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Music and Language Learning

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... Verrusio, Moscucci, Cacciafesta and Gueli (2015) stated that the effectiveness of the Mozart Effect is still undetermined to this day, where there are differing opinions among the studies that had been done. After Rauscher's first report of Mozart effect was released, her studies were supported by other findings (Rauscher et al., 1993(Rauscher et al., , 1995Rausher & Shaw, 1998;Hallam & Price, 1998;Nantais & Schellenberg, 1999;Jenkins, 2001;Kang & Williamson, 2004;Rauscher & Hinton, 2006;Taylor & Rowe, 2012;Khaghaninejad & Fahandejsaadi, 2016). ...
... The result of the experiment showed that the Mozart effect increased the scores of Origami task performance among pre-school children when the Mozart's music is played in the background. This study is based on the theory of Mozart effect which supports Rauscher's study and other researchers (Rauscher et al., 1993(Rauscher et al., , 1995Rauscher & Shaw, 1998;Hallam & Price, 1998;Nantais & Schellenberg, 1999;Jenkins, 2001;Kang & Williamson, 2004;Rauscher & Hinton, 2006;Taylor & Rowe, 2012;Khaghaninejad & Fahandejsaadi, 2016) who agreed that music could enhance spatial intelligence. This tests can be expanded to other types of intelligence test and different types of music can be used such as music from other genres or different composers. ...
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New approaches have always been explored by music education researchers in helping students to perform at their optimum level in their learning processes. The main purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of background music on Origami task performance among pre-school children aged five and six years old. Many types of research were done on the topic of background music on spatial task performance, however, little research was done among the group of pre-school children and using Origami as a measurement tool on spatial task performance. Ninety-one participants from two kindergartens in the Klang Valley, Malaysia were selected for the study. The Origami task chosen in this study is sampan (little boat). The selected background music in this study is Mozart’s Sonata, K.448 with the intention of replicating Rauscher and colleagues’ research in Mozart effect. In the experiment, the participants completed the folding of Origami sampan under two environments: (1) with music and (2) without music. The participants of Kindergarten A had undergone the environment with background music first, followed by the environment with background music while participants from Kindergarten B had undergone the environment with background music first, followed by the environment without background music. The purpose of switching the environments in the experiment for both kindergartens is to optimize the result of the data collected through the experiment. The Dependent T-tests were used to generate data and results had shown that the participants achieved higher scores in the Origami task in the environment with background music.
... Kuzman suggests using "the Mimic Method" and names three important components of language learning through music: "rhythm, repetition, rhymes". He believes that meaningful listening to a song with the text is a good way to learn to speak fluently: "singing well -speaking well" [7]. ...
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This paper examines the main approaches to mastering the skills of oral speech as presented in the talks of the Polyglot Gathering 2018 in Bratislava. The purpose of the study was to analyze polyglots’ practical observations on the subject available in the video recordings of their presentations at the Gathering. It is demonstrated that many polyglots emphasize the importance of spoken skills and suggest the principles of natural acquisition, positive emotions and consistency as study guidelines.
... To many people across the globe, music is an important part of everyday life. (Khaghaninejad & Fahandejsaadi, 2016). It conveys different levels of emotions, and it brings people closer. ...
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The aim of this study is to improve and regain the interest of Grade 8 students of Alexis G. Santos National High School in studying literature especially in dealing with poetry and narratives. This research utilized the descriptive type of design, particularly, the quasi-experimental. 108 students in the Grade 8 level participated in the study, serving as the control and experimental group with equal number and characteristics. After a seven-week exposure to songs as springboard to literature lessons of the experimental group, the difference between the means of the pre-test and post-test was measured to determine significance of the study. The researcher computed for the F-Test Two-Sample for Variance of Post Test for Control and Experimental Group, and t-Test of Paired Two-Sample for Mean of Post Test. There is a significant difference between the mean scores of the two groups, and the finding implied that the intervention material is effective for improving learner performance in English 8, specifically, in their understanding of basic figurative language and literature. The researcher recommended that teachers, curriculum planners and school heads consider motivation as an important aspect in the teaching and learning process.
