Article

Aircraft Antiskid Braking Control Method Based on Tire–Runway Friction Model

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Abstract

An aircraft antiskid braking system control method based on tire-runway friction model is proposed in this paper. The purpose is to keep tire-runway friction around its maximum value and prevent wheels from working in low-braking-efficiency regions. This paper defines a slip-factor parameter to distinguish between the adhesion region and the slip region, so that we can accurately obtain the location of the tire-runway friction peak. The slip factor needs signals, including wheel angular velocity and braking torque, and needs no aircraft longitudinal velocity value, which is difficult to detect. The proposed control method can automatically identify current runway conditions and yields robust performance with respect to unknown or changing runway conditions. Computer software simulations are conducted to verify the feasibility of the control method, and experiments are conducted on a ground-inertia braking test bench to validate the control method. The results show that the controller can detect the actual maximum tire-runway friction peak and also provide high adaptability in different tire-runway conditions.

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... In recent years, research on aircraft modeling has been roughly divided the problem into two categories. One is simplified, and the system contains only mass and a single wheel; meantime, some minor factors, such as the remaining thrust of the engine and the rolling resistance of the wheels, were left out of consideration [62]- [64], [68], [69]. Although the equations are simple, they retain the essential characteristics of the existing system. ...
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... In the previous studies, the traditional time-domain simulation method and the perturbation method are usually used to develop aircraft ground nonlinear dynamic models and to investigate the parameter influences on the system dynamic performance and stability. Jiao et al. 9, 10 established an aircraft ground taxiing model considering the tire-runway friction force to study the aircraft dynamic response during the braking process. Abzug 11 built an aircraft rollout perturbation analysis model based on the stability derivatives of tires, and the lateral stability was studied through transient analysis. ...
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... In 2017, Jiao et al. proposed a method to detect the runway friction coefficient by the slip factor, in which the calculation of the slip factor requires the installation of a brake torque sensor to obtain a brake torque signal. 9 In 2017, D'Avico et al. presented a method based on mixedslip-deceleration control, and they calculated ground friction with a detailed model of landing gear for antiskid braking control. 10 In 2018, Jia et al. proposed an active interference suppression control based on the optimal slip ratio, which controlled the working point of the system near the optimal slip ratio and restrained the interference in the braking process to ensure the high efficiency and stability of the brake. ...
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