation through four directions for future research: rejuvenating value management through combining value, benefits, and costs; supplementing value creation with value capture; applying a holistic approach to project, portfolio, and strategic management; and theorizing by applying independent models and frameworks.
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Facilitating change is more effective than attempting to prevent it. Learn to trust in your ability to respond to unpredictable events; it's more important than trusting in your ability to plan for disaster. In the past 12–18 months, a wide range of publications—Software Development, IEEE Software, Cutter IT Journal, Software Testing and Quality Engineering, and even The Economist—has published articles on what Martin Fowler calls the New Methodology (see www.martinfowler.com/articles/newMethodology.html), reflecting a growing interest in these new approaches to software development (Extreme Programming, Crystal Methodologies, SCRUM, Adaptive Software Development, Feature-Driven Development and Dynamic Systems Development Methodology among them). In addition to these "named" methodologies, scores of organizations have developed their own "lighter" approach to building software. Formation of the Agile Alliance On February 11–13, 2001, at The Lodge at Snowbird ski resort in the Wasatch mountains of Utah, 17 people met to talk, ski, relax and try to find common ground. What emerged was the Agile Software Development Alliance. A bigger gathering of organizational anarchists would be hard to find, so what emerged from this meeting was symbolic—a Manifesto for Agile Software Development—signed by all participants. Although the Manifesto provides some specifics, a deeper theme drives many Alliance members. At the close of the two-day meeting, Extreme Programming mentor Bob Martin joked that he was about to make a "mushy" statement. Though tinged with humor, Bob's sentiments were shared by the group—we all enjoyed working with people who shared compatible goals and values based on mutual trust and respect, promoting collaborative, people-focused organizational models, and building the types of professional communities in which we would want to work. The agile methodology movement is not anti-methodology; in fact, many of us want to restore credibility to the word. We also want to restore a balance: We embrace modeling, but not merely to file some diagram in a dusty corporate repository. We embrace documentation, but not to waste reams of paper in never-maintained and rarely-used tomes. We plan, but recognize the limits of planning in a turbulent environment. Those who brand proponents of XP, SCRUM or any of the other agile methodologies as "hackers" are ignorant of both the methodologies and the original definition of the term (a "hacker" was first defined as a programmer who enjoys solving complex programming problems, rather than someone who practices ad hoc development or destruction).
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This paper presents the results of a structured review of the rethinking project management (RPM) literature based on the classification and analysis of 74 contributions and in addition takes a critical look at this brave new world. Through the analysis, a total of 6 overarching categories emerged: contextualization, social and political aspects, rethinking practice, complexity and uncertainty, actuality of projects and broader conceptualization. These categories cover a broad range of different contributions with diverse and alternative perspectives on project management. The early RPM literature dates back to the 1980s, while the majority was published in 2006 onwards, and the research stream appears to be still active. A critical look at this brave new world exhibits the overall challenge for RPM to become much more diffused and accepted.
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The view is expressed that alternative concepts of good project management should be sought that are not necessarily based on traditional Western ideas. Although Western thinking has had a strong influence in the past, it has been shown to be fallible, and the experiences of other countries should be considered. One alternative, formulated in Scandinavia, is described.
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This theory-development case study of the quality circle management fashion focuses on three features of management-knowledge entrepreneurs' discourse promoting or discrediting such fashions: its lifecycle, forces triggering stages in its lifecycle, and the type of collective learning it fostered. Results suggest, first, that variability in when different types of knowledge entrepreneurs begin, continue, and stop promoting fashions explains variability in their lifecycles; second, that historically unique conjunctions of forces, endogenous and exogenous to the management-fashion market, trigger and shape management fashions; and third, that emotionally charged, enthusiastic, and unreasoned discourse characterizes the upswings of management fashion waves, whereas more reasoned, unemotional, and qualified discourse characterizes their downswings, evidencing a pattern of superstitious collective learning.
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As an introduction to the special issue topic of value creation, we define value creation in terms of use value and exchange value and discuss some of the key issues related to its study, including the topic of value capture. Although the definition of value creation is common across levels of analysis, the process of value creation will differ based on whether value is created by an individual, an organization, or society. We use the concepts of competition and isolating mechanisms to explain how value can be captured at different levels of analysis.
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A bestseller since its First Edition, Institutions and Organizations remains the key source for a comprehensive overview of the institutionalist approach to organization theory. W. Richard Scott presents a historical overview of the theoretical literature, an integrative analysis of current institutional approaches, and a review of empirical research related to institutions and organizations. He offers an extensive review and critique of institutional analysis in sociology, political science, and economics as it relates to recent theory and research on organizations.