... Research has revealed that music stimulates the brain and it is a creative and engaging way of advancing listening skills. Learning song lyrics also helps students to advance their vocabulary and singing phrases can lead to better vocabulary recall (Khaghaninejad & Fahandejsaadi, 2016). The findings of this study are in line with another study by Mohamadkhani et al. (2013), who investigated the effect of using audio sources on improving listening comprehension of secondary school students. ...
Article
The presented study aimed to investigate students’ competence in English listening skills and vocabulary proficiency at elementary school level focusing on the correlation between students’ listening skills, vocabulary proficiency and out-of-school exposure. A total of 123 students of the 9th grade participated in the study. Standardized listening and vocabulary tests were used to assess the students’ listening and vocabulary skills followed by a questionnaire to find out the correlation between the students’ listening skills, vocabulary proficiency and out-of-school exposure. Results show that out-of-classroom exposure to English in audio and audio-visual forms is positively related with levels of English listening skills and vocabulary proficiency whereas there is no indication that playing video-games in any form in English may be related to levels of English listening skills and vocabulary proficiency.
... The present research study takes place at a public secondary school located in the Valencian Community in Spain, which offers CLIL programs to students who receive instruction through English in subjects such as history and geography, technology and economics. Two main reasons have triggered the current study: on the one hand, and according to previous research (Khaghaninejad & Fahandejsaadi, 2016;García, García, & Yuste, 2012), it seems that learners can benefit from non-linguistic subjects like music due to the use of nonverbal communication; on the other hand, the potential incorporation of a CLIL program in the music classroom as part of the multilingual curriculum of the Spanish educational center has played a decisive role. As a result, a CLIL initiative in music is applied in the English lessons of 1 st year secondary education students. ...
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Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the teaching and learning of several languages in an attempt to generate multilingual education opportunities, particularly in Europe. In response to the demands of our globalized society, Content-Based Instruction (CBI), which has also been referred to as “immersion and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) programs,” emerged as a teaching approach that combines the learning of curricular contents and the communicative competence in the target language. This study was carried out at a public high school set in a Spanish bilingual community, where music is taught through a CLIL approach in English class. The purpose of this paper is to examine how students value their music lessons in English and to check the adequacy of teaching music as a subject in English. To achieve this goal, materials adapted to their level of proficiency and a final questionnaire were designed. Results indicate that students are satisfied with this proposal, since they consider these music lessons to be easier than the regular ones. Not only did they enjoy being exposed to English in these music lessons, but a considerable number of students would also like to take a CLIL program in the near future. Pedagogical implications to this CBI model account for the development of learners’ autonomy, the use of audio-visual aids and further research in bilingual and multilingual regions overseas.
Chapter
Which are the new directions in learning and teaching Modern Languages and English through literature? How can we use songs to talk about poetry in the language classroom, and how can creative writing workshops help with language teaching beyond the classroom? These are just a few questions addressed in this volume. Researchers and practitioners in Modern Languages and English as a Foreign Language share theory and their best practice on this pedagogical approach.
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Abstract Numerous articles have been written on the role of music in language learning. The contribution of various scholars of different backgrounds in acknowledging the significance of music in promoting language learning is indeed astounding and encouraging. One would then wonder what new contribution in this already swelling body of information that this article seeks to provide. First of all, this study seeks to discuss practical or rather pedagogical strategies by which music can be utilised to promote foreign language learning. The approach employed in this study is quite unique in the sense that translation is taken as the gateway through which music can be harnessed to improve foreign language learning. The view that is central in this discussion is that, since music is understood as a universal language that cuts across different age groups, social and cultural structures, channelling translation based activities towards music can be a powerful method of foreign language learning. Rather than simply singing and rehearsing target language songs, learners can be given tasks and projects of translating target language songs into their L1/L2 and performing their work in classroom activities. In such activities, learners are given an opportunity of not only enjoying the process of foreign language learning but most importantly of localising the language experience into their lifestyle, thus domesticating the foreign. For instance, giving them an opportunity to use the target language learning material to compile songs which they can translate and perform (both the original and the translated version) in front of other learners and the teacher, may give them the satisfaction of being the producers of their projects. Their chances of having an intimate relationship with their lyrics may be the much needed bond between the learner and the target language. In the context of this study, such projects are referred to as foreign language learning music/song projects. This discussion also encourages the utilisation of digitization in the performance of music/song projects. Hence, utilizing various applications that can be used to edit music (mini studios), music/song projects can be transformed into enjoyable activities, where learners may even forget that they are learning a foreign language and thus paving a way to a process of acquiring the target language rather than merely learning it
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The pedagogical activities that are generally proposed for exploiting songs in the language classroom rarely take into account the rich phonetic possibilities of chanted or sung language. Songs can magnify phonetic production; in this article, we will analyse why and how sung language can facilitate the acquisition of articulatory awareness (notions of good diction, standard language, various phonemic distinctions, etc.). Pedagogical criteria for selecting and exploiting songs that correspond to this phonetic objective will be outlined, based on several years' experience with graduate students in a language-teaching program at the Université de Lyon 2.
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The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of classical music (Mozart Sonata) on the reading comprehension performance of Iranian English students of different genders. To this end, the study put the reading comprehension of Iranian English students under focus for an academic semester (i.e. four months). The study's participants belonged to English institutes of private sector (i.e. Dialog Language Institute) and were selected through convenient sample selection. The participants were required to learn reading passages and accordingly take two tests of reading comprehension in different conditions, namely, no music (quiet situation) and Mozart music (music situation). A set of comparisons were made between teaching reading comprehension passages with background music and without background music through a set of t-tests. The results of the study showed a significant difference between the performance of the group exposed to music and the performance of those who had not. The participants who were taught reading passages with background music outperformed their peers who had experienced learning passages without background music. Nonetheless, this research implied that the participants' gender was not a determining factor at reading comprehension performance in music and non-music conditions of learning.
Article
The idea that extensive musical training can influence processing in cognitive domains other than music has received considerable attention from the educational system and the media. Here we analyzed behavioral data and recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) from 8-year-old children to test the hypothesis that musical training facilitates pitch processing not only in music but also in language. We used a parametric manipulation of pitch so that the final notes or words of musical phrases or sentences were congruous, weakly incongruous, or strongly incongruous. Musician children outperformed nonmusician children in the detection of the weak incongruity in both music and language. Moreover, the greatest differences in the ERPs of musician and nonmusician children were also found for the weak incongruity: whereas for musician children, early negative components developed in music and late positive components in language, no such components were found for nonmusician children. Finally, comparison of these results with previous ones from adults suggests that some aspects of pitch processing are in effect earlier in music than in language. Thus, the present results reveal positive transfer effects between cognitive domains and shed light on the time course and neural basis of the development of prosodic and melodic processing.
Book
Like the first edition, the second volume of Methods That Work is still a book of success stories for language teachers. However, it's not just for language teachers, but for all the teachers in the schools. The reason for the increased scope is that all teachers are bound to find communication a richer challenge in years to come because of the rapid growth of minority language populations around the world (see Scarcella, 1990). Of course, as teachers know, teaching means communicating effectively---that is, caring for students (Moskowitz, 1978) and sharing a community of knowledge and experience with them (Little & Sanders, 1989). The focus here is often on the teaching of foreign languages, English as a second language, and curricula for students from minority language backgrounds, but because of the changing demographics in today's world-with minority language students rapidly becoming the majority in many urban settings around the world and especially here in the U.S. (Ortiz & Yates, 1983; Cummins, 1986; Hamayan & Damico, 1991; Kagan, 1992)---all content-area teachers will find useful material in this book. Reading teachers as well as speech-language pathologists are addressed specifically and will find much that is applicable to their work.