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Recent large capital oil sands construction projects have all experienced significant cost overruns. There are a number of reasons for these overruns, some of which are listed in this article. This article provides a review of recent experiences and challenges in delivering mega oil sands projects in Alberta. In addition, this article focuses on the front-end loading (planning) phases 1, 2, and 3 and describes the effort needed to deliver mega projects, provides schedule comparisons of key engineering milestones, and analyzes scope changes and contingencies.
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Benefits Realisation Management (BRM) is becoming an increasingly important aspect of project and programme management. However, commentators have observed that the practice of BRM is often flawed, and have made suggestions as to how practice might be improved. This paper is concerned with the reasons why the implementation of BRM might not be straightforward, by focusing on the underlying assumptions. It will approach the issue by drawing on the author's experience from the 1990s and 2000s in working in the management of government-funded regeneration programmes in the UK. In this field there was a rigid benefits management framework, although it precedes the development of BRM. The paper will argue that there are important underlying conceptual issues in benefits management which have practical implications and need to be recognised in the development of theory for BRM.Highlights► Benefits Realisation Management (BRM) is a developing part of project management. ► Existing theory is largely based on the ‘modern paradigm’ of management science. ► Benefits management practice does not always accord with these theories. ► Alternatives to the ‘modern paradigm’ are needed for theory building. ► BRM is neither a panacea, nor a false dawn, but lies somewhere in between.
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We explore whether structural factors of NPD (new product development) team such as its physical co-location and team composition are still relevant and important in enhancing manufacturability as part of NPD performance in this highly virtualized coordination era as much as in the past before the Internet. We also examine how the analysis result is affected by the product's innovativeness as well as other control variables like project duration and product type. In order to answer the research questions, we collected data on 127 pro-jects of new product development at a global consumer electronics company. Based on our analysis, we conclude that whether the NPD members are physically co-located throughout the product development process and whether the team membership is balanced have pro-found implications for enhancing manufacturability.
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To escape the intense competition of today's global economy, large established organizations seek growth options beyond conventional new product development that leads to incremental changes in current product lines. Radical innovation (RI) is one such pathway, which results in organically driven growth through the creation of whole new lines of business that bring new to the world performance features to the market and may result in the creation of entirely new markets. Yet success is elusive, as many have experienced and scholars have documented. This article reports results of a three-year, longitudinal study of 12 large established firms that have declared a strategic intent to evolve their RI capabilities. In contrast to other academic research that has analyzed specific projects to understand management practices appropriate for RI, the present research reported explores the evolution of management systems for enabling radical innovation to occur repeatedly in large firms and reports on one aspect of this management system: organizational structures for enabling and nurturing RI. To consider organizational structure as a venue for capability development is new in the management of innovation and dynamic capabilities literatures. Conventional wisdom holds that RIs should be incubated outside the company and assimilated once they have gained traction in the marketplace. Numerous experiments with organizational structures were observed that instead work to manage the interfaces between the RI management system and the mother organization. These structures are described here, and insights are drawn out regarding radical innovation competency requirements, transition challenges, senior leadership mandates, and business-unit ambidexterity. The centerpiece of this research is the explication of the Discovery–Incubation–Acceleration framework, which details three sets of necessary, though not sufficient competencies, for building an RI capability.
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Strategic Project Leadership®(SPL) is a new approach to project management that is focusing projects on creating competitive advantage and winning in the marketplace. This approach is particularly relevant to strategic projects that are initiated to create the company's future, including almost all R&D projects. In the traditional approach, project managers and teams were typically focused on getting the job done, and meeting time and budget goals. SPL, provides a modern view. It suggests that projects are initiated for business reasons, and that just ‘getting the job done’ is not enough. This paper presents a mindset, a framework, and a practical, step-by-step approach on how to connect project management to business results and how to turn projects into powerful competitive weapons. The paper is based on extensive case research, of which we present six cases – three successes and three disappointments – to demonstrate the value of the SPL approach to project management.1
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The article introduces a project management approach, which focuses on adopting a strategic view in the project implementation process. Such strategic view means that a consideration on the purpose of the project as a whole must be maintained in the course of project implementation. This includes adopting and maintaining the focus on the functionality and operability features of the project product. The functionality simulation approach itself is well known, e.g. in system engineering design. This article puts discrete event simulation in place in the project implementation process by suggesting that it can help to introduce new insights to conventional project scope management practices. Four simulation cases are presented to illustrate empirically how the management focus is casted in a strategic way to the functionality and operability of the project product. The cases provide understanding of the use of such simulation approach in the course of the project implementation process. The suggested simulation of the functionality of the project product introduces a directing view to project scope management, and this way it provides directions for operative tools that are designed for putting the component parts of the project together